Lightly Child, Lightly.


Notes:

  • “A Cup of Sake Beneath the Cherry Trees” by Owen Gent. Illustration based on the beautiful book a Cup of Sake Beneath the Cherry Trees by Kenko“There was not a sound except for the soft drip of water from a bamboo pipe buried deep in fallen leaves…Moved, I said to myself, ‘One could live like this’”
  • Prior “Lightly child, lightly” Posts? Connect here.
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

 

Autumn

gif-autumn-rain-leaves

Fallen leaves

fall on each other—

rain beats on the rain.

~ Kyōtai, from Haiku: An Anthology of Japanese Poems


Notes: Haiku via soracities. Photo: Rain and Coffee

Mirror, Mirror, on the…

mirror-laura-zalenga

What doleful thing
man has devised!
Standing before it
means standing before oneself.
One who questions in front of it
at once finds himself questioned.
Moreover,
why is it you have to step backward
in order to move farther inside?

Kikuo Takano, “Mirror” in Like Underground Water: The Poetry of Mid-Twentieth Century Japan

 


Notes – Poem via Schonwieder (via 1910). Photo: Laura Zalenga

Oryoki

japanese-garden-brooklyn-fish

“Stay here forever,” said the little girl in the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. We were in the Japanese Pavilion, leaning over the rail to watch the fish.

Cherry blossoms swirled like confetti in the dark water. “No,” said her father. “Gonna see more fish—” and he dragged her away from the ones she was already looking at: their shadowy bodies, their smiling mouths, their multicolored scales. Black and gold and pure albino white; cadmium yellow/charcoal; silver-blue-green-gray. The little girl protested, but her father didn’t listen. “More fish,” he said, as if more and different were always, unquestionably better. More fish. Again more fish.

Oryoki, the Japanese word for a begging bowl, means “just enough.” The Irish word go leor (anglicized as “galore”) also meant “sufficiency,” at least at first, sufficiency being a synonym for plenty. But over time, “plenty” has metastasized into “more than enough,” and finally into “too much.” There is nothing wrong with having “too much of a good thing” on a feast day, or for a celebration. But when one comes to take that “more” for granted, requiring excess on every ordinary day, then its celebratory aspect is destroyed.

“Stay here forever,” said the little girl. All she wanted was to watch the fish: to dissolve into that moment of enchantment.

~ Christian McEwen, “Slow is Beautiful.” From World Enough & Time: On Creativity and Slowing Down


Photo: faungg’s photos with fish in Japanese Garden, Brooklyn Botanical Gardens

Ma

train-sit-rest-pause

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

“We have a word for that in Japanese,” he said. “It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally.”

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

“I don’t think it’s like the pillow word.” He clapped his hands three or four times. “The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness, But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb.”

~ Roger Ebert, from “Hayao Miyazaki Interview,” RogerEbert.com (September 12, 2002)


Credits: Quote – Improve is Easy. Photo by Bruno via Mennyfox55.

Time to, Begin. Move the blood.

gif-hibike-euphonium-breeze-wind-hair

A new place.
Awakened eye
Seeing freshly.
What does that do to
The old blood moving through
Its channels?

~ Naomi Shihab Nye, Fresh from You & Yours


Notes: Poem: Thank you Whiskey River. Gif: bakabt from Sound! Euphonium

Can, feel it…

kazuaki-tanahashi-miracle-moment-present-art-blue

Kazuaki Tanahashi
Miracles of Each Moment, 2014


Kabuki Tanahashi @ brushmind.net – Zen Circles. He was born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian calligraphy at eight international conferences of calligraphy and lettering arts. Also a peace and environmental worker for decades, he is a Fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science. See more of his Zen Circles here.


Source: Precious Things

Water Colors

Japan,photography,

Check out Toshio Shibata’s Mesmerizing Photographs of Water in a slide show of 12 photographs.


SMWI*: Feeling large

totoro-rain-gif


Notes:

  • SMWI* = Saturday morning workout inspiration.
  • For more background on Totoro and the Japanese animation film, connect here and here. “Totoro is a giant, friendly forest spirit. He spends most of his time sleeping in a hole in a tree. He doesn’t speak, instead communicating by loud bellows.” (My family would concur with this description of me excluding friendly spirit part.)
  • Image Source: Implicit-egotist

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Let’s Go People

cartoon-exercise-breathe

Up.
Down.
Breath in.
Breathe Out.


Image Source: thesensualstarfish via hayaomiyazakicartoon.


Tortoro is on the right. (I think.) Totoro is a giant, friendly forest spirit. He spends most of his time sleeping in a hole in a tree. He doesn’t speak, instead communicating by loud bellows that, it seems, only the other Totoros and the Cat Bus can understand. He is very friendly to Mei and Satsuki. He can make trees grow much faster than normal.

My Neighbor Totoro  is a 1988 Japanese animated fantasy film which tells the story of the two young daughters (Satsuki and Mei) of a professor and their interactions with friendly wood spirits in postwar rural Japan. The film won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize and the Mainichi Film Award for Best Film in 1988.

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