The dawn-wind stirs through the ancient cottonwoods

Colorado, Cache La Poudre River

There are some who can live without wild things
and some who cannot . . .
when the dawn-wind stirs through the ancient cottonwoods,
and the gray light steals down from the hills
over the old river sliding softly past its wide brown sandbars –
what if there be no more goose music?

~ Aldo Leopold, Sand County Almanac


Notes:

Lightly child, lightly

gif-float-water-swimming

I let it go.
It’s like swimming against the current.
It exhausts you.
After a while, whoever you are,
you just have to let go,
and the river brings you home.

Joanne Harris, Five Quarters of the Orange 


Notes:

  • Credit: Quote – Sweet Senderipity. Image Source: mennyfox55
  • Prior “Lightly child, lightly” Posts? Connect here.
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

Sunday Morning: Taste it

morning-sunrise-river
When you are a young person, you are like a young creek, and you meet many rocks, many obstacles and difficulties on your way. You hurry to get past these obstacles and get to the ocean. But as the creek moves down through the fields, it becomes larger and calmer and it can enjoy the reflection of the sky. It’s wonderful. You will arrive at the sea anyway so enjoy the journey. Enjoy the sunshine, the sunset, the moon, the birds, the trees, and the many beauties along the way. Taste every moment of your daily life.

– Thich Nhat Hanh 


Sources: Photograph: Peter in Buscot, England, UK. Quote: Thank you Karen @ Tearinyourhand

 

Morning Meditation

butterfly-gif

In a life properly lived, you’re a river. You touch things lightly or deeply; you move along because life herself moves, and you can’t stop it…

~ Jim Harrison

 


Source: Thank you THISISEVERYTHING

There are just some things you can’t feel and experience from the comfort of your warm home


Don’t fish? Don’t like fishing? Don’t care about fishing? No worries. This short film is so much bigger than that.

…It’s easy to stay inside when the weather isn’t pleasant.  Sometimes convincing yourself to get out is the hardest part. And once you’re out, it’d easy to find an excuse to quit. But there are just some things you can’t see from the inside of your house. Some things you can’t feel and experience from the comfort of your warm home. Things your high definition TV can’t give justice to.

The woods are silent. And the water abandoned by the crowds who surrender to the cold. You fully appreciate the stream you fish, when you see it cycle through all its seasons. The dense thick green canopy is gone. And the stream runs crisp clean and bright. The sun touches water it only reaches a few month a year.

The pain of frozen extremities fades fast when you hook that first fish. And all of the sudden, it all seems worth it. You forget about all of your problems. You forget about the ice in your guides. The frozen hands. The problems at home. Troubles at work. It all fades.

At the end of a cold day of fishing you end up much more thankful than when began. Thankful for the motivation to get up and get out.  Thankful for the lessons of the day.  Thankful for the fish you may have been blessed with. And thankful to return home to the things outside of fishing.”


We Say Everything Comes Back

waves, dark, blue, shoreline, beach, rock

“We say you cannot divert the river from the river bed. We say that everything is moving, and we are a part of this motion. That the soil is moving. That the water is moving. We say that the earth draws water to her from the clouds. We say the rainfall parts on each side of the mountain, like the parting of our hair, and that the shape of the mountain tells where the water has passed. We say this water washes the soil from the hillsides, that the rivers carry sediment, that rain when it splashes carries small particles, that the soil itself flows with water in streams underground. We say that water is taken up into roots of plants, into stems, that it washes down hills into rivers, that these rivers flow to the sea, that from the sea, in the sunlight, this water rises to the sky, that this water is carried in clouds, and comes back as rain, comes back as fog, back as dew, as wetness in the air.

We say everything comes back.”

Susan Griffin


Source: moody blues by Andy Kennelly on Flickr via Sundaug.

Related Posts:

 

Sunday Morning: Home

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My Brother Lorne sent me a link to Douglas Noblet’s Wild Air Photography site.  We grew up in the Kootenays in Southeastern, British Columbia, Canada.  Douglas’ pictures left me in wonder.  As a child growing up, you don’t fully appreciate what is out your back door.  Doug’s awesome photographs make my heart swell with pride and leave me inspired.  About earth.  About nature.  About home.  Good Sunday morning. [Read more…]

6:12 a.m. Now. Winter Solstice Commences.

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Click For Audio (“Snowstorm 1814” by Shady Bard From the Album “First The Winter)


Sources: Date/time start of winter. The Farmers Almanac.  Sources & Credits for these photo shares (and many other winter photos) can be accessed with a Tumblr account @ dkwinter.  Yes, that is our Zeke – in the third photo – his first winter – with snow on his nose.

Saturday Morning Work-Out Inspiration: “Move”

“Move” was shot in Victoria, British Columbia, my home province.

MOVE – A (very) Short Film About Trail Running from Darcy Turenne on Vimeo.


Related Posts:

Nature’s Color Explosion (A Slideshow…)

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click for audio (“Woods” by George Winston From His Album “Autumn)


Sources & Credits for these shares (and many other autumn photos) can be accessed with a Tumblr account @ dkfalllights. Thank you Rob Firchau @ The Hammock Papers for the music inspiration.

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