Gloam·ing (n) twilight; dusk. Just One More Listen

Shelley Rainey: A beautifully relaxing album. Lie back, close your eyes and let the music wash over you.

Ian CrippsSometimes music stops you in your tracks, sometimes you have to listen, sometimes nothing else matters. Moments that stretch time…This is traditional Irish music played with emotion, with joy for the most part, with sadness occasionally, with beauty always…this is simply music that moves you…Twelve tracks, over an hour of listening but it’s not, you get to the end and hit play again. And again. And time passes, the day has gone and still you are mesmerized. At times reflective, haunting, peaceful, happy this album runs the full gambit of emotions. You don’t want it to end. It doesn’t have to. Just one more listen.

The The Gloaming’s second album can be found here: “2”


Source: Thank you Hammock Papers

Being Irish is very much a part of who I am. I take it everywhere with me.

green-relax


Notes:

Saoirse Una Ronan

Saoirse-Ronan-3

She is the second youngest two-time Academy Award nominee in history receiving a Best Supporting Actress nomination in Atonement (2007) and a Best Actress nomination for her role in Brooklyn (2015).  Saoirse Ronan, is a 21 year old Irish-American actress born in the Bronx, NY.

If you missed CBS Sunday Morning this morning, DON’T MISS Jane Pauley’s interview of Saoirse Una Ronan found at the video clip here:

CBS Sunday Morning: Saoirse Ronan, from screen to stage

JP: I remember reading that early fame is particularly challenging for young women.

SR: I’m not surprised that it affects young women more because there is more pressure not only for the superficial stuff – the way we look – the way we are all compared to each other – what we wear and how that’s compared to what someone else may wear on a red carpet for example, but even beyond that when it comes to success it’s almost something you have to be apologetic about.

It’s very weird to have your face plastered all over, even though I do get quite shy about that sort of stuff, there is something about seeing your name or your face attached to a Broadway theatre that makes you say, oh wow, this is a bit of a dream.

And don’t miss this video clip where Jane Pauley reads lines with Ronan:

Saoirse Ronan runs lines with Jane Pauley

Her other film roles include parts in The Lovely Bones (2009), Hanna (2011), The Way Back (2010), Byzantium (2012), The Host (2013), and The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014).

Let’s just say that this young lady is inspiring…


Image: wallpapers

Being Irish is very much a part of who I am. I take it everywhere with me

St. Patrick's Day, paint


Source: Muffy Takes Manhattan. Quote: Colin Farrell

James Joyce. His Bell Tolls (for me).

It continues to haunt. James Joyce and Ulysses. Unfinished, brooding on my book shelf. I first discussed his book in a earlier post: Just Can’t Finish. Then I tripped into this video. Luck? I don’t think so. It’s time. Time to pull it off the shelf and give it another whack…

Larry Kirwan, 71, Irish writer and musician, on James Joyce:

Never once did he doubt his own genius, and God knows he had a awfully hard life. He became almost blind to his always broke, always borrowing. And yet he knew his strength. His strength for story, and words and music. I think we read him because of his music and his rhythms.  Catching the soul of a person. And catching the inner dialogue, say in the Molly Bloom thing, you could never have met a woman and read Molly Bloom and know what a woman is about. He’s that strong a writer to me.

Frank Delaney, 71, Irish journalist, author and broadcaster, on James Joyce:

This is what he does better than anyone else. He understands the tiny sins, the tiny virtues, the tiny venalities, the tiny advantages that people will look for in life. And nobody else ever did that before and nobody, I would contend, has done it as well since.


May your gravity be lightened by grace

dancer in wind gif

For Equilibrium, a Blessing:

Like the joy of the sea coming home to shore,
May the relief of laughter rinse through your soul.

As the wind loves to call things to dance,
May your gravity by lightened by grace.

Like the dignity of moonlight restoring the earth,
May your thoughts incline with reverence and respect.

As water takes whatever shape it is in,
So free may you be about who you become.

As silence smiles on the other side of what’s said,
May your sense of irony bring perspective.

As time remains free of all that it frames,
May your mind stay clear of all it names.

May your prayer of listening deepen enough
to hear in the depths the laughter of god.”

― John O’Donohue, To Bless the Space Between Us: A Book of Blessings


John O’Donohue (1 January 1956 – 4 January 2008) was an Irish poet, author, priest, and Hegelian philosopher. He was a native Irish speaker, and as an author is best known for popularizing Celtic spirituality.  O’Donohue said: “Part of understanding the notion of Justice is to recognize the disproportions among which we live…it takes an awful lot of living with the powerless to really understand what it is like to be powerless, to have your voice, thoughts, ideas and concerns count for very little. We, who have been given much, whose voices can be heard, have a great duty and responsibility to make our voices heard with absolute integrity for those who are powerless.


Sources: Image – Thank you Anake Goodall. O’Donohue Blessing: Good Reads. O’Donohue Bio: Wiki.

Related O’Donohue Post:

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