A ‘Good Morning’ you can actually feel vibrating in your chest

My favorite sound is the gentle rumble of an elephant greeting. It’s a very low “brrrmmmbrrrmmm.” A large component of that rumble is infrasonic — below the range of human hearing. It carries quite far. And if an elephant is close to you, you can actually feel it vibrating in your chest. It’s just the most relaxing, gentle and friendly sound.

Cynthia Moss, a wildlife researcher and conservationist who has spent more than 40 years living with and observing elephants in Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Botswana.


Notes:

  • Source: NY Times: Cynthia Moss
  • Note to Self: Some day, if we’re not careful, this sound and this incredible creature will be gone. And what a monumental loss to this planet it will be.

Never too Heavy — to float above it all.

The photo is taken near Andaman islands while diving with a unique elephant, who likes to swim in the sea. It is one of the brightest experiences I've ever had.

“The photo is taken near Andaman islands while diving with a unique elephant, who likes to swim in the sea. It is one of the brightest experiences I’ve ever had.” ((Mike Korostelev)

Don’t miss other fantastic photos: The year’s most breathtaking travel destinations, from National Geographic’s 2015 Traveler Photo Contest


Think Big. Stand Tall. Fear Not.

elephant-think-big


Source: Bizarbazar

Dance of Birth

David Strege @ Grindtv.com with First steps of baby elephant is touching scene:

Amy Attenborough of the Londolozi Game Reserve wrote that great ceremony accompanies the first steps a baby elephant makes, as the herd closes in to give support to the baby and the mother, after her 22-month pregnancy.

“We watched the elephants perform the dance of birth where they pirouetted in tight circles around themselves and waltzed around each other to the music of their rumbling,” Attenborough wrote.

The three elephants surrounding the baby helped it get up and steadied it on its feet. Attenborough said she was stressed, worrying the elephants might trample the baby elephant, though it appears the elephants were merely helping it stay upright until it found the strength to walk on its own.

“They also touched their trunks to it tenderly, taking turns to greet the new member of the family, all the while rumbling in the deeply comforting way that speaks to elephants and humans alike.”

It was, as Attenborough stated, an “incredibly touching scene.”


 

T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week


An excited baby elephant has fun clumsily climbing in and out of a big tub at the Elephantstay, an elephant sanctuary in Ayutthaya, Thailand.


T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

funny-gif-baby-elephant-group-egrets


Source: themetapicture

T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week

ostrich, funny,laugh


Source: Awesomegifs

 

Saturday Morning Work-Out Inspiration

cartoon-funny-elephant-jump-exercise


Source: indypendent-thinking

 

We are finite, separate and neurotic. We strive and go crazy to become more important.

cute-girl-baby-elephant-hugging

“We tend to think animals are lower than us, but all the scientists in the world couldn’t design and operate a bumblebee’s wing. We can’t jump or run very fast, and we can’t carry vast weights like an ant can. We can’t see in the dark and we can’t fly except crammed in a noisy tube like sardines, which doesn’t count. Humans compared to animals are almost totally deaf, and we can’t smell a fart in an elevator by their standards. We are finite and separate, and neurotic, while the consciousness of an animal is at peace and eternal. We strive and go crazy to become more important. Animals rest and sleep and enjoy the company of each other. We think we have evolved upwards from animals but we have lost almost all of their qualities and abilities. The idea that animals don’t have consciousness or that they don’t have a soul is rather crass. It shows a lack of consciousness. They talk, they have families, they feel things, they act individually or together to solve problems, they often care of their young as a tribal unit. They play, they travel, and medicate themselves when they get sick. They cry when others in the herd die, they know about us humans. Of course they have a soul, a very pristine one. We humans are only now attempting with the recent rise in consciousness to achieve the soul that animals have naturally.”

– Stuart Wilde


Credits: Photograph – Themetapicture.  Poem/Quote: Sensual Starfish


Shiver

gregory-colbert-elephant
One week ago.
I read the title of this article in GQ.
Paused.
Then read the sub-title.
And stepped away.
I couldn’t bear to read anymore. (I couldn’t read more than the title and the subtitle.)
And I haven’t be able to scrape the words or images out of my mind since then.

Here it is: Elephants


Photography: Gregory Colbert

 

I, Elephant


Do you know what is like to be like an elephant? walk like an elephant? eat like an elephant?


SMWI*: Just keep going

funny-gif-little-elephant-walking-falling


  • SMWI* = Saturday Morning Work-out Inspiration
  • Credits: Thank you Susan

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

funny-gif-elephant-breaking-race


Image Credit

Touched

elephants-unite-gif

“Shirley and Jenny, two former circus elephants who hadn’t seen each other in 22 years were reunited at The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee.  They recognized each other immediately, and their deep attachment is captured in this video of the reunion.  The PBS show Nature published an update on Shirley and Jenny’s lives.” While this story is a bit stale, I was moved by the photograph, the video and the PBS update.


