WORD!

calvin-hobbes


Notes: Source: Calvin and Hobbes @itspeteski via this isn’t happiness. Title: “Word” internet slang definition.

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

dog-pet-funny-tgif-t-g-i-f


Source: via Nini Poppins

Zephyr (ZƐF ƏR)

breeze-legs

ZEPHYR (ZƐF ƏR), noun.

Deemed one of the most beautiful words in the English language due to its euphony, rare sighting and letter composition, Zephyr is described as a gentle, mild breeze. It does not disrupt, nor cause chaos, it merely brings a pleasant sensation on a warm summer day.

 


Notes: Definition source: Words N Quotes. Photo: Here’s to the crazy ones (Breeze by Igor Egorov)

Now

do-now-action


Source: Thegoodvibe.com

5:00 P.M. Bell: What’s that smell? Weekend!

larajoregan7-dog-car-breeze-pet-cute


Source: mymodernmet.com

Opia


opia – n. the ambiguous intensity of looking someone in the eye, which can feel simultaneously invasive and vulnerable–their pupils glittering, bottomless and opaque–as if you were peering through a hole in the door of a house, able to tell that there’s someone standing there, but unable to tell if you’re looking in or looking out.


Word, Please

tired-fatigue-woman-portrait

Your body aches.
You can feel yourself sighing all the way to your knees.
Now tell me:
what is the word for that.

— shinji-moon, from A Physician’s Handbook


Notes: Photography:maja via eikadan. Quotes: tohs–kah

 

 

Saturday Morning. And, I’ve got Clinomania

gif-sleep-weekend-saturday

gif-sleep-tired-weekend-saturday-1

“(noun) Defined as an overwhelming desire to stay in bed, clinomania is at its peak during chilly, autumn and snowy days, as well as during the peaceful, rainy afternoons of summer. Chances are when clinomania strikes, your only wish is to stay in bed, rest, and catch up on your favorite tv series and go on a Netflix binge! Many of us who experience clinomania usually find it difficult to get up in the mornings. We look forward to the weekends and despise Monday mornings.”

  • etymology: New Latin: clin, Greek:klinei (to lean)+ mania (madness/frenzy)

Notes: Word Definition Source: Words N Quotes. Gif: Violent Waves of Emotion (Le Petit Soidat 1963 Dir Jean-Luc Goddard with Anna Karina)

 

Saturday Susurrus

fall-autumn-leaves
  “susurrus [soo-suruhs]”

— (noun) As one of the most beautiful words in the English language, susurrusis defined as a soft, murmuring sound. It resembles the rustling symphony of the fallen leaves moving across the pavement or the whispers created by the branches of the trees on a windy, autumn day. Uttering susurrus also simulates the acoustics of nature’s effect; this is one of those rare words where its aesthetic, sound and feel coincide beautifully.


Credits: Photograph: Béatrice Lechtanski via Art Propelled. Quote: Thank you Rudy @ Et in Arcadia Ego*

Word

black and white, photography

You are looking for the “right” word.

For a paper, an article, a story, a blog post, a presentation – – you’re trying to express a intense moment, a feeling, an emotion.

Words, sentences, paragraphs, a continuous stream flowing…your back and forth rhythm now rudely interrupted. You have hit The Wall. You can’t climb over without the Word.

It’s right there. On the tip of your tongue. Your mind is searching. You feel the Word. It’s Sizzling, Searing. The perfect Word to capture the moment, the feeling.

Yet, you come up Empty.

Your frustration grows. You use a substitute. You re-read the passage again, and again. The Word doesn’t fit. It doesn’t feel right. It’s an impostor. You go with it anyway. And it hangs, like an ill-fitting jacket or pair of oversized shoes.

Suppose we try to recall a forgotten name. The state of our consciousness is peculiar. There is a gap therein; but no mere gap. It is a gap that is intensely active. A sort of wraith of the name is in it, beckoning us in a given direction, making us at moments tingle with the sense of our closeness, and then letting us sink back without the longed-for term. If wrong names are proposed to us, this singularly definite gap acts immediately so as to negate them. They do not fit into its mould. And the gap of one word does not feel like the gap of another, all empty of content as both might seem necessarily to be when described as gaps. . . . The rhythm of a lost word may be there without a sound to clothe it; or the evanescent sense of something which is the initial vowel or consonant may mock us fitfully, without growing more distinct. Every one must know the tantalizing effect of the blank rhythm of some forgotten  verse, restlessly dancing in one’s mind, striving to be filling out with words.

William James, 1890

And, then you read a poem that captures this, all of this.

Magic.

She’s gone and done it.
[Read more…]

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