Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

Sunday Morning

I don’t know where prayers go,
or what they do.
Do cats pray, while they sleep
half-asleep in the sun?
Does the opossum pray as it
crosses the street?
The sunflowers? The old black oak
growing older every year?
I know I can walk through the world,
along the shore or under the trees,
with my mind filled with things
of little importance, in full
self-attendance.  A condition I can’t really
call being alive.
Is a prayer a gift, or a petition,
or does it matter?
The sunflowers blaze, maybe that’s their way.
Maybe the cats are sound asleep.  Maybe not.

While I was thinking this I happened to be standing
just outside my door, with my notebook open,
which is the way I begin every morning.
Then a wren in the privet began to sing.
He was positively drenched in enthusiasm,
I don’t know why.  And yet, why not.
I wouldn’t persuade you from whatever you believe
or whatever you don’t.  That’s your business.
But I thought, of the wren’s singing, what could this be
if it isn’t a prayer?

~Mary Oliver, “I Happened to Be Standing” from A Thousand Mornings 


Notes: Poem Source: Thank you Make Believe Boutique. Photo: Seb Rogo

Miracle. All of it. (110 sec)


“The art of flying is a short film about “murmurations”: the mysterious flights of the Common Starling. It is still unknown how the thousands of birds are able to fly in such dense swarms without colliding. Every night the starlings gather at dusk to perform their stunning air show. Because of the relatively warm winter of 2014/2015, the starlings stayed in the Netherlands instead of migrating southwards.”

“The Art of Flying” by Jan van IJken


Related Posts: Miracle. All of it.

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

  • Photo: “You couldn’t have! To his fellow seal, this elephant seal seems in shock.” by George Cathcart
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Source: Cherly Jong (Jakarta Pusat, Jakarta, Indonesia)

 

 

Sunday Morning

After a century, humpbacks migrate
again to Queens. They left
due to sewage and white froth

banking the shores from polychlorinated-
biphenyl-dumping into the Hudson
and winnowing menhaden schools.

But now grace, dark bodies of song
return. Go to the seaside—

Hold your breath. Submerge.
A black fluke silhouetted
against the Manhattan skyline …

Our songs will pierce the dark
fathoms. Behold the miracle:

what was once lost
now leaps before you.

~ Rajiv Mohabir, from “Why Whales Are Back in New York City


Notes:

Sunday Morning (108 sec)

Miracle. All of it.

“In this exclusive clip from this Sunday’s Blue Planet II episode, we see Clownfish working together to move a coconut shell, which they will use to lay eggs on. This behaviour has never been filmed before. This is the incredible moment a family of clownfish work together to bring a heavy coconut shell back home. Footage from Blue Planet II shows the fish using all their strength and cunning to move the shell across the ocean floor – – pushing large objects sometimes up to 10 times their own weight – an incredible feat for a tiny fish.  Of course there’s a serious reason for this peculiar behaviour. Clownfish – or anemone fish as they’re also known – need a suitable surface for their mate to lay their eggs on.

The anemone fish is surrounded by danger on the reef but finds refuge among the stinging tentacles of the anemone because it is immune to its poison.

The footage was filmed by producer Jonathan Smith and underwater cameraman Roger Munns using ground-breaking probe cameras. The lenses allowed the team to get right down onto the eye line of the clownfish. In total, the team spent 120 hours filming the fish in order to finally capture their collecting behaviour.”

Source: If you can’t see the video above, find it at Daily Mail.


Notes:

Oh, if I could be more like a tree on this Sunday morning

See how the trees
Reach up and outward
As if their entire existence
Were an elegant gesture of prayer.
See how they welcome the breath of spirit,
In all its visible and invisible forms.
See how the roots reach downward and out,
Embracing the physical,
The body and bones
Of its soul of earth and stone,
Allowing half its life to be sheltered
in the most quiet and secret places.

Oh, if I could be more like a tree on this Sunday morning,
To feel the breath of invisible spirit
Touch me as tenderly as a kiss on the forehead.
If I could courageously and confidently
Dig down into the dark
Where the ground water runs deep,
Where shelter and sanctuary
Can be had and held.

Ah, to be like a tree
With all its bent and unbent places,
A whole and holy thing
From its topmost twigs
To the deepest taproot
To all the good and graceful
Spaces between.

~ Carrie Newcomer, “To Be Like A Tree” from The Beautiful Not Yet: Poems, Essays and Lyrics


Notes:

 

T.G.I.F.: 5:00 PM Bell!


Notes:

  • Source: Daily Mail (via Cheetah Camp).  Tourists spotted the animals grazing in the brush as the wildlife enthusiasts travelled to Maasi Mara in Kenya. After watching the giraffes for about 20 minutes, the tour group watched in awe as the herd crossed the road. Sonali Dudhane, from Lucknow, India, watched as the giant animals dwarfed the two tour vehicles in Africa
  • Related Posts: 5:00 PM Bell
%d bloggers like this: