Lunette


Mesmerizing…

Sunday Morning: Loki


“Kelly Lund adopted Loki in 2012, he had no idea that the life and love he shared with this husky/arctic wolf/malamute mix would lead to full-blown Instagram stardom. What began as a personal mission to enter Loki’s canine world and give him the life he was meant to enjoy outside quickly somersaulted into an international movement to experience the world with man’s best friend.”

Find the full Loki story here: Loki the Wolfdog

Find more photos at his instagram account here: loki_the_wolfdog

I fought the wolves of patience

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[…]

I fought the wolves of patience
just to let it lie down.

See these waters they’ll pull you up,
Oh if you’re bolder than the darkness.
My my, let these songs be an instrument to cut,
Oh spaces ‘tween the happiness and the hardness […]

What we found
Down these roads that wander as lost as the heart,
Is a chance to breathe again, a chance for a fresh start…

~ Ben Howard, These Waters


Sources:

It’s the alpha female who really runs the show

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Excerpts from “Tapping Your Inner Wolf” by Carl Safina:

[…] If you watch wolves, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that perhaps no two species are more alike behaviorally than wolves and humans. Living as we do in families, we can easily recognize the social structures and status quests in wolf packs. No wonder Native Americans recognized in wolves a sibling spirit.

The similarities between male wolves and male humans can be quite striking. Males of very few other species help procure food year-round for the entire family, assist in raising their young to full maturity and defend their packs year-round against others of their species who threaten their safety. Male wolves appear to stick more with that program than their human counterparts do.

Biologists used to consider the alpha male the undisputed boss. But now they recognize two hierarchies at work in wolf packs — one for the males, the other for the females.

Doug Smith, the biologist who is the project leader for the Yellowstone Gray Wolf Restoration Project, said the females “do most of the decision making” for the pack, including where to travel, when to rest and when to hunt. The matriarch’s personality can set the tone for the whole pack, Dr. Smith said.

Or, as Mr. McIntyre put it: “It’s the alpha female who really runs the show.”

Clearly, our alpha male stereotype could use a corrective makeover. Men can learn a thing or two from real wolves: less snarl, more quiet confidence, leading by example, faithful devotion in the care and defense of families, respect for females and a sharing of responsibilities. That’s really what wolfing up should mean.

Carl Safina is the founder of the Safina Center on nature at Stony Brook University and the author of the forthcoming book “Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel.”


Photography: FragileHeartxxx

Big Bad Wolf?

A road in the woods.  Three sheep.  Big Bad Wolf approaches.  Plot for bad outcome.   Or made for TV Grimm’s Fairy Tale.  Watch this short clip.  I actually felt bad for this wolf.  Believe this wolf made need some therapy.


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