Wisdom

I was racing back home from the computer store, busily doing my errands, trying to get things done. I noticed a restaurant and shopping center to my right, on the freeway. I’d been curious about this place for almost a year. Today, instead of driving by, I turned off the highway and pulled into the parking lot. I spent the next three hours browsing through the stores filled with antiques, trinkets, and gourmet foods. Then I enjoyed a leisurely dinner—a juicy hamburger and a chocolate malt—at the restaurant before returning home. The stores had always been there; I’d always driven past. Today I stopped, satisfied my curiosity, and enjoyed myself.

It’s easy to spend our lives working toward a goal, convinced that if we could only get there, we’d be truly happy then. Today is the only moment we have. If we wait until tomorrow to be happy, we’ll miss out on the beauty of today.

Have your plans. Set goals.

Let yourself be happy now.

~ Melody Beattie, from “Be Happy Now” & More Language of Letting Go


Photo Credit

Don’t eye the basket of bread; just take it off the table

bread-basket-food

Pamela Druckerman interviews Walter Mischel, a professor of psychology at Columbia, in Learning How to Exert Self-Control:

…Self-control can be taught. Grown-ups can use it to tackle the burning issues of modern middle-class life: how to go to bed earlier, not check email obsessively, stop yelling at our children and spouses, and eat less bread. Poor kids need self-control skills if they’re going to catch up at school.

…Adults can use similar methods of distraction and distancing, he says. Don’t eye the basket of bread; just take it off the table. In moments of emotional distress, imagine that you’re viewing yourself from outside, or consider what someone else would do in your place. When a waiter offers chocolate mousse, imagine that a cockroach has just crawled across it. “If you change how you think about it, its impact on what you feel and do changes,” Mr. Mischel writes.

…He explains that there are two warring parts of the brain: a hot part demanding immediate gratification (the limbic system), and a cool, goal-oriented part (the prefrontal cortex). The secret of self-control, he says, is to train the prefrontal cortex to kick in first.

…Self-control alone doesn’t guarantee success. People also need a “burning goal” that gives them a reason to activate these skills

Read the rest of Druckerman’s column here: Learning How to Exert Self-Control

Find Mischel’s new book at Amazon here: The Marshmellow Test: Mastering Self-Control.


Image Source: Foodspotting

Monday Morning Mantra

begin-William-Wordsworth

 


Source: ArtPropelled

Do you need to change your relationship with food?

nutrition factsAfter another weekend of gorging, this blogger’s posts hit home.  A few choice excerpts from Craig Harper’s top 15: Nutrition for Dummies.

3) If it comes in an exciting range of fluorescent colours, don’t eat it.
4) Nobody accidentally eats cake. Own your choices and your behaviours.
6) Calories consumed in secret count. Your friends might not know but your arse will.
7) If dieting was an effective way to lose weight permanently, nobody would ever diet twice.
8) Don’t confuse ‘what your head wants’ with what your body needs. Your mind is a lying b*tch.
10) If you haven’t had a poo since June, maybe cut back on the processed food. And try a little fibre. Just saying.

 

Then he follows up with another solid post titled: Your Body: One Year From Today – A Question of Change.  A few excerpts:

“…If you’re serious about changing your body, and more importantly, keeping it that way, below you’ll find 12 relevant, valuable and potentially-transformational questions…

[Read more…]

%d bloggers like this: