Fleetwood Mac and “Dreams” – A thing of beauty is a joy forever

It has been 40 years (40 years!) since the release of Fleetwood Mac’s masterpiece 1977 album, “Rumours.”  This is a deconstruction of the hit song “Dreams” from the album.  I think it is safe to say that 40 years from now, we’ll still be listening to Fleetwood Mac.  And as John Keats wrote, “a thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

I’m pretty sure that this was going to be up there with one of the best nights of my life

Harry Styles likes to bring out surprise guests during his shows—and when he performed a secret show at Los Angeles’ Troubadour on Friday night (May 19, 2017), concert attendees were especially starstruck when he brought out none other than Fleetwood Mac singer and good witch Stevie Nicks. The two performed duets on both Styles’s single “Two Ghosts” and Fleetwood Mac’s ballad “Landslide.” Styles began by playing a few songs from his new album at the event before introducing his special guest. “I’m pretty sure that this was going to be up there with one of the best nights of my life,” he said, according to Billboard. “If there was any doubt, I’m pretty sure I’d like to confirm, in my entire life, I never thought I’d be able to say this. Please welcome to the stage, Stevie Nicks.” The two sang one more song together—Nicks and Don Henley’s “Leather and Lace”—before Nicks left the stage.


Source: Vanity Fair

Who’s Better? Nobody.

Tusk. Bathe in the radiant black light of ’70s.

Letter of Recommendation: Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Tusk”:

There is a species of spider that hunts by releasing chemicals that imitate the sex pheromones of moths. When its prey arrives, high on fantasies of romance, the spider hits it with a sticky blob of web, then devours it. Scientists call this “aggressive mimicry.”

This is something like the operating principle behind Fleetwood Mac’s 1979 album “Tusk.” The trap is set with the first track: a lite-rock masterpiece, in roughly the tempo of a summer nap, called “Over & Over.” The singer’s voice is smooth and sad, a melon-flavored wine cooler on a vacant beach at sunset with the one you know will eventually leave you. The keening cheese-ball lyrics (“all you have to do is speak out my name, and I will come running”) are so generic as to be almost meaningless, and these words float on top of a clean acoustic strum, which is punctuated neatly by a clean snare, which is colored in turn by the very clean jangles of an undistorted electric guitar.

It is, in other words, quintessential Fleetwood Mac: classic FM-radio easy listening — an absolute top-shelf lighter-swaying anthem. Not a note is out of place. (This may be the spot to mention that the birth name of the song’s lead vocalist, Christine McVie, is actually Christine Perfect.) The band’s three-voiced choir is in full-on angel-harmony mode — “Oooooooooooo a-ooo-ooo-OOO-ooo-oooooooooooo” — and as the refrain drones on (“over and over, over and over, over and over”) you can feel your pulse beginning to slow, and you step through the bead curtains into the dim back room of your consciousness, where the lava lamp still blorbles and the ylang-ylang incense burns and you can bathe forever in the radiant black light of the perpetual 1970s.

Don’t miss entire article by Sam Anderson here: Letter of Recommendation: Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Tusk”:


Landslide

cloud in a blue sky

It was move-in day.
A North Carolina morning.
Where a cool breeze dusted your face.
And a cumulus cloud was chiseled into an otherwise unmarked sky.
The Sun was warming.
Yes, another one of those days in which you know.
You know that this wasn’t all by accident.
Too large. Too complex. Just too big.

We are among other parents and their children getting an early start.
Moving day buzz and jitters.
Hauling printers, pillows, college-ruled paper and milk crates. Setting up bunk beds.

He’s tense.
Momma and Momma’s Boy are tangling over where to put stuff.
PC isn’t working.
I tell him to let me try.
I sit in his desk chair. The chair he will be sitting in for the next 9 months.
And work on setting up his printer.
I feel his disorientation.
The Anxiety.
Change.
He’s inherited this from his Dad.   [Read more…]

Saturday Afternoon with Ari Hest…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Easing out of a lazy Saturday afternoon, here’s Ari Hest and a smooth rendition of an old Fleetwood Mac favorite: Tell Me Lies.

↓ click for audio (Tell Me Lies – Ari Hest)


Image: Madame Scherzo via weheartit.com

Related Posts:

Hump Day: 4:12 am and inspired…

Kickin’ off Hump Day with Fleetwood Mac and “The Chain” and several of my favorite posts of the week…


 


Kurt Harden @ Cultural Offering with his post “In Praise of Life.”

Here is the thing about life:  From the moment you are ejected out of your mother’s womb, it is coming for you.  Life is unrelenting.  It is experiential.  Smells, sounds, sights and senses constantly bombarding you.  A fire hose dousing you every single moment of every single day.  At some point we get to decide: Are we going to manage life or are we going to be managed by it. Is this the most basic decision we make? …If I think to the most important decision I have ever made it has been this one: Swim versus tread water. One decision demands thought and action, another buoyancy.

Sarah Potter @ sarahpotterwrites:

“Plenty of things are conspiring to stop me, but I refuse to submit.”

[Read more…]

Here Comes the Sun…

Thank you Rob Firchau @ the Hammock Papers for sharing another great post.  This one…Lindsey Buckingham’s rendition of the Beatles’ classic: “Here Comes The Sun.”  Amazing guitar and vocals.  You can hear, see and feel Fleetwood Mac coursing throughout…

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