It’s like a great oak that rises up from the center of the human race and spreads its branches everywhere

Choral music is not one of life’s frills. It’s something that goes to the very heart of our humanity, our sense of community, and our souls. You express, when you sing, your soul in song. And when you get together with a group of other singers, it becomes more than the sum of the parts. All of those people are pouring out their hearts and souls in perfect harmony. Which is kind of an emblem for what we need in this world, when so much of the world is at odds with itself…that just to express, in symbolic terms, what it’s like when human beings are in harmony. That’s a lesson for our times and for all time. I profoundly believe that.And musical excellence is, of course, at the heart of it. But, even if a choir is not the greatest in the world, the fact that they are meeting together has a social value. It has a communal value. And I always say that a church or a school without a choir is like a body without a soul. We have to have a soul in our lives. And everybody tells me, who has sung in a choir, that they feel better for doing it. That whatever the cares of the day, if they maybe meet after a long day’s school or work, that somehow you leave your troubles at the door. And when you’re sitting there, making music for a couple hours at the end of the day, that’s the only thing that matters at that moment. And you walk away refreshed. You walk away renewed. And that’s a value that goes just beyond the music itself.

Of course, as a musician, I put the music at the heart of it, but all of these other values just stand out as a beacon. I think our politicians need to take note…my gosh do they ever! [laughs], and our educators, those who decide education budgets, church budgets, just need to remember it’s not a frill. It’s like a great oak that rises up from the center of the human race and spreads its branches everywhere. That’s what music does for us. And choral music must stand as one of the supreme examples of it.

John RutterThe Importance of Choir


Thank you Beth @ Alive on All Channels

Seramic

When Seramic introduced himself with “People Say” in January, the mysterious London artist told us, “I just want the music to speak for itself for now.” Sticking to his word, he hasn’t released any more photos or information about himself, opting to share new music instead. (Source: Pigeons & Planes)

Sunday Morning: I Found


And I fallen in love where I wasn’t supposed to be
Right in front of me, talk some sense to me


Amber Run are a five piece band from Nottingham, UK formed in 2012.  London Contemporary Voices is one of London’s leading non-traditional choirs. They specialise in work with established artists such as festivals, gigs and recording. They regularly put on their own concerts, covering a broad repertoire leaning towards contemporary popular and leftfield music. They are a young mixed-voice choir of 40 singers, all auditioned to a high standard.

Wim Mertens


Thank you Keith at 3Bones for introducing me to Wim Mertens.  Mertens, 60, is a Flemish Belgian composer, countertenor vocalist, pianist, guitarist, and musicologist.  Let’s just say I’m transported.

Vocals come in at 1:40.


Friday Night: Laura Mvula


Laura Mvula (née Douglas), 27, is a British soul singer-songwriter from the U.K. Her debut album Sing to the Moon was released in March 2013. In 2005, Mvula sang with an a cappella group set up by her aunt. In 2008, she formed a jazz/neo-soul group called Judyshouse, singing lead vocals and wrote material for the band. She is also Director of a Community Gospel Choir, founded by Black Voices. While she was working as a supply teacher in a Birmingham secondary school, she started writing songs on her laptop. She was working as a receptionist when she sent out two demos to several people in the music industry. The Guardian described her music as “gospeldelia”, calling it a new musical genre.  In December 2012, Mvula was shortlisted for the Critics’ Choice award at the 2013 BRIT Awards. In December 2012, she was nominated for the BBC’s Sound of 2013 poll, and finished in fourth position.  (Source: Wiki)

 


Sunday Morning: Amazing Grace

It’s an Amazing Grace feeling-kind-of-morning.  Here’s Rodney Britt and friends with 53-second clip, which I wished kept going and going.


And from a simple, spiritual, soulful version – – we move to the soul stirring pipes.  Amazing Grace hits a crescendo after 4:00 minutes.   [Read more…]

Sunday Morning in Sabadell

We’re sticking with the flash mob theme, riding the community spirit, the family, and the wholesomeness train – – until we drive the darkness completely out.  This clip, now seen by over 8 million on Youtube, is performed by 100 musicians and choir members from the Vallès Symphony Orchestra, the Lieder, Amics de l’Òpera and Coral Belles Arts choirs.  They play the final movement of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony in the town square of Sabadell, Spain.  Just check out the faces and the joy this event brings to the performers and the audience.  Good Sunday morning to you.


Thank you Michael for sharing this wonderful piece.  Happy Holiday to you and your family.

I was also reminded that today is Beethoven’s birthday (1770).

Minding your own business at a food court and…

BAM! A Christmas caroling flash mob. A whisker under 40 million views on Youtube. 100 Chorus Niagara members spread throughout the dining crowd at the Welland, Ontario food court surreptitiously. And then…they light it up. Check out the faces…priceless. VOLUME UP.


Noted that this event occurred in 2010.  I must be the only adult Canadian who hasn’t seen the clip.  Thank you John E. Smith for the inspiration. Check out John’s post for another Flash Mob in Philadelphia.

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