Truth


Source: No Context The Good Place (Ted Danson as “Michael” in The Good Place)

Critics’ Consensus: “Engrossing and affecting”

8-part miniseries.

I started and didn’t stop until it was over.

Yes, that good.  

Find it on Netflix or Discovery Channel.

Rotten Tomatoes Review: 95%. Critics Consensus: Engrossing and affecting.

Who can take a nothing day, and suddenly make it all seem worthwhile?

mary-tyler-moore

Who can take a nothing day, and suddenly make it all seem worthwhile?

Mary Tyler Moore
Dec. 29, 1936 – Jan. 25, 2017

 


Notes:

Charles Osgood

charles-osgood

LC: …You are now widely considered among one of the legends, certainly were to me growing up.

Charles: That has its advantages and disadvantages. There’s no joy in winding this up. But there has been a lot of joy in it. There has been a lot of happy memories associated with it.  And they all have to do with the people you work with. And also has to do with the people who are watching, because you really feel it’s all for them.

LC: Do you feel satisfied with this long career?

Charles: No. (laughing). Well, it’s just one of those things that if you enjoy something, you want to keep doing it, and you don’t want it to ever end, ever.  Most people find it hard to imagine that you regard this as work. It’s not really work, it is really a joy.

Charles Osgood, 83, retires from CBS Sunday Morning after 22 years.

And here’s Charles Osgood singing on his 80th birthday


Truth

anxiety-news-terrorist-fear-chart


Source: Indexed – Existential Heartburn

 

Binge Watching. No comment as to you Aussies and Kiwis.

serial-episodes

“Netflix knows the exact episode of a TV show that gets you hooked. A sample:

  • Bloodline — Episode 4
  • Breaking Bad — Episode 2
  • Grace & Frankie — Episode 4
  • House of Cards — Episode 3
  • Mad Men — Episode 6
  • Orange is the New Black — Episode 3
  • Sons of Anarchy — Episode 2
  • Suits — Episode 2
  • The Blacklist — Episode 6
  • The Walking Dead — Episode 2

The episode that Netflix names as the “hooked” episode is the global average, but it found some local variations. “The Dutch, for instance, tend to fall in love with series the fastest, getting hooked one episode ahead of most countries irrespective of the show.” On the other hand, “members in Australia and New Zealand [got] hooked one to two episodes later than the rest of the world on almost every show.”

See full article and list of TV Series at the Verve: Netflix knows the exact episode of a TV show that gets you hooked


Credits: Image – Exactly

A blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others

tatiana-maslany

By: Lili Loofbourow, The Many Faces of Tatiana Maslany:

Tatiana Maslany, the 29-year old actress, is a native of Regina, Saskatchewan. She is the leading lady on the set of “Orphan Black,” the BBC America television show that has the same star many times over. “Orphan Black,” you see, is about a group of persecuted clones, and all of them are played by Tatiana Maslany.

Despite Maslany’s reluctance, I managed to steer our conversation back to her magical quick-change act. I still wanted to know how she does it. “I think there’s something about being prepared enough that you can surrender,” she said. Then she quoted to me something the dancer Martha Graham told the choreographer Agnes de Mille in 1943.

At the time, de Mille was confused and bewildered by her sudden rise to fame, and Graham offered her words of encouragement.  […] De Mille asked Graham when she would feel satisfied, and Graham replied: “There is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer, divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.” I asked Maslany what her divine dissatisfaction was. “I don’t know how I would label it right now,” she said. “I think if I looked back on this time, I’d probably see where it lived.”

Don’t miss entire NY Times Magazine article here: The Many Faces of Tatiana Maslany.


Red’s Wish. My Wish Too.

To stand at the helm of your destiny. I want that, one more time. I want to be in the Piazza del Campo in Siena. To feel the surge as 10 racehorses go thundering by. I want another meal in Paris, at L’Ambroisie, at the Place des Vosges. I want another bottle of wine. And then another. I want the warmth of a woman and a cool set of sheets. One more night of jazz at the Vanguard. I want to stand on the summits and smoke Cubans and feel the sun on my face for as long as I can. Walk on the Wall again. Climb the Tower. Ride the River. Stare at the Frescos. I want to sit in the garden and read one more good book. Most of all I want to sleep. I want to sleep like I slept when I was a boy. Give me that, just one time…

— Raymond “Red” Reddington, The Blacklist


Source: Thank you Kurt @ Cultural Offering

Fantasy Island = Less Work (-100%) + More Sleep (+13%) + Way More Reading (+269%)

retiring-retirement-chart

Source: wsj.com

 

Saturday Morning

funny,laugh,sleep,saturday morning

funny,sleep,saturday morning


Source: wobblywibbly

Aging Americans Sleep More, Work Less (Note to Self: No way)

americans-time-activities-survey-chart

Excerpts from WSJ: Aging Americans Sleep More, Work Less, Survey Finds:

