Silience (135 sec)


silience:

n. the kind of unnoticed excellence that carries on around you every day, unremarkably—the hidden talents of friends and coworkers, the fleeting solos of subway buskers, the slapdash eloquence of anonymous users, the unseen portfolios of aspiring artists—which would be renowned as masterpieces if only they’d been appraised by the cartel of popular taste, who assume that brilliance is a rare and precious quality, accidentally overlooking buried jewels that may not be flawless but are still somehow perfect.

Gaga, Super Lady. That’s my truth.

I wasn’t a fan of Lady Gaga’s earlier music, all too much for me. But this Lady is something special. Don’t miss this CBS Sunday Morning interview. Don’t quit on this early. (Fascinating throughout but it starts getting most interesting at 4:30). Here’s an excerpt:

“If this were all to go away tomorrow, all the big success, I would still be very happy…the reason that I’m here at all is because of my relationship with my family and their encouragement of me to be a musician, and to work hard. So, as long as I stay there, in that space, I can do anything. That’s my truth… Making your Dad happy is, especially for an Italian Catholic girl, it feels really good…And I feel that today. All the awards in the world, you can get in all the nightclubs, they’ll send you the nicest clothes, there’s nothing better than walking in your Dad’s restaurant and seeing a smile on his face, and knowing that your Mom, Dad and Sister are real proud of you and you haven’t lost touch of who you are. That for me is real success.”

“Lady Gaga is the Super Bowl halftime show expected to be watched by more than 100 million television viewers. She’s been planning for this event since she was four years old. Gaga, 30, never lip-syncs or uses backing tracks for her vocals, which has become common for high-profile events. Last year, when she belted out a blistering rendition of the national anthem at Super Bowl 50, CBS wanted an emergency backing track just in case. Gaga refused.” (Source: wsj.com)


See related post: Gaga

Tuesday Morning Wake-Up Call: A little country in between where I can be the king

Yoann-Lemoine

It’s uncomfortable because you’re never going to be an expert in every field. I’m not the best director and I’m not the best musician – and I don’t think I will ever be – but at least there is a little country in between where I can be the king. It’s probably going to be a small country, but at least I can live there happily…

I think that pressure of wanting to absolutely succeed precisely on the one thing is very toxic. I do want to succeed in general, but I’ve been asking myself, “What is success really to you?” And I’ve been thinking a lot about it and I think that success to me is to manage to be free, but also to do things that I like. It seems very stupid, but at the end of the day if I completely like and am proud of what I do, then to me it’s success.

~ Yoann Lemoine,I’m not there yet” (Director of Woodkid)


Notes:

  • Yoann Lemoine, 33, is a French music video director, graphic designer and singer-songwriter. His most notable works include his music video direction for Katy Perry’s “Teenage Dream”, Taylor Swift’s single “Back to December”, Lana Del Rey’s “Born to Die” and Mystery Jets’ “Dreaming of Another World”.
  • Quote source: Clean Well Lighted Place.
  • Photo: Moving Image

Prince (RIP)

prince

 

  • Birth name: Prince Rogers Nelson
  • Birth date: June 7, 1958 (57 years old)
  • Prince only looked tall from a far because of his cultural impact and surrounding mythos. He was only 5’2″.
  • He was named after his father, John Lewis Nelson, whose stage name was Prince Rogers. Prince’s father performed as a jazz musician in the popular group Prince Rogers Trio.
  • When he was 10 years old, he danced on stage with James Brown, the “Godfather of Soul.”
  • Spaghetti and orange juice was once “one of his favorite meals,” said Purple Rain director Albert Magnoli.
  • The “When Doves Cry” singer kept actual doves at his home, according to a Billboard’s 2013 cover story. “Approaching closer, I can see white doves, at least four or five of them, chilling inside. Their coos echo ethereally through the building as I descend the stairs.”
  • Prince had won seven Grammy Awards, and had earned 30 nominations.
  • It was Prince who wrote Sinead O’Connor’s biggest song, ‘Nothing Compares 2 U.’
  • He sadly lost a son. Boy Gregory passed away in 1996 from a rare genetic condition called Pfieffer Syndrome. He was just one-week-old.
  • After legendary performer Prince died today at his Paisley Park estate in Minnesota, many fans mourning his death noted that the occasion was appropriately rainy and used the weather to pay homage to Prince and one of his greatest hits, “Purple Rain.”

Note: Art – Prince by Kagan McLeod @kaganmcleod

Your turn. Go ahead. Light up your particle episode.

  
It is through the individual brain alone that there passes the momentary illumination in which a whole country-side may be transmuted in an instant…Man’s mind, like the expanding universe itself, is engaged in pouring over limitless horizons…The great artist, whether he is a musician, painter, or poet, is known for this absolute unexpectedness.  One does not see, one does not hear, until he speaks to us out of that limitless creativity which is his gift.

The flash of lightning in a single brain also flickers along the horizon of our more ordinary heads. Without that single lightning stroke in a solitary mind, however, the rest of us would never have known the fairyland of The Tempest, the midnight world of Dostoevsky, or the blackbirds on the yellow harvest fields of Van Gogh. We would have seen the blackbirds and endured the depravity of our own hearts, but it would not be the same landscape that the act of genius transformed. The world without Shakespeare’s insights is a lesser world, our griefs shut more inarticulately in upon themselves. We grow mute at the thought – just as an element seems to disappear from sunlight without Van Gogh. Yet these creations we might call particle episodes in the human universe – acts without precedent, a kind of disobedience of normality, unprophesiable by science, unduplicable by other individuals on demand. They are part of that unpredictable newness which keeps the universe from being fully explored by man.

