Breakfast

Breakfast. Bird catches Fish. Crab holding on to the fish tail. Double Jeopardy! September 12, 2020. 5:35 & 5:45 am. 60° F. Winds: Gusty. The Cove, Stamford, CT

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call. Breakfast!


A pelican caught a fish during feeding time in St. James’s Park in London Wednesday. (Photo: Hannah McKay, wsj.com August 23, 2019)

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Notes:

Miracle. All of it.

“In this exclusive clip from this Sunday’s Blue Planet II episode, we see Clownfish working together to move a coconut shell, which they will use to lay eggs on. This behaviour has never been filmed before. This is the incredible moment a family of clownfish work together to bring a heavy coconut shell back home. Footage from Blue Planet II shows the fish using all their strength and cunning to move the shell across the ocean floor – – pushing large objects sometimes up to 10 times their own weight – an incredible feat for a tiny fish.  Of course there’s a serious reason for this peculiar behaviour. Clownfish – or anemone fish as they’re also known – need a suitable surface for their mate to lay their eggs on.

The anemone fish is surrounded by danger on the reef but finds refuge among the stinging tentacles of the anemone because it is immune to its poison.

The footage was filmed by producer Jonathan Smith and underwater cameraman Roger Munns using ground-breaking probe cameras. The lenses allowed the team to get right down onto the eye line of the clownfish. In total, the team spent 120 hours filming the fish in order to finally capture their collecting behaviour.”

Source: If you can’t see the video above, find it at Daily Mail.


Notes:

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Breakfast!


An Atlantic puffin holds a mouthful of sand eels on the island of Skomer, off the coast of Wales. (wsj.com, Rebecca Naden, Reuters, July 18, 2017)

Oryoki

japanese-garden-brooklyn-fish

“Stay here forever,” said the little girl in the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. We were in the Japanese Pavilion, leaning over the rail to watch the fish.

Cherry blossoms swirled like confetti in the dark water. “No,” said her father. “Gonna see more fish—” and he dragged her away from the ones she was already looking at: their shadowy bodies, their smiling mouths, their multicolored scales. Black and gold and pure albino white; cadmium yellow/charcoal; silver-blue-green-gray. The little girl protested, but her father didn’t listen. “More fish,” he said, as if more and different were always, unquestionably better. More fish. Again more fish.

Oryoki, the Japanese word for a begging bowl, means “just enough.” The Irish word go leor (anglicized as “galore”) also meant “sufficiency,” at least at first, sufficiency being a synonym for plenty. But over time, “plenty” has metastasized into “more than enough,” and finally into “too much.” There is nothing wrong with having “too much of a good thing” on a feast day, or for a celebration. But when one comes to take that “more” for granted, requiring excess on every ordinary day, then its celebratory aspect is destroyed.

“Stay here forever,” said the little girl. All she wanted was to watch the fish: to dissolve into that moment of enchantment.

~ Christian McEwen, “Slow is Beautiful.” From World Enough & Time: On Creativity and Slowing Down


Photo: faungg’s photos with fish in Japanese Garden, Brooklyn Botanical Gardens

T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week

fish-monster-swallow-gif


Source: thisisnthappiness

Duh!

bird-fish-chart


Source: NY Magazine (8/16/15)

Throwback Thursday: Remember when…

minnow-hands


Source: jaimejustelaphoto

Big Eye Trevally


Here’s my morning meditation. 20,000 to 40,000 big-eye trevally shoal as part of a mating ritual. MUSIC UP.


There are just some things you can’t feel and experience from the comfort of your warm home


Don’t fish? Don’t like fishing? Don’t care about fishing? No worries. This short film is so much bigger than that.

…It’s easy to stay inside when the weather isn’t pleasant.  Sometimes convincing yourself to get out is the hardest part. And once you’re out, it’d easy to find an excuse to quit. But there are just some things you can’t see from the inside of your house. Some things you can’t feel and experience from the comfort of your warm home. Things your high definition TV can’t give justice to.

The woods are silent. And the water abandoned by the crowds who surrender to the cold. You fully appreciate the stream you fish, when you see it cycle through all its seasons. The dense thick green canopy is gone. And the stream runs crisp clean and bright. The sun touches water it only reaches a few month a year.

The pain of frozen extremities fades fast when you hook that first fish. And all of the sudden, it all seems worth it. You forget about all of your problems. You forget about the ice in your guides. The frozen hands. The problems at home. Troubles at work. It all fades.

At the end of a cold day of fishing you end up much more thankful than when began. Thankful for the motivation to get up and get out.  Thankful for the lessons of the day.  Thankful for the fish you may have been blessed with. And thankful to return home to the things outside of fishing.”


She has a heartbeat. She dances with the winds and the grass.


