Peace

Thank you Sawsan for sharing. Moved.

Berg!

An iceberg ran aground over Easter weekend just off the small Newfoundland town of Ferryland, population 465, drawing knots of tourists eager to catch a glimpse.  Some are locals or travelers who happened to be nearby, but many are a special Canadian breed, the iceberg chaser — People who flock to the coasts of Labrador and Newfoundland at this time of year hoping to see the huge frozen chunks of broken glacier that drift by on a stretch of sea known as Iceberg Alley.

The berg at Ferryland rises about 15 stories above the waterline — and that is only about 10 percent of its mass. Some of the submerged ice comes into view when the berg is seen from above…

The stunning view that is causing traffic jams of onlookers on the coast road is actually a snapshot of the iceberg’s death throes, 15,000 years in the making. What began as snowflakes falling on Greenland during the last ice age has crept to the sea in a glacier and then broken off, probably sometime in the last three years, to float slowly out into Baffin Bay. Bumped and nudged by one another and by melting pack ice, the bergs eventually get caught up in the southbound Labrador Current and sail down Iceberg Alley.

~ Dan Levin, excerpts from a story in the NY Times, April 20, 2017

Don’t miss the full story and other fantastic photographs by Jody Martin here: A Chunk of the Arctic Stops By for a Photo Shoot

Ethereal Blue

steve-mandel-antarctic-blue-glacier

steve-mandel-antarctic-glacier-blue

“Photographer Steve Mandel recently ventured to Antarctica where he captured breathtaking images of glaciers. His frosty shots are a unique twist on landscape photography—instead of presenting one view of the icebergs, the California-based creative shot a split view in a single frame. Half of the picture shows the glacier above water, while the other part illustrates what lies beneath.

‘This was my first [time] shooting above and below shots,’ Mandel tells us in an email. ‘I was inspired by some images I had seen taken by a National Geographic photographer.’ He’s fascinated by the form, color, and physics of icebergs, and explains what makes them so special. ‘The top of the glacier is white because it is new snow, that over time, compresses. The beautiful blue color in the ice is older ice in which the air has been partially compressed out.’ This delicate balance produces images that often have an otherworldly feel to them, and with this series, Mandel has captured moments frozen in time.”

Don’t miss other Mandel’s other photos in the series at his website: Antarctic Ice

Don’t miss the interview with Steve Mandel: My Modern Met


Source: My Modern Met

Sunday Morning: Return of the Sun

This short ~3 minute clip is a portrait of a modern Inuit family set in North Greenland.  Beautiful cinematography, music and script.  Good Sunday morning…

Return of the Sun from Glen Milner on Vimeo.


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