Guess What Day It Is?


Notes:

  • Photo by Jo Ann Tomaselli on the outskirts of the ancient city of Jaisalmer which is located in the district of Rajasthan. “The camel grunted, the driver smiled and as he clicked his tongue and shook sand from his shoes these two partners, the mammal and the man, put on a delightful show; they danced in the desert just for me!  The camel drivers & their camels live in a small Bedouin village in the Thar Desert on the boarder between India and Pakistan. Daily, a small group of drivers leave their home and journey across the vast outdoor landscape of sand and sun, bringing traditional transportation to adventure seeking tourists such as myself. After a long day of exploration, I dismounted my dromedary to take in the vastness of the dry eastern desert and watch the sunset. And that’s when they did it! They started dancing!”
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

Guess What Day It Is?


Dallol Ethiopia, January 22nd: A camel caravan carrying salt mined by hand is led across a salt plain in the Danakil Depression on January 22, 2017 near Dallol, Ethiopia. The depression lies 100 metres below sea level and is one of the hottest and most inhospitable places on Earth. Despite the gruelling conditions, Ethiopians continue a centuries old industry of mining salt from the ground by hand in temperatures that average 34.5 degrees centigrade but have risen to over 50 degrees. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images) Thank you Christie!

Notes:  Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

 

Welcome Home Dad

Adisalem Abu embraces his twin daughters after meeting them for the first time in 18 years on the end of conflict between Ethiopia and Eritrea. (Tiksa Negeri, wsj.com, July 18, 2018)

There is nothing, and there is not one bloody thing.

mary-louise-parker-aberash-daughter

In September, 2007, Mary-Louise Parker adopted a child from an orphanage in Ethiopia.  The child’s Uncle walked a distance that Parker stated she would complain if she had to travel to in a car. The journey was made with his children, three of which were under 10. The baby was carried on his hip. This excerpt is from a letter written by Parker (“Dear Uncle“) as a tribute to him.  In their first meeting, he said: “I hope that she will be taken care of, go to school and perhaps one day be something, a doctor.”


There are so many reductive adjectives used to describe those materially less fortunate, words the privileged use to anoint them. Words like proud, or graceful…It never rings true. Having seen what I saw when you brought me to the hut where my daughter was born, and introduced me to the people in your village, I felt like I was hovering over every judgment of my reality and yours, unable to land. None of the families I met were intact, everyone had lost children, parents, or a spouse. There was not enough of anything for anyone. The only bounty was in categories of suffering or possible ways to die. I didn’t feel them looking at me with distance, they all smiled and shook my hand.

I hid my embarrassment at how stupid I felt when I entered your hut and was alarmed by the darkness that swallowed me despite it being late morning. Of course I knew there was no electricity, no light would be there except for what might creep in through that ceiling of straw. I knew it, but I couldn’t fathom it until I stood inside with you and stared at an actual nothingness and my eyes adjusted to near black. There is nothing, and there is not one bloody thing. As you pointed at different parts of the hut that were designated for the cows to sleep, or the spot where your family of twelve eats when there is food, or where you slept, I saw spots with absolutely nothing in them. There was an absence of comment on your situation that made you seem twenty feet tall. It’s something I could never know if I hadn’t stood there, with you showing me what life is like on another planet where there is no complaining, or showing disappointment. [Read more…]

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camel


Caleb and his friends: “Say Cheese”

Find more @ Fine Dining Lovers: “Milking It In Africa: Ethiopian Camel Cheese


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