Deep in the belly of these vermillion walls
Our minds open to adventure and experience.
We squint to the back of our lenses
And down to the tips of our fly lines
Crossing paths and coming together to tell a story.

This place is home to the blood of this land.
An emerald green water full of life, and full of hope.
She’s had a long journey.
Thousands of miles she’s travelled.
Veining her way through rock and crevice.
Rugged and raw to bless us with her fertile waters.
A place painted by Gods and carved by time.
A mighty river and a mighty canyon in the land of the Navajo.

Her currents meander over stone and sand
In a rhythm uniquely her own
Her color unlike anything else
Her glimmer, mesmerizing.

She has a heartbeat.
She dances with the winds and the grass.
She dances with life and we’ve come for what’s beneath it all.
A spirit.
A trout.
A memory.
In this box of trickery,
a shimmer of gold.
A subtle twist of thread and wire.
A hook.
A fly.
The trout we seek are strong and smart.
A worthy test of our skills.
Our tactics and presentations must be perfect.
The throw of our line must gently lay on the waters’ currents.
This is what we’ve come for, and what we live for.
Our search for the perfect riffle.
The rise of a hungry trout.
Friendships and memories.
This is an unforgettable place,
Where the earth and the heavens come together.

There is life, warmth and beauty everywhere up here.
360 degrees of pure magic.
Around every turn our lens capture the light and the dark of it all.
A Father and Son.
Old friends.
A lone fisherman.
The love for nature and art.
And blurring the lines in between.
We now see life, light and shadow
in a different way than we did before.
And we walk away
without leaving a trace of our modern trappings.
While this gold piece of the natural world
has left an indelible mark
on our all of spirits.

 


T.G.I.F.: Chillin’, minding my own business, and…

cool-gif-bird-fish-camera

What’s that coming?
Looks cool.
Looks neat.
OMG!


Kingfisher diving for fish from themetapicture.com

It’s about finding that perfect balance

After chores were done, Saturdays were for fishing.  Not fly fishing but rod, reel and bait fishing on the Columbia or Kootenay Rivers.  This one minute clip rolled the memories back.  Whether you fish or not, this clip puts you in the driver’s seat of the magic.  The solitude. The oneness with nature.  Here’s “Stream of Dreams.”

Streams of Dreams from Almost Blue on Vimeo.


Source: ThomasandThomas.com – Tangled Lines

I’m not one. But this stopped me in my tracks today…

Vibrant Produce

“The risk of hospitalization or death from heart disease is 32% lower in vegetarians than people who eat meat and fish, according to a new study from the University of Oxford.

Heart disease is the single largest cause of death in developed countries…The new findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggest that a vegetarian diet could significantly reduce people’s risk of heart disease…This is the largest study ever conducted in the UK comparing rates of heart disease between vegetarians and non-vegetarians. The analysis looked at almost 45,000 volunteers from England and Scotland…of whom 34% were vegetarian. Such a significant representation of vegetarians is rare in studies of this type, and allowed researchers to make more precise estimates of the relative risks between the two groups.”

Source: University of Oxford


Image Credit

Now let me tell you a story about the fish I caught…

yellowfin tuna


“This yellowfin tuna caught by John Petruescu in Mexican waters is expected to become the largest yellowfin tuna ever caught on rod and reel…459 pounds. Petruescu’s tuna cannot qualify as a world record because a deckhand briefly grabbed the rod at the bow to help manage the tuna around the anchor. ‘Had we known how big it was obviously we would have let him try to do that himself.'”


Source: GrindTV.com

Cousin Billy


Saturdays during my childhood were spent playing with our cousins.  Or fishing.

Billy was the oldest by a year. Like his Dad, he was built to run and had a spiritual connection with nature. With ease, Billy filled his match box with grasshoppers (for fish bait) while we stumbled around with the creatures making a mockery of us.

We’d grab our fishing poles and race our bikes to the Kootenay River.  Billy would bound ahead from rock to rock. With grace.  Like an Aboriginal Tracker.  Quiet. Surefooted. No energy wasted.

The rest of us were in pursuit.  Jimmy’s arms and legs flying. Baby fat rhythmically swinging up and down with each stride.  Sweating profusely. Screaming at us to “wait up.” 

[Read more…]

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call – Breakfast!

http://opticoverload.tumblr.com/post/27718606045/triple-kill-the-kingfisher-makes-a-perfect-dive


“The Kingfisher makes a perfect dive at 100 km/hr into the little frozen hole in Germany to catch fish for food.  This amazing moment captured by photographer Gisela Delpho.”

Source: goodmemory via opticoverload

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How do you breathe?

Whether you love, hate or are indifferent about fly fishing, I’ll bet this clip takes your pulse up and then quickly down to a calm, peaceful state in less than two minutes…



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