A Really Big Lunch

Jim was hungry, thirsty, joyously friendly, and characteristically overeager for the first course to come out of the kitchen. Jim’s appetite was legendary, and nothing makes a cook quite so happy as someone who exists entirely to eat—and when not eating, to talk about eating, to hunt and fish for things to eat, or to spend time after eating talking about what we just ate. […]

Jim and I shared many qualities: an unending appetite, inhaling life to the full chorizo, finding hilarious and playful nuance in every breath and every moment, but I always was and remain the student. Jim was sharper, more in tune with the distant cry of the loon over the lake while fishing on a lazy Tuesday morning, more sensitive to the moonlight over Washington Square Park on a dusk walk toward the Babbo apartment, where he sometimes stayed. Jim lived art not as a method to distill his thoughts but as a categorical way of understanding life, a quest to quench an insatiable thirst for all it put before him. And to share that understanding with any and every person he met. […]

Jim once wrote of a character, “He’s literally taking bites out of the sun, moon, and earth,” which is what he himself spent a lifetime doing. Damn, he was my hero.

~ Mario Batali, from “Inhaling Life” (The New Yorker, March 18, 2017). This text was drawn from the introduction to “A Really Big Lunch: Meditations on Food and Life from the Roving Gourmand,” by Jim Harrison, which is out on March 24th.

Splitting an Order

cutting-sandwich

I like to watch an old man cutting a sandwich in half,
maybe an ordinary cold roast beef on whole wheat bread,
no pickles or onion, keeping his shaky hands steady
by placing his forearms firm on the edge of the table
and using both hands, the left to hold the sandwich in place,
and the right to cut it surely, corner to corner,
observing his progress through glasses that moments before
he wiped with his napkin, and then to see him lift half
onto the extra plate that he asked the server to bring,
and then to wait, offering the plate to his wife
while she slowly unrolls her napkin and places her spoon,
her knife, and her fork in their proper places,
then smooths the starched white napkin over her knees
and meets his eyes and holds out both old hands to him.

~ Ted Kooser, Splitting an Order


Image: Dreamstime

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel-wednesday-hump-day-funny


Our morning ritual. My buddy reads me my Fan mail before we shower and take a long walk in the desert.


Notes: Source: themetapicture.com. Background on Caleb and the Wednesday Hump Day Posts: Let’s Hit it Again.

Guess.What.Day.It.Is. (I bet you didn’t know…)


I bet you didn’t know…that Caleb is ticklish!


The Feast Goes On

thanksgiving, recipe,food,eat,hungry

BBQ Turkey Sandwich.
DK & RK Certified as deliciousness.
Made to instructions without deviation.
Recipe below.


[Read more…]

Sunday Morning: The Pedrini Family

A Pasta Story from The Perennial Plate on Vimeo. Funding provided by intrepidtravel.com/italy


A clip that takes us to the hills in Tuscany with the Pedrini Family.

Good Sunday Morning.


Related Post: Sunday Morning: 10 Things We Love About Italy

Sunday Morning: 10 Things We Love About Italy

10 Things We Love About Italy from The Perennial Plate on Vimeo. Funding provided by intrepidtravel.com/italy.


I don’t know why I’m posting clips about food at 6am. Not helpful for my Biggest Loser Challenge. But this, THIS, was amazing. Enjoy.

Good Sunday Morning.


Love ya. All Seasons. All Forms. All meals.

fruit, watermelon, salad, drink


Image Credit

Saturday Afternoons are for…

and piping hot tomato soup… 🙂


Source: Thank you madamescherzo

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