Credits: Background: Predator Haven.  Image: Themetapicture.com

I am King

photography

A road,
a mile of kingdom.
I am king
Of banks and stones
and every blooming thing.

— Patrick Kavanagh, “Inniskeen Road”


Patrick Kavanagh (1904–1967) was an Irish poet and novelist. Regarded as one of the foremost poets of the 20th century. He is known for accounts of Irish life through reference to the everyday and commonplace. Kavanagh was born in rural Inniskeen in 1904, the fourth of ten children born to Bridget Quinn. His father, James, was a shoemaker and farmer. Kavanagh was a pupil at Kednaminsha National School from 1909 to 1916, leaving in the sixth year, at the age of 13. He became apprenticed to his father as a shoemaker and worked on his farm. For the first 27 years of his life, he lived and worked as a farmer of a small holding. He later reflected, “Although the literal idea of the peasant is of a farm labouring person, in fact a peasant is all that mass of mankind which lives below a certain level of consciousness. They live in the dark cave of the unconscious and they scream when they see the light.” He commented that though he grew up in a poor district “the real poverty was lack of enlightenment [and] I am afraid this fog of unknowing affected me dreadfully.” (Source: Wiki)

Insight: “inniskeen Road” marks a significant achievement because of its reflective quality…The closing couplet sees him master of his newly burst road, if uncertain how to proceed along it…Similar oscillations between potency and anxiety mark the decade between the publication of this collection and Kavanaugh’s next trade collection, A Soul for Sale (1947). (Source:The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Poetry (edited by Fran Brearton, Alan Gillis), pp.184-185 via books.google.com))


Quote Source: Larmoyante; Image Source: Hungarian Soul.

Pachyderm & Her Pal. 9000 pounds of inspiration.


“Bubbles, 32, was adopted as a ivory orphan by the Myrtle Beach Safari in 1983. As Bubbles grew over the years, from 300 pounds to 9000 pounds, so too did her love of swimming.  In 2007, a contractor hired to build Bubbles a swimming pool, abandoned Bella as a puppy at The Preserve.  The river presented these two the opportunity to interact in a way that developed a deep and lasting friendship. Today, they are inseparable.

Bubbles’ family was killed in 1981 by ivory poachers.  She was one of the fortunate few that survived the slaughter.  Today, tens of thousands of elephants are still be illegally poached for their ivory.”


Thank you Janet.


 

3:48 am. And Inspired.

Buddha, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand


Good Wednesday morning. Here are my selections of the inspiring posts of the week:

kingdomany’s photostream with his shot (above) of Buddha in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

Steve Layman @ with his share: More from the good old days………….:Here’s words you don’t hear anymore:…Wash your feet before you go to bed, you’ve been playing outside all day barefooted…Why can’t you remember to roll up your britches legs? Getting them caught in the bicycle chain so many times is tearing them up….Don’t you go outside with your school clothes on!…Be sure and pour the cream off the top of the milk when you open the new bottle…Open the back door and see if we can get a breeze through here, it is getting hot”…Read more @ this link. 

Brenda Knowles @ Space2Live with her video post titled: The Space We Need. “Something new for space2live… a short film (5 minutes, it’s worth it).  A visual to enhance the many words spilled on the pages of this site. Through filmmaker, Nic Askew’s, beautiful lens the experience, rather than the explanation, of an introvert is captured and shared in a soul biography. You’ll feel the honesty and vulnerability.  Enjoy.” Watch film at this link. [Read more…]

Sunday Morning: Happy

Young baby elephant goes for a swim. I haven’t seen anything like it. One happy creature…

Good Sunday Morning.


Source: Thank you Eric.

3:40 am and Inspired…

We’re opening Hump day with a clip about two good friends…an Elephant (Tara) and a Dog (Bella).  We usually lead with a music video…not today.  This was shared with me by a follower (Thanks SR) and it has stuck with me all week.  And then on to the top posts of the week from my favorite bloggers…



Susan Kelley @ Great Moments with her post: “Keep Calm and Carry On.” It doesn’t take any more chaos than a bad day to show our propensity to focus on the negative and miss the joy in each day. (And yes, I resemble this remark.) Think of what we tell people about a bad day. We recount in detail the incompetence, laziness, selfishness and general cluelessness that diminished our brilliance. But seldom do we recall the smile and hug from a loved one, the extra mile effort of a co-worker, encouragement from a friend, and the contributions of strangers that make our productivity possible. And, the fact that we’re here to describe our day in lurid detail. We forget about that, too…”

[Read more…]

EOW Wrap…Friday Five.

elephant in water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Feeling like the big guy here after the end of a long week.  Here’s my Friday Five Recap for the week:

[Read more…]

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