Silence on this Day

Mother, son, mourning father, grave site

I found today’s editorial message in the NY Times to poignantly yet beautifully capture the spirit of today.

“If you listen carefully, you can almost hear the silence at the heart of Memorial Day — the inward turn that thoughts take on a day set aside to honor the men and women who have died in the service of this country.

It is the silence of soldiers who have not yet been, and may never be, able to talk about what they learned in war, the silence of grief so familiar that it feels like a second heartbeat. This is a day for acknowledging, publicly, the private memorial days that lie scattered throughout the year, a day when all the military graves are tended to, even the ones that someone tends to regularly as a way of remembering.

It always seems strange the way the fond, sober gestures of memory coincide with the last flush of spring, while the trees are still lit from within by their chartreuse leaves. The year is still rising, just. And yet it is something you often see recorded in the books and diaries of men and women at war — the sharp interruption of beauty, the moments, hours even, when the vivid tenacity of life itself feels most tangible, even in the midst of death. On a bright, beautiful Memorial Day, you feel, as clearly as you may ever feel, the profound separation between the living and the dead. This is the strangeness of the day, because that separation is a source of both joy and loss. [Read more…]

4:09 am and Inspired: Pandas + Puppies + More…

We’re opening Hump Day with a short one minute clip about Pandas.  (Now who doesn’t just love Panda cubs.)  And then on to my inspiring posts of the week…



From Baltimore, MD, George Amoss Jr. @ The Post Modern Quaker with his post:  The Zen of Quakerism. “If, when I’m feeling a little playful, someone were to ask me to summarize Quakerism in a sentence or two, I might say this: You have a heart. Use it.”

From Blacksburg, VA, Erica Ann Sipes @ Beyond the Notes is a pianist and cellist, who is asked by a graduate trumpet student (a Marine) to serve as his pianist for his recital.  In From Battlefield to Stage:  “The recital began and I was literally bursting with pride by the end.  Was it perfect?  No, of course not…The trumpet player knew where he was and what he was supposed to be doing and he met his mission in a way that I’m sure would make his fellow Marines very proud. Fifth lesson: Semper fidelis.  Semper fidelis.  To ourselves; to each other; to our passions; to our calling.”

[Read more…]

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