Sunday Morning

When I found the seal pup alone on the far beach,
not sleeping but looking all around, I didn’t
reason it out, for reason would have sent me away,
I just
went close but not too close, and lay down on the sand
with my back toward it, and
pretty soon it rolled over, and rolled over
until the length of its body lay along
the length of my body, and so we touched, and maybe
our breathing together was some kind of heavenly conversation
in God’s delicate and magnifying language, the one
we don’t dare speak out loud,
not yet.

~ Mary Oliver, from “The Return” in From What Do We Know: Poems And Prose Poems.


Notes: Poem via Words for the YearSeal pup photo by gemma reddington

Frans Lanting

“No photographer turns animals into art more completely than Frans Lanting,” writes The New Yorker. Lanting’s images have been featured in exhibitions at major museums and leading art galleries around the world.

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“Impalas alarmed, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania: I keep three cameras on the seat next to me, each mounted with a different lens, allowing me to frame a moment any way it unfolds–far or wide. For this image I grabbed a Nikkor 300mm f2.8 lens to crop in smoothly on a herd of impalas when one alarm call transformed a placid scattering of grazers into a scene of suspense. An ever-present sense of danger characterizes the African plains. This image visualizes fear by inferring it. The collective gaze of the impalas points at something invisible, hidden in plain view–in a moment that could not have been chased, only waited for.”

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“Macaws over river, Tambopata National Reserve, Peru: Perched on a scaffold a hundred feet above a clay lick where macaws gather, I had an eagle’s-eye view of their coming and goings as they flew over the muddy river below. From that perspective I could see how each species of macaw flashes a distinctive combination of colors and patterns visible only from above.”


Source: DON’T MISS checking out his Lanting’s other photographs here.

FRANS LANTING has been hailed as one of the great photographers of our time. His influential work appears in books, magazines, and exhibitions around the world. Born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, he earned a master’s degree in economics then moved to the United States to study environmental planning.  Soon after, he began photographing the natural world–and never turned back.  For three decades he has documented wildlife from the Amazon to Antarctica to promote understanding about the Earth and its natural history through images that convey a passion for nature and a sense of wonder about our living planet. See his full bio here.


Pachyderm & Her Pal. 9000 pounds of inspiration.


“Bubbles, 32, was adopted as a ivory orphan by the Myrtle Beach Safari in 1983. As Bubbles grew over the years, from 300 pounds to 9000 pounds, so too did her love of swimming.  In 2007, a contractor hired to build Bubbles a swimming pool, abandoned Bella as a puppy at The Preserve.  The river presented these two the opportunity to interact in a way that developed a deep and lasting friendship. Today, they are inseparable.

Bubbles’ family was killed in 1981 by ivory poachers.  She was one of the fortunate few that survived the slaughter.  Today, tens of thousands of elephants are still be illegally poached for their ivory.”


Thank you Janet.


 

Sunday Morning: Taking an ordinary moment and elevating it to the iconic

“Joel Sartore is a photographer for the National Geographic. He will take 30,000 photos in a year to come up with three or four keeper photos.  Sartore has also been working on a 20-year protect called The Photo Ark, taking studio-style photos of animals to document biodiversity and call attention to endangered species. ‘The goal is for people to look these species in the eye and get them to care while there’s still time,’ said Sartore, described as a modern-day Noah.  He has photographed more than 2,650 species  and he believes ‘for many of Earth’s creatures, time is running out.  Half of the world’s plant and animal species will soon be threatened with extinction.’  Sartore believes he’ll have 5,000 to 6,000 photos of animals in The Photo Ark by the time he’s finished.”  Inspirational “Charles Kuralt” Sunday Morning-like clip.

Good Sunday Morning.

Joel Sartore, A photographer’s life from Joel Sartore on Vimeo.


Source: GrindTV

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