  • Americans older than 14: 14 minutes less work a day and 10 minutes more sleep than when the survey began a decade earlier.
  • Americans’ No. 1 hobby remains watching television. Respondents said they spent an average of two hours, 46 minutes a day watching TV, 11 minutes more than in 2003.
  • “The data defies popular expectations…People say they’re too busy for leisure and don’t have time to sleep, but that seems not to be the case.”
  • It is difficult to grasp precisely why people have shifted how they spend their days. But demographics and economics play a large role. The U.S. population is aging, with 8,000 people turning 65 each day. Many of those individuals are retired or working part time and thus have more time to sleep, watch television, play shuffleboard and other non-work activities.
  • “Essentially, the share of the population who works zero hours per day is growing faster than the employed”
  • Most other types of leisure, including reading, socializing in person and taking a second to think, have edged down since 2003. One exception: playing videogames and other “computer use for leisure,” which includes posting pictures on Facebook and mindlessly surfing the Web to kill time. On weekend days, men spend 38 minutes on this activity, 13 minutes more than in 2009.

Read full article here: Aging Americans Sleep More, Work Less, Survey Finds

 

Only Us – – Small, Solitary

House of Cards - Kevin Spacey

There’s no solace
above or below.
Only us —
small,
solitary,
striving,
battling one another.
I pray to myself,
for myself.

~ House of Cards, 1×12.


Source: facies-destruens


No one would sleep that night, of course

stars

“Ralph Waldo Emerson once asked what we would do if the stars only came out once every thousand years. No one would sleep that night, of course. The world would create new religions overnight. We would be ecstatic, delirious, made rapturous by the glory of God. Instead, the stars come out every night and we watch television.”

Paul Hawken


Credits: Photograph – NatGeo first place Best Travel Picture Winner in 2011. Ben Canales sprawls in the snow under the starry sky above Crater Lake National Park in Oregon. Quote: Thepoetoaster.com


Not exactly

social media, internet, graph,facebook,


Research saysFor every additional minute the average American spends online recreationally, they spend roughly 16 fewer seconds working, nine fewer seconds watching TV, and seven fewer seconds sleeping.

DK Scorecard:

  • Work (Wrong. Off. Zero.)
  • TV (Stretch Big).
  • Sleeping (Stretch Large).
  • Offline Socializing (What’s that?)
  • Relax and Thinking (Who’s got time? Stretch.)

See full article @ HBR Blog Network – The More Time We Spend Online, the Less Time We Spend Working


Amy & Travis


Amy & Travis dance to James Vincent McMorrow’s rendition of “Wicked Games” in “So You Think You Can Dance.”


Credits: Thank you Susan for sharing her favorite dance of the season.

Related Posts:


Tootsie = Epiphany


This emotional three minute interview with Dustin Hoffman has gone viral on Youtube.  Hoffman said he’d initially had doubts about making the movie Tootsie unless he could be made to look like a beautiful woman.  In the moment he was told that he was as attractive as he was going to get as a woman, the actor said he had an epiphany.

“I went home and started crying, talking to my wife, and I said, ‘I have to make this picture,’” Hoffman said, choking up as he recalled his reaction. “And she said, ‘Why?’ And I said, ‘Because I think I’m an interesting woman, when I look at myself on-screen, and I know that if I met myself at a party I would never talk to that character because she doesn’t fulfill, physically, the demands that we’re brought up to think women have to have in order for us to ask them out.’

“She says, ‘What are you saying?’ And I said, ‘There’s too many interesting women I have … not had the experience to know in this life because I have been brainwashed. And that was never a comedy for me,” he said.

Hoffman, 75, has been nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning two for his performances in Kramer vs. Kramer and Rain Main.  His other notable films include Midnight Cowboy, Little Big Man, Papillon, All The President’s Men, Tootsie, Hook and Wag the Dog.


Source: Thank you (again) Lori @ Donna & Diablo.  Moved.  Full stop.

Anthony Bourdain

black and white

ZIMMERN: …The other day I saw on Eater that someone was saying that they thought you were the next Julia Child.

BOURDAIN: It’s flattering but wrong‑headed. I mean, Julia Child changed the f***ing world. I am not a particle of dust compared to her. I am flattered to even be mentioned in postironic jest in the same paragraph. But to be actually compared? No. Absolutely not. She was such an important figure, a pioneer out there …

BOURDAIN: And I don’t care if my mom approves. … Look, if I’ve learned anything—I wrote Kitchen Confidential because I didn’t think anyone would read it. That was a liberating moment. You know, writing every morning before I went to work with absolute certainty that no one other than a few cooks would read it was a truly liberating place to write a book. That was a lesson I learned in the bone, meaning the instinct to think about what do they want—What do they expect? What do my biggest fans want me to do next? How will they receive it? Who’s watching? Who’s reading?—this is a lethal, lethal instinct. I have to not think that. We all want to be loved, but I’m not going to even ask what people want, because that will … [Read more…]

T.G.I.T.: Latka


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T.G.I.F.: Mary & Chuckles


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T.G.I.F.: Hyacinth


I just LOVE Hyacinth…

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