Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

Freud, one of the grand masters of narrative, knew that the past is not fixed in the way that linear time suggests. We can return. We can pick up what we dropped. We can mend what others broke.

Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? (Grove Press, March 6, 2012) 


Portrait: CCCB

Lightly Child, Lightly

“If the sun is shining, stand in it

– yes, yes, yes.”

~ Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?


Notes:

  • Quote: Thank you Whiskey River. Photo by Susan Kanigan (South Beach, Miami, 2017)
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

Lightly child, lightly.

What is it that I have to tell myself again and again?
That there is always a new beginning, a different end.
I can change the story.
I am the story.
Begin.

~ Jeanette Winterson, The PowerBook

 


Notes:

  • Quote Source: Who are you really, wanderer?. Photo: pann-  with standpauke (via Newthom)
  • Prior “Lightly child, lightly” Posts? Connect here.
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

The important things are learned in faces,
in gestures,
not in our locked tongues.
The true things are too big or too small,
or in any case always the wrong size
to fit in the template called language.

~ Jeanette Winterson, Lighthousekeeping (Harvest Books, 2006)


Notes:

It’s been a long day

woman,tired,fatigue,photography,drawing,

The body shuts down
when it has too much to bear;
goes its own way quietly inside,
waiting for a better time,
leaving you numb and half alive.

~ Jeanette Winterson, from The Passion


Notes:

There it is; the light across the water.

black and white photography, family, portrait

“There it is; the light across the water. Your story. Mine. His. It has to be seen to be believed. And it has to be heard. In the endless babble of narrative, in spite of the daily noise, the story waits to be heard.

Some people say that the best stories have no words. It is true that words drop away, and that the important things are often left unsaid. The important things are learned in faces, in gestures, not in our locked tongues. The true things are too big or too small, or in any case always the wrong size to fit in the template called language.”

– Jeanette Winterson


Fall to your knees. Today.

dancer,painting,whimsy

“They say that every snowflake is different. If that were true, how could the world go on? How could we ever get up off our knees? How could we ever recover from the wonder of it?”

~ Jeanette Winterson


Bio: Jeanette Winterson, 53, is a writer, journalist and delicatessen owner. She was born in Manchester, England, and adopted by Pentecostal parents who brought her up in the nearby mill-town of Accrington. Intending to become a Pentecostal Christian missionary, she began evangelising and writing sermons at age six. As a Northern working class girl she was not encouraged to be clever. Her adopted father was a factory worker, her mother stayed at home. There were only six books in the house, including the Bible and Cruden’s Complete Concordance to the Old and New Testaments. Strangely, one of the other books was Malory’s Morte d’Arthur, and it was this that started her life quest of reading and writing. The house had no bathroom either, which was fortunate because it meant that Jeanette could read her books by flashlight in the outside toilet. Reading was not much approved unless it was the Bible. Her parents intended her for the missionary field. Schooling was erratic but Jeanette had got herself into a girl’s grammar school and later she read English at Oxford University. While she took her A levels she lived in various places, supporting herself by evening and weekend work. In a year off to earn money, she worked as a domestic in a lunatic asylum.

Credits: Image – Thank you HungarianSoul. Quote: Thank you Whiskey River. Jeanette Winterson Bio @ this link and Wiki.

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