Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Photographer Franco Banfi and a team of scuba divers were following a pod of sperm whales in Dominica Island when suddenly the large creatures became motionless and began to take a synchronized vertical rest. This strange sleeping position was first discovered only in 2008, when a team of biologists from the UK and Japan drifted into their own group of non-active sperm whales. After studying tagged whales the team learned this collective slumber occurs for approximately 7 percent of the animal’s life, in short increments of just 6-24 minutes.

You can see more of the Switzerland-based photographer’s underwater photography on his website and Instagram

Source: A Photographer Captures the Unusual Way Sperm Whales Sleep via thisiscollosal.com, July 4, 2017)

Thank you Eric.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

guira-cuckoo-bird


Photo: Guira cuckoo (South America) channeling its inner grump at Idaho Falls Zoo by Dee Otter Photographer Deidre Lantz  (via Your Eyes Blaze Out)

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Photograph: Tomas Januska with a photograph from series titled Gravity.  “An instantaneous state of weightlessness lasts for only a moment, which is why I wanted to capture this, driven by curiosity. I was curious to try and capture a person jumping because whatever you would have planned, whatever the outcome you would have expected, you are simply surprised by the final product. The jumping people become strangely similar to each other because they are surviving the same real emotions, as if they have returned from their childhood. On the other hand, they are completely different because in each and every one that emotion appears naturally and live, at the same time differently and in different ways. It’s like a movement in a moment, or a moment in a movement? You can decide…

Januska was born in Kretinga, Lithuania and is now living in London and working as a photographer in the UK.  Find Januska on Instagram or his website.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

The Incan relay system could transport news 150 miles per day. The runners, stationed every 2 miles, would run at top speeds and blow a conch shell to tell the next runner they were arriving. The next runner would fall into step beside them, hear and memorize the message, and then run at top speed to the next messenger. The system was so fast they could carry fresh fish from the Pacific Ocean to the Incan king in the Andes valley of Cuzco – without the fish spoiling.

~ Fun Facts, First News


Notes: Photo: Inca Trail via G Adventures

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

There’s strength in observing one’s miniaturization. That you are insignificant and prone to, and God knows, dumb about a lot. Because doesn’t smallness prime us to eventually take up space? For instance, the momentum gained from reading a great book. After after, sitting, sleeping, living in its consequence. A book that makes you feel, finally, latched on. Or after after we recover from a hike. From seeing fifteenth-century ruins and wondering how Machu Picchu was built when Incans had zero knowledge of the wheel. Smallness can make you feel extra porous. Extra ambitious. Like a small dog carrying an enormous branch clenched in its teeth, as if intimating to the world: Okay. Where to?

~ Durga Chew-Bose, from “Heart Museum” in Too Much and Not the Mood: Essays


Photo: Paul Nicol with Walk Softly. Carry a Big Stick.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

Everything

begins

simply

enough.

~ Durga Chew-Bose, from “Heart Museum” in Too Much and Not the Mood: Essays


Image: Mennyfox55

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

Coffee anyone?


Photo: Patty Maher with Concentric Circles

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Photo by Elke Vogelsang. Don’t miss her Instagram site: wieselblitz or her website: elkevogelsang.com.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

meerkat


Source: Male Mouse Lemur by Malcolm S. Ramsay (via Cheetah Camp). Found only on the island of Madagascar.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Up! Up! Up!

birds-up-rise-fly


Source: Baletnice by Robert via Your Eyes Blaze Out

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