World Re-opening…


Art by Gürbüz Doğan Ekşioğl, (from Istanbul, Turkey). Françoise Mouly: “When coronavirus quarantines were announced, more than a year ago, artists began sending in sketches about our new, locked-in reality. One of those sketches, from Gürbüz Doğan Ekşioğlu, who is based in Istanbul, looked far ahead, imagining the thrill and poignancy of a world reopening. Today, the pandemic is far from over, but many countries are finally exhaling, and it seemed apt to publish Ekşioğlu’s image.”

T.G.I.F. Nope. Mr. Bingo.

Nope, Mr Bingo (via thisisn’thappiness)

the act of looking out the window

When trapped indoors, the act of looking out the window can become a simple, nearly sublime pleasure. We talked to the cartoonist Tom Gauld about his latest cover for the magazine…

Do you have any favorite sights outside your window?

It’s nice to see more of my neighbors as they walk along the street—usually, many of them would be at work all day. And, when I take walks, I see a lot more people sitting by their front windows, often working on a laptop. The idea for this cover started when I walked past a building and noticed that there was a figure in almost every one of the windows. I tried to imagine an everyday event that might attract the attention of everyone in a building.

Do you have a dog, and, if you don’t, do you envy those who do?

I don’t have a dog, and really I’m more of a cat person, but I do see the appeal of a dog. It’s nice to have a reason to go out for a walk (or two) every day. I usually walk in the park with my younger daughter before she starts her online-school day, and almost everyone else is out there walking a dog. The dogs always seem very happy.

— Françoise Mouly, excerpts from her interview of Tom Gauld on his magazine cover titled “Captive Audience” in The New Yorker, March 15, 2021

Truth


Source: Hartley Lin (formerly known by the pseudonym Ethan Rilly) is a cartoonist based in Montreal, Canada. Young Frances, the first collection from his ongoing comic book Pope Hats, won the 2019 Doug Wright Award for Best Book. He has drawn for The New Yorker, The Hollywood Reporter, Slate, Taddle Creek and HarperCollins. (via thisisn’thappiness)

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Thank you Carrie for sharing. Photo Source: Global Voices

 

Work From Home


Illustrator: Daniel Padure (via thisisn’thappiness)

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

In your house for days on end,
Hours, minutes, weeks all blend.
Boredom, hunger, Tiger King.
Food depleted, you need some things.
And though I shouldn’t need to ask,
When you go out, please wear a mask.


Source: covidbookcovers

Saturday Forecast: 55° F / Breezy


The New Yorker Cover: “Blown Away,” by Tomer Hanuka.

“The cover for this year’s Spring Style Issue is the fourth by Tomer Hanuka, an Israeli artist known for his striking use of color.

Q: We like the gestural quality of the woman’s pose. How does body language factor into making an image like this?

“I start with a gesture, just a line, and build a story around it. There are so many rules about drawing anatomy, and sometimes you need to break all of them to make a pose work. An image like this begins with a realistic sketch of a body, but in the end I want the physicality to disappear. I want the reader to be left only with an idea or a feeling.”

What’s it like to be a human the bird asked

What’s it like to be a human
the bird asked

I myself don’t know
it’s being held prisoner by your skin
while reaching infinity
being a captive of your scrap of time
while touching eternity
being hopelessly uncertain
and helplessly hopeful
being a needle of frost
and a handful of heat
breathing in the air
and choking wordlessly
it’s being on fire
with a nest made of ashes
eating bread
while filling up on hunger
it’s dying without love
it’s loving through death

That’s funny said the bird
and flew effortlessly up into the air

~ Anna Kamienska, from “Funny


Notes: Poem via Alive on All Channels. (Thanks Beth). Art by Klára Piknerová (via Your Eyes Blaze Out)

About right…


The New Yorker Magazine

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