Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

eric-rose-light-face-portrait

An early riser, an optimist by nature, a lover of mornings, I’m always eager to launch myself into the day. And it doesn’t take much to make me happy: A cup of strong coffee laced with cream or a handful of frozen blueberries from my summer-stash in the freezer, a silly joke shared with my husband, a good-morning text from a far-away friend, the hairy woodpecker hanging upside-down at the feeder, busily extracting his morning ration of sunflower seeds, a sky fluid with traveling clouds executing their own sublime choreography, or a soft grey mantle of mist draped across the nearby hills. Looking around at the life I’m privileged to live, I see much to be grateful for.

~ Katrina Kenison, from Mending the World (Jan 20, 2017)

 


Notes:

 

The Paper Kites


The Paper Kites are an indie folk rock band from Melbourne, Australia. The band was formed in 2010.  Lyrics for this tune Tenenbaum at Genius.com.  Links here for the band’s official web site, Facebook, and their album on iTunes.

T.G.I.F.: Snow Day!

Do NOT quit before the finish…


Thank you Susan

It’s been a long day! (Hit it Moji! Hit it!)

No one’s going to cry for me if you don’t…
If you’ve got a minute,
if you’ve got a space in your heart
Keep my memory
Don’t let me fall behind, no, no, don’t let me fall behind…


Notes:

 

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call (Bill Withers, A Whole Person)

“My father was this coal miner, but he was always interested in reading. Never got a chance to go to school. But he read. And, you know, dignity was very important to him. The first thing that I had to resolve in my life and the one thing that was very important to me, I had to sort this out: ‘Can I go into this thing and avoid the minstrel-ness of it?’ This is a business. And you got some cold pimps that will mail you out until you die in your grave. You got as many thieves in this stuff… There’s a life you have to run. And you do the best you can. And hopefully, as a human being, you improve. I’m 70-years-old. I’m not some kind of mindless troubadour. You know? I have an intellect I have to manage, I have some thoughts I have to manage, I have a life I have to maintain. I want to know where my stuff is. You know? I want to know who I am. I don’t want to be some simple-minded blues boy. You can bleep this out: ‘Kiss my ass with that shit.’ So I’m doing the best I can. To grow and improve my lineage as a species. So I got some responsibilities that require that I be available. I never had the benefit of a formal education, but I’ve always wanted to better myself. I can speak the language. I can write it, make it rhyme for you, if you want to. You know what I mean? Somebody said, “Education is the sum total of what you know.” That’s everything from tying your shoe to whether you can do quadratic equations or not. So, I’m not saying this should be a template for everybody, but that’s just the kind of person that makes sense for me to be. Hopefully the music that I made is useful to somebody. I mean, I get nice letters from people that say, ‘Hey man, my grandmother died, and the song helped me.’ I like that kind of stuff. As a result, it was important to me, as best I could, to try to wind up with a life that had some stability and some dignity in it… I made some choices earlier… that I wanted to be a whole person. Not just this entertainer thing. It doesn’t fill up my plate. I love it — who wouldn’t like it? But it doesn’t fill up my plate.”

Bill Withers, on why he walked away from the music business in 1985 in an Interview on The Sound of Young America


Notes:

Satisfaction: You take it on the road for 50 years and get the hang of it (50 sec)

Q:   This never gets old to you?

Keith Richards: No. No. It gets more interesting actually. The weird thing is that every time I play “Satisfaction”, I’m finding new ways, just a little lick here and a little lick there, and I wish we would have put that on the record, but the fact is that the way things go, you wrote songs and five days later you’ve recorded it. You barely know the thing. And then you take it on the road for 50 years and I’m starting to get the hang of it now.


Need a fix, find The Rolling Stones music video here:  “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

Mr. Church could have been anything he wanted to be. He chose to cook.

This flick has been hammered (trashed) by the critics (e.g., Rogerebert.com or Variety.com) but loved by its audience – 83% of Amazon reviewers loved it.

I say Bah Hum Bug to the critics!  “Sugary Sweet Fantasy” perhaps, but it’s the season. Sit with your family over the holidays and watch this Disney-like flick.

Find it on Amazon Video: Mr. Church

Jackie

jackie-movie-natalie-portman

Ms. Portman’s Jackie is a mesmerizing presence. She is stiff the way celebrated women were in the early 1960s, in her comportment as well as her hair. […]

Natalie Portman’s portrait of Jacqueline Kennedy during and immediately after her husband’s assassination rises above impersonation to an eerie kind of incarnation: She’s got the voice, the look and a devastated spirit that still has plenty of steel…For those who remember exactly where they were when the news came in, some of these blood-soaked images retain the power to evoke astonishingly strong feelings of shock and grief. This is by way of saying I may have seen a different “Jackie” than others will see, one that made me recoil at replayed moments of horror, and sometimes squirm like a voyeur. But Pablo Larraín has made a strangely conflicted film that portrays Jackie as an obsessive mythmaker and keeper of the flame—an ironic, provocative approach—yet celebrates the Camelot myth in the process. […]

Does it also feel right that the film, following Jackie back to the White House after the flight from Dallas, tracks her solitary wanderings through silent, empty rooms and into the shower, where she washes her husband’s dried blood from her body? No and yes. Some of that left me feeling queasy, an accessory to a break-in on an icon’s privacy. All the same, following her in the hours after the assassination is a terrific idea for part of a movie, a part that’s irresistible to watch…

The film’s contradictions intersect most vividly toward the end, when Jackie, passing a department store in a limousine, sees mannequins in a succession of windows wearing her signature dresses. That could also be taken as ironic—the architect of the image-building project has become its surviving subject. But the scene, like so much in the film, plays sentimentally. She is ruefully, tragically alone…

~ Joe Morgenstern, excerpts from ‘Jackie’ Review: The Woman and the MythNatalie Portman stars as Jacqueline Kennedy in the period during and after her husband’s assassination

To watch official movie trailer: Jackie, Official Trailer


Photo: traileraddict.com

Start your day here (120 sec)

Buster’s X-Mas Present: 15,893,685 views, and counting.


Thank you Susan

 

 

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