You can’t love something if you don’t know it exists

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You will say you don’t have 10 minutes to watch.  And then, you will say, why did it end so soon.

Watch this amazing TED Talk here: Dive into an ocean photographer’s world.

“Somersaulting manta rays, dashing dolphins, swarming schools of fish and munching sharks inhabit a world beneath the ocean’s surface that few get a chance to see. Conservation photographer Thomas Peschak visits incredible seascapes around the world, and his photos reveal these hidden ecosystems. “You can’t love something and become a champion for it if you don’t know it exists,” he says. Join Peschak as he shares his stunning work and his dream for a future of respectful coexistence with the ocean.”

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: At Attention!

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Say Cheese!

Boys dressed up in school uniforms pose with king penguins at the London Zoo, 1953.

Don’t miss other “found” photos from National Geographic archives – some never published before at: Natgeofound


Source: My Modern Met

Let’s just say: Wow!

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Don’t miss all of the 2015 Winners: National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.

This photo, Whale Whisperers, was taken by Anuar Patjane, who was diving with a humpback whale and her newborn calf at Roca Partida in the Revillagigedo [Islands], Mexico.  Be sure to check out his other whale shots here: Anuar Patjane.


Thank you Eric.

Sunday Morning

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Every year, humpback whales come to Kingdom of Tonga during July to September. The mothers raise their babies and when they are enough strong they go far away to the cold water. During whale watching activity, you can live some incredible experiences by interaction with this fabulous mammal. This young calf played with me during 30 minutes under the control of his mother, a great memory. Photo by Marc Henauer.”

Don’t miss the other 9 pictures in The Telegraph: In pictures: The 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

Never too Heavy — to float above it all.

The photo is taken near Andaman islands while diving with a unique elephant, who likes to swim in the sea. It is one of the brightest experiences I've ever had.

“The photo is taken near Andaman islands while diving with a unique elephant, who likes to swim in the sea. It is one of the brightest experiences I’ve ever had.” ((Mike Korostelev)

Don’t miss other fantastic photos: The year’s most breathtaking travel destinations, from National Geographic’s 2015 Traveler Photo Contest


Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

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My Lady giving me some lovin’…here’s some Hump Day Inspiration.


Notes:

Is it not by his high superfluousness we know Our God?

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Too often we start with seeing what is wrong with this world.
We wallow in ‘what’s wrong.’
We need to instead ‘celebrate what’s right with the world.’
And adopt this as our perspective. Our frame of focus.

The lights dimmed after his introductory remarks. Dewitt Jones is one of America’s top freelance photographers. He has worked for the National Geographic magazine for 20 years. He is the author of nine books on nature and leadership. And he’s an inspirational speaker.

Hundreds of us sat, hushed, in the dark, awaiting light to be beamed from three large projection screens. He then flashed up a photograph.

See this untamed field of green, dotted by bright yellow dandelions.
This is the Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia.

I was dialed in. Selkirk Mountains. My mountains. My British Columbia. My Canada. What were the odds that he would have picked this shot and this story? [Read more…]

Sunday Morning: Taking an ordinary moment and elevating it to the iconic

“Joel Sartore is a photographer for the National Geographic. He will take 30,000 photos in a year to come up with three or four keeper photos.  Sartore has also been working on a 20-year protect called The Photo Ark, taking studio-style photos of animals to document biodiversity and call attention to endangered species. ‘The goal is for people to look these species in the eye and get them to care while there’s still time,’ said Sartore, described as a modern-day Noah.  He has photographed more than 2,650 species  and he believes ‘for many of Earth’s creatures, time is running out.  Half of the world’s plant and animal species will soon be threatened with extinction.’  Sartore believes he’ll have 5,000 to 6,000 photos of animals in The Photo Ark by the time he’s finished.”  Inspirational “Charles Kuralt” Sunday Morning-like clip.

Good Sunday Morning.

Joel Sartore, A photographer’s life from Joel Sartore on Vimeo.


Source: GrindTV

Shake Shake Shake

Grand Prize Winner, Busaba, Idochonise Tigress, Thailand


Out of 22,000 entries, this was National Geographics’ 2012 Grand-Prize Photo Contest Winner: The Explosion! The subject’s name is Busaba, a well cared for Indochinese Tigress whose home is at Khao Kheow Open Zoo, Thailand. 


Source: The Atlantic.  Thank you Cully for sharing.

Sunday Morning: Sarah, The World’s Fastest Runner


“Sarah, the Cheetah from the Cincinatti Zoo, shattered the world record for the standing 100-meter dash, clocking a time of 5.95 seconds—making Olympian Usain Bolt’s world record of 9.58 seconds look positively stodgy by comparison.  The ‘Polka-dotted missile’ rocketed to 61 miles an hour.”  Beyond Sarah’s raw speed, was the beauty and grace of this incredible animal.  Enjoy…

Good Sunday Morning.


Source: NatGeo

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