Lightly Child, Lightly.

In silence which is active, the Inner Light begins to glow – a tiny spark. For the flame to be kindled and to grow, subtle argument and the clamour of our emotions must be stilled

The word born of silence must be received in silence.

~ Pierre Lacout, Quaker Faith & Practise (2.12) in Twelve Quakers and Worship


Notes:

  • Photo: Patty Maher. Quote: Thank you Beth @ Alive on All Channels
  • Prior “Lightly child, lightly” Posts? Connect here.
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

 

Sunday Morning: Perhaps, that is enough.

While not a believer himself, Mr. Ruse harbors a great deal of sympathy for those who find ultimate meaning in the universe and their lives through worship. Taking his cue from his own Quaker upbringing, he argues that three things remain deeply satisfying in life, even if philosophically one ends up on the side of Epicurus and his denial of design: family; a life of service to others; and, not surprisingly for a philosopher, the life of the mind. For many people, there is indeed purpose in each of these, and perhaps, Mr. Ruse suggests, that is enough.

~ John Farrell, from his “Review: To What End is All This?” where Farrell reviews ‘On Purpose’ by Michael Ruse


 

Photo of Dr. Michael Ruse via Strange Notions

4:09 am and Inspired: Pandas + Puppies + More…

We’re opening Hump Day with a short one minute clip about Pandas.  (Now who doesn’t just love Panda cubs.)  And then on to my inspiring posts of the week…



From Baltimore, MD, George Amoss Jr. @ The Post Modern Quaker with his post:  The Zen of Quakerism. “If, when I’m feeling a little playful, someone were to ask me to summarize Quakerism in a sentence or two, I might say this: You have a heart. Use it.”

From Blacksburg, VA, Erica Ann Sipes @ Beyond the Notes is a pianist and cellist, who is asked by a graduate trumpet student (a Marine) to serve as his pianist for his recital.  In From Battlefield to Stage:  “The recital began and I was literally bursting with pride by the end.  Was it perfect?  No, of course not…The trumpet player knew where he was and what he was supposed to be doing and he met his mission in a way that I’m sure would make his fellow Marines very proud. Fifth lesson: Semper fidelis.  Semper fidelis.  To ourselves; to each other; to our passions; to our calling.”

[Read more…]

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