On Swimming…


…hold a fabric of silence so fine
and old that even a breath
could tear it.
I love to swim in the sea, which keeps
talking to itself
in the monotone of a vagabond
who no longer recalls
exactly how long he’s been on the road.
Swimming is like a prayer:
palms join and part,
join and part, almost without end.

~ Adam Zagajewski, from “On Swimming” from Without End: New and Selected Poems.


Notes: Poem via 3 Quarks Daily.  Art by Samantha French

It’s hot. It’s time.

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chocolate-vanilla-ice-cream-art

“Pennsylvania native Oriana Kacicek, 29, spent her early years in a nurturing environment of great art, dance, music and literature. Inspired and encouraged by her mother, also a painter, she began painting and drawing at the age of one and continued the practice throughout her teenage years. Influenced by the light and color of the European Impressionist and Dutch painters, Oriana’s hyper-realist style is infused with wit and energy. “I’ve discovered that all art forms are fundamentally the same; they are about revealing truth and beauty, demand the utmost in time and attention, and must be grounded in good technique. I aspire to create paintings that are full of joy, color and light.” (Source: Oriana Kacicek)


Source: My Modern Met

 

Zener

art,swimming,under water,pool

hyperrealism,art,swim,swimming,relax,

My work is about psychological turning points and transformations and risk, taking that proverbial leap of faith, balanced with that quest for finding refuge, finding quietness and stillness and escapism. Some [paintings] are very, very introspective escapism. Some are just the joy, the pool full of people in this temporary oasis. The 10 minutes when you hit the water for the first time and the smell of sun tan lotion hits your nose. You really don’t think about anything for those first few minutes…Water has been the source of a variety of narratives that appeal to many people: spiritual and physical renewal, cleansing one’s soul, taking the plunge and nostalgic memories of play and fun from childhood…Another popular theme of Zener’s paintings are the businessmen on tightropes who embody a tension that many of us feel and can relate to immediately. As many question whether the subject is falling or hanging on, Zener likes to respond, “The only way not to fall is to keep on moving…”

~ Eric Zener

See more art by Eric Zener @: ericzener.com


Source: EscapeintoLife.com

Yoro

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The New York City-based artist, Sean Yoro, who goes by Hula, produces hyperrealistic murals of woman from his paddle board. He’s seen bobbing along the current, one hand steadying himself as he adds fine details and decorative tattoos to the ladies’ skin. Hula paints his subjects at the water’s edge on unassuming concrete walls. Part of their heads and shoulders are shown, but the rest of them seemingly exists below sea level. It’s as if these larger-than-life women are taking a leisurely dip. Their placement also has a mirroring effect and allows their portraits to extend beyond the wall. On the water, they appear in an opposing style – fractured and abstract. Hula grew up on the island of Oahu in Hawaii and spent a lot of time on the water.”

Be sure to check out his portfolio of work at Hula.com or on Instagram.


Source: My Modern Met

 

 

Eat. Drink. One Woman.

lee-price-painting-breakfast-tub

Emily McCombs on Lee Price: Eat. Drink. One Woman:

If you look quickly at Lee Price’s hyperrealistic paintings, you might mistake them for photographs. But the 44-year-old upstate–New York artist would rather you focus on the subject matter than the technique, which is, for the most part, women and food. Price, who studied painting at Philadelphia’s Moore College of Art, has a long held fascination with the intersection of these two subjects, inspired by her own experience. “The food thing came up because I’ve had issues with food ever since I was very young, and body image issues. I was always very thin but always trying to lose weight,” she says. “They’re very personal paintings.” In fact, the images—bird’s-eye views of women surrounded by luscious-looking desserts or the crumpled wrappers of a junk-food binge—are all self- portraits, painted from photographs of the artist. The life-size works show Price, often nude or in underwear, in unusual eating situations, like sprawled across a bed shoving a pastry in her mouth or crouched in the bath tub holding a full pie. On one level, her work is about compulsivity: the aerial view is meant to conjure the sensation of watching oneself engage in a compulsive behavior and being unable to stop it. That aspect seems to resonate for many— Price often hears her work referred to as “binge paintings” or “bulimia paintings.” But she asserts that the images of women in repose surrounded by unrestricted portions of decadent treats can also be seen as a kind of liberation from the constant monitoring of food choices that so many engage in. “In this society, there’s so much pressure for women to be thin. We’re not supposed to have appetites—and not just for food, but for a lot of things. We’re the givers and not the consumers, and I think some of my recent paintings are about the women staring at the viewers and saying, ‘I’m not going to censor my appetite,’” says Price.

Read the full article and see additional paintings here: Eat. Drink. One Woman:

Check out Lee Price’s website here: leepricestudio.com

 

 

Blue Dive

matt-story-swimming-blue-art

Matt Story studied art from an early age and demonstrated a unique skill for hyper-realism.  “I was lauded for ‘photo-realistic’ technique, but I was never after that, really, after what a camera impartially sees, because there’s so much more there, captured only by the human filter of memory.  We all posses these invisible imprints, through experience and living, but often its only artists who can play it back for us, to remind us.  The paint surface needs to be a mirror for the viewer, reflecting back not his or her superficial self, but a deep shared humanness.  This is the essence of looking at a piece that’s totally unfamiliar to you and yet, being awed with a sense of recognition.  Your reactions, those memories and feelings are uniquely yours but you’re suddenly filled with a sense that, you share them, at least with the artist, but probably even with everyone else.  That of course is art at its best: the artist, sometimes doesn’t even know what he’s doing because he’s a conduit of his or her own collective awareness.” (Find Story’s full bio here: MattStory.com)

 

 

Omar Ortiz

painting,realism, france

“Omar Ortiz, 37, was born and lives in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Since he was a boy he has been interested in drawing and illustration. He studied for a degree in Graphic Design, where he learned different techniques such as hand drawing, pastels, charcoal, water colors, acrylics and airbrushing. He currently works with oil painting because he considers it the noblest technique.

His work is characterized as minimalistic – hyperrealism where the human body is predominate  whit texture-filled backgrounds and a magical use of fabric. “His paintings act like intimate pieces, trapped in themselves, outside of space and context.”

This painting is titled “vive la France.”  Don’t miss: Contemplation, Flaming June, The Birth of Venus

Check out his Wordpress blog @ Omar Ortiz. His official website is here.


Thank you Sensual Starfish.


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