Tuesday Morning Wake-Up Call

It’s no good telling yourself that one day you will wish you had never made that change. It is no good anticipating regrets. Every tomorrow ought not to resemble every yesterday.

Beryl Markham, West with the Night (first published in 1942)


I called B.S. when I read this testimonial by Ernest Hemingway. And then I read it. Wow. What a writer.  If you have an Audible membership, this book is free with the membership.  In the must read category.

…she has written so well, and marvellously well, that I was completely ashamed of myself as a writer…she can write rings around all of us…I wish you would get it and read it because it is really a bloody wonderful book.” — Ernest Hemingway, in a letter to Maxwell Perkins”

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

T.G.I.F.: What?


Source: Fabulously Weird: A Jacana carrying chicks underneath its wings. Photo by Charl Stols Photography. Jacana Prime Time…With the floods arriving on the Chobe River fields of waterlilies and other water plants are forming, the nesting grounds for the African Jacana. Some of the males are still incubating the eggs while others have their hands or feathers full with looking after the chicks. In this image a male is carrying all four chicks under his wings just leaving their long legs and toes exposed. (Image taken on the Chobe River, Kasane, Botswana)

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

  • Photo: afar.com – Kenya’s Diani Beach (Thank you Christie for sharing)
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

 

Beautiful image, triggering incredible highs and bottomless darkness.

Orphaned Apollo loves to run alongside his Keepers on their daily walkabouts but when he’s not galloping about, he loves a belly rub which never fails to lull him into a blissful stupor. Find out more about his daily routine: Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.  And don’t miss this video.

T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week


Source: Hippo Photographed by Dale Morris (via Newthom)

Saturday Morning

I can watch elephants (and elephants alone) for hours at a time, for sooner or later the elephant will do something very strange such as mow grass with its toenails or draw the tusks from the rotted carcass of another elephant and carry them off into the bush. There is mystery behind that masked gray visage, and ancient life force, delicate and mighty, awesome and enchanted, commanding the silence ordinarily reserved for mountain peaks, great fires, and the sea.

Peter Matthiessen,  The Tree Where Man Was Born


Photo: Lukas Holas. Quote: via Schonwieder

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week


Source Cheetah Camp

Bath Time!

Orphaned baby elephants take a mud bath at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. The elephant orphanage looks after 29 baby elephants orphaned by human-wildlife conflicts and poaching, among other causes. (Dai Kurokawa, wsj.com, April 10, 2018)


Sunday Morning Sunrise

After reading “this several days ago, I’ve been unable to shake it from consciousness. “This” is driving the underlying current of my blog post shares of African animals.  Even this herd of elephants who wake to the morning sun and march in Tsavo National Park, seem to be doing so solemnly.


Love and Safety (and a punch in the gut)

A worker at the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya shares a tender moment with an elephant calf. Your Shot photographer I. Ogila explains, “When poachers kill adult elephants for ivory, the young ones are usually left desperate and unlikely to survive alone in the wild.” But by being in the care of the Trust, “they get a chance to live and die of old age.”

Source: NationalGeographic.com. Photograph by I. Ogila, National Geographic Your Shot

 

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel-hump-day-christmas-wednesday


Notes:

T.G.I.F.: Like a punch in the gut 


National Geographic curated photos from 91 photographers, 107 stories, and 2,290,225 photographs.  

Poachers killed this black rhinoceros for its horn with high-caliber bullets in South Africa’s Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park. Black rhinos number only about 5,000 today.

Don’t miss the 51 other amazing photos here: 2016 Photos of the Year.

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel-hump-day-wednesday


Notes:

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel


Notes:

T.G.I.F.: 5:00 PM Bell!

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Notes:

Saturday Morning

elephant

In one of his insightful talks Zen master Shunryu Suzuki said that in your practice you should walk like an elephant. “If you can walk slowly, without any idea of gain, then you are already a good Zen student.” There’s a mantra for your religion: Walk like an elephant. It means to move at a comfortable pace. No rushing toward a goal. No push to make it all meaningful. The sometimes inscrutable texts of Taoism and Zen teach that it’s important to do what you do without trying to accomplish anything. One of the benefits of a religion of one’s own is its ordinariness and simplicity. You don’t need a magnificent ceremony, a specially ordained minister, or a revered revelation to give you authority. You don’t have to get anywhere. There are no goals and objectives: nothing to succeed in, and nothing in which to fail. You can sit in your house, as Thoreau did, and be attentive— his suggestion. “We are surrounded by a rich and fertile mystery. May we not probe it, pry into it, employ ourselves about it— a little? . . . If by watching all day and all night I may detect some trace of the Ineffable, then will it not be worth the while to watch?”

~ Thomas Moore, A Religion of One’s Own: A Guide to Creating a Personal Spirituality in a Secular World.


Notes:

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel-wednesday-hump-day-ocean


Notes:

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Let’s Go.

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Source:

I don’t do sterile, formal pictures

Hans Feurer is considered one of the leading figures in fashion photography. His genre-defining career spans fifty years.  Since the early 1960’s, this man with a passion for Africa and travel pursues the idea of fashion photography as the tracking of a wild animal. Clothes and skin are light as the feathers of a bird with impressive panache. It was in Africa that Feurer discovered his exceptional sensibility for light and his love for the natural wonders of the continent. Strong influences of his travels are evident in the inherent sense of adventure Feurer’s images convey, as well as the raw, expressive quality of his photographs.

Feurer’s female figure is strong and ferocious, sensual and uninhibited, moving effortlessly, her expressions reflecting intensity and vigour. Crucial to Feurer’s work is to capture a very particular moment where an emotion reveals itself in the movement of the model and the scene truly comes to life. ‘I don’t do sterile, formal pictures’, Feurer describes his process of capturing that elusive moment. ‘I like to make pictures that provoke an emotion and affect you in your feelings. For that, both the woman and the clothes need to come alive.'”

Find Feurer’s website here: hansfeurer.com

BodyPaint painted by Kodak Switzerland, 1987; photograph by Hans Feurer; Model Gitta Sack.


Source: This Isn’t Happiness

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