Love and Safety (and a punch in the gut)

A worker at the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya shares a tender moment with an elephant calf. Your Shot photographer I. Ogila explains, “When poachers kill adult elephants for ivory, the young ones are usually left desperate and unlikely to survive alone in the wild.” But by being in the care of the Trust, “they get a chance to live and die of old age.”

Source: NationalGeographic.com. Photograph by I. Ogila, National Geographic Your Shot

 

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

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Notes:

T.G.I.F.: Like a punch in the gut 


National Geographic curated photos from 91 photographers, 107 stories, and 2,290,225 photographs.  

Poachers killed this black rhinoceros for its horn with high-caliber bullets in South Africa’s Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park. Black rhinos number only about 5,000 today.

Don’t miss the 51 other amazing photos here: 2016 Photos of the Year.

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel-hump-day-wednesday


Notes:

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

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Notes:

T.G.I.F.: 5:00 PM Bell!

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Saturday Morning

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In one of his insightful talks Zen master Shunryu Suzuki said that in your practice you should walk like an elephant. “If you can walk slowly, without any idea of gain, then you are already a good Zen student.” There’s a mantra for your religion: Walk like an elephant. It means to move at a comfortable pace. No rushing toward a goal. No push to make it all meaningful. The sometimes inscrutable texts of Taoism and Zen teach that it’s important to do what you do without trying to accomplish anything. One of the benefits of a religion of one’s own is its ordinariness and simplicity. You don’t need a magnificent ceremony, a specially ordained minister, or a revered revelation to give you authority. You don’t have to get anywhere. There are no goals and objectives: nothing to succeed in, and nothing in which to fail. You can sit in your house, as Thoreau did, and be attentive— his suggestion. “We are surrounded by a rich and fertile mystery. May we not probe it, pry into it, employ ourselves about it— a little? . . . If by watching all day and all night I may detect some trace of the Ineffable, then will it not be worth the while to watch?”

~ Thomas Moore, A Religion of One’s Own: A Guide to Creating a Personal Spirituality in a Secular World.


Notes:

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

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Notes:

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Let’s Go.

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Source:

I don’t do sterile, formal pictures

Hans Feurer is considered one of the leading figures in fashion photography. His genre-defining career spans fifty years.  Since the early 1960’s, this man with a passion for Africa and travel pursues the idea of fashion photography as the tracking of a wild animal. Clothes and skin are light as the feathers of a bird with impressive panache. It was in Africa that Feurer discovered his exceptional sensibility for light and his love for the natural wonders of the continent. Strong influences of his travels are evident in the inherent sense of adventure Feurer’s images convey, as well as the raw, expressive quality of his photographs.

Feurer’s female figure is strong and ferocious, sensual and uninhibited, moving effortlessly, her expressions reflecting intensity and vigour. Crucial to Feurer’s work is to capture a very particular moment where an emotion reveals itself in the movement of the model and the scene truly comes to life. ‘I don’t do sterile, formal pictures’, Feurer describes his process of capturing that elusive moment. ‘I like to make pictures that provoke an emotion and affect you in your feelings. For that, both the woman and the clothes need to come alive.'”

Find Feurer’s website here: hansfeurer.com

BodyPaint painted by Kodak Switzerland, 1987; photograph by Hans Feurer; Model Gitta Sack.


Source: This Isn’t Happiness

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