Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

You really don’t have to lose everything and travel to a remote valley to discover that the world is always rushing forward to teach us, and that the greatest thing we can do is stand there, open and available, and be taught by it. There is no limit to what this cracked and broken and achingly beautiful world can offer, and there is equally no limit to our ability to meet it.

Each day, the sun rises and we get out of bed. Another day has begun and bravely, almost recklessly, we stagger into it not knowing what it will bring to us. How will we meet this unpredictable, untamable human life? How will we answer its many questions and challenges and delights? What will we do when we find ourselves, stumble over ourselves, encounter ourselves, once again, in the kitchen?

~ Dana Velden, Finding Yourself in the Kitchen: Kitchen Meditations and Inspired Recipes from a Mindful Cook (Rodale Books, September 8, 2015)


Notes:

  • Quote source – Thank you Catherine @ beyondthefieldsweknow.org. Be sure to check out her blog and her design studio @ The KerrdeLune Design Works.
  • Photo: elenandrevn (via BruWho)
  • Post inspired by Make Believe Boutique: “When the True Self breaks through, a new and impassioned approach to life often makes itself known. We tap into an inner radiance that I call delight. I’m speaking of a unique kind of response to life that can coexist with our most painful realities. I’m speaking of the joy of saying yes to life in the core of our being. I believe that the capacity to delight in life is deeply carved by our waiting.  Delight can become a way of life, a way of journeying. There’s a saying, “Religion is not to be believed, but danced.” I like this idea, as it shifts the emphasis from our endless pursuit of religious knowledge back to the dimension of living our religion in such a way that it becomes a dance, a celebration in which we open our arms and say yes to life. ~ Sue Monk Kidd, “When the Heart Waits. Spiritual Direction for Life’s Sacred Questions”

Dinner (Together)

Q: In your memoir The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen, you talk about the importance of having dinner as a family, having everyone together to discuss the issues of the day.

Jacques Pépin: For me, the kitchen is the center of the house. When a kid comes back from school, you sit down in that kitchen and you do your homework. You hear the voice of your mother, your father, you hear the clink of pots and pans, you see the ingredients, the smells. All of that will stay with you the rest of your life. You know, that becomes very important. For a child just home from school, the kitchen is a great place to be.

~ Don’t miss full interview @ GQ.com: Jacques Pépin  (April 11, 2017)


Sources: Quote – Thank you Harvey @ The Happy Curmudgeon. Photo: L.A. Times

Of course I need one

easter-egg-topper

THE GADGET | The Perfect Breakfast Mate |  The Rösle Egg Topper:

Lovers of soft-boiled eggs and eaters of hard-boiled Easter leftovers, take note: Your lives are about to get a whole lot easier. The German kitchen-accessory maker Rösle has designed a gadget whose sole function (unless you can think of another) is to create a clean, lateral crack in the top of your egg. Place the device on top of a cooked egg, pull the spring-loaded lever as far as it will go and release. Next step: Gently pry the cap of the shell off, exposing the soft interior of the egg. The Egg Topper magically cuts with laser precision, bringing a touch of polish to a humble breakfast. $22, rosleusa.com


Source: wsj: Egg Gadget by Rösle via rosleusa.com

Weekend Roundup…(including The Denali Climb by 5 Wounded Warriors with 4 Good Legs Between Them…)

WEEKEND ROUNDUPHere’s some noteworthy leading, learning & living articles that I came across this week …

Forbes: Intelligence Is Overrated: What You Really Need To Succeed. “Albert Einstein’s was estimated at 160, Madonna’s is 140, and John F. Kennedy’s was only 119, but as it turns out, your IQ score pales in comparison with your EQ, MQ, and BQ scores when it comes to predicting your success and professional achievement.”

(((Note to Tom Hood: Thanks for sharing.  Thank goodness Intelligence research is moving in my direction. Smile )))


WSJ: Mom Was Right: Go Outside. “Children spend more than 4 hours a day with technology and there’s no longer time for nature…latest research – untamed landscapes have a restorative effect, calming our frazzled nerves…after a brief exposure to the outdoors, people are more creative, happier and better able to focus.” 

(((Note: And here I sit, inside, banging away on keyboard.  Hmmmmm.)))

[Read more…]

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