Loren Eiseley, “Strangeness in the Proportion” from The Night Country


Image: eikadan

Salieri. It is not up to you whether you fly or fall.

amadeus-salieri

In Mozart’s music, Salieri recognizes something divinely inspired, absolute, and perfect. But what he hears ruins him. Confronted by this beauty beyond his ability to achieve, Salieri suffers his own talent and success in agony. “Thirty years of being called ‘distinguished’ by people incapable of distinguishing!” he cries, as the Viennese cheer him, while casually disregarding the genius in their midst. “If I cannot be Mozart then I do not wish to be anything.” He gets his wish. Mozart is posthumously declared immortal, and Salieri, still alive, is utterly forgotten, the patron saint of the undistinguished. In his last line, the old, discarded court composer addresses the modern audience directly, all those who, like him, are not worth listening to. “Mediocrities everywhere—now and to come—I absolve you all,” he says, sympathizing with our failure to be Mozart. […]

The Salieri that Shaffer created hears with the ears of history; he knows all along what only later listeners could know. When Mozart arrived in Vienna in 1781, his talent was obvious and undeniable, but his genius was still a matter of opinion. He wasn’t yet Mozart. Peter Shaffer stacked the deck against Salieri by giving his self-doubts the weight of historical certainty. Because Salieri knows Mozart is a genius, his own failure then seems inevitable. But the real weight that he and every artist—every person who strives for greatness—suffers is the weight of not knowing. You must find in yourself the courage to leap off the cliff. Yet it is not up to you whether you fly or fall.

~ Glen Kurtz, Practicing: A Musician’s Return to Music


Image Credit: vjmorton

 

Whispers


Mike Rosenberg, 29, was born in Brighton, England.  He is better known by his stage name Passenger, is an English folk-rock singer-songwriter. Rosenberg learned classical guitar when he was young: ” My parents were really encouraging about music so that sort of started the path. When I was about 14-15, I started to write songs, which were absolutely dreadful. But as I kept going the songs became better and better – it was just so bloody obvious that this was what I wanted to do. I never really applied myself in school and music was the only thing I wanted to spend my time doing…I’m heavily influenced by Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Neil Young although I’m nowhere near as good as those guys!”

Song on Whispers Album on iTunes


(Source: Wiki & Vancouver Weekly: Who is Mike Rosenberg?)

People should be waiting for their next word, not mine.

elvis_costello_10

“But please remember, I don’t sit around wondering how people see the world, or how they feel about things. I don’t attempt to express their feelings. I only write about the way I feel. I mean, I’m not arbitrator of public tastes or opinion. I don’t have a following of people who are waiting for my next word. I hope I never have that kind of following. People should be waiting for their own next word, not mine.”

– Elvis Costello


Elvis Costello, 59, born Declan Patrick Macmanus, is an English singer-songwriter. He was born in London.  He has won multiple awards in his career including a Grammy.  He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked Costello number 80 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Costello’s first broadcast recording was alongside his dad, also a musician, in a television commercial for R. White’s Lemonade (I’m a Secret Lemonade Drinker). His father wrote and sang the song; Costello provided backing vocals. Costello married Canadian piano-vocalist Diana Krall in May 2003, and married her at the home of Elton John.  Krall gave birth to twin sons, Dexter Henry Lorcan and Frank Harlan James, on 6 December 2006 in New York City.  A vegetarian since the early 1980s, Costello says he was moved to reject meat after seeing the documentary The Animals Film (1982), which also helped inspire his song “Pills and Soap” from 1983’s Punch the Clock). (Source: Wiki)

 Credits: Portrait – By James O’Mara. Quote Source – apoetreflects. Bio – Wiki.

Why settle for cash when joy is on the line

Jon_Foreman,_April_2008

“You want to know the meaning of life? This is your highest calling: You are called into the dynamic co-creation of the cosmos. This breath is your canvas and your brush. These are the raw materials for your art, for the life you are making. Nothing is off limits. Your backyard, your piano, your paint brush, your conversation, Rwanda, New Orleans, Iraq, your marriage, your soul. You’re making a living with every step you take. So when you make a living, do not merely make money. Why settle for cash when joy is on the line? You feel a thrill when you dance, when you sing, when you finish your poem; even when you sweep the room you see order pressing back against the chaos. So when you create, never settle for making a living — at least not the way that the world might define that phrase. When you make a living, you are speaking a new world into existence. You are creating grace within the confines, you are co-signing God’s blank checks.”

~ Jon Foreman, Lead Singer & Guitarist of Switchfoot. Excerpt from Meaning of Life.


Image Credit: Wiki. Quote Source: ThePoetoaster


Friday Night: Passenger


Mike Rosenberg, 29, was born in Brighton, England.  He is better known by his stage name Passenger, is an English folk-rock singer-songwriter. His nickname comes from the folk-rock band of which he was the founder, main vocalist and songwriter, and which released just one album. When the members of the band chose to go their own separate ways in 2009, Rosenberg opted to keep the band’s name for his solo work. His most successful single “Let Her Go” has topped the charts in 16 countries so far.

Rosenberg learned classical guitar when he was young: ” My parents were really encouraging about music so that sort of started the path. When I was about 14-15, I started to write songs, which were absolutely dreadful. But as I kept going the songs became better and better – it was just so bloody obvious that this was what I wanted to do. I never really applied myself in school and music was the only thing I wanted to spend my time doing…I’m heavily influenced by Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Neil Young although I’m nowhere near as good as those guys!”

Song on All the Little Lights Album on iTunes

(Source: Wiki & Vancouver Weekly: Who is Mike Rosenberg?)

%d bloggers like this: