Shinto

dandelion-art-color-orange

When misfortune confounds us
in an instant we are saved
by the humblest actions
of memory or attention:
the taste of fruit, the taste of water,
that face returned to us in dream,
the first jasmine flowers of November,
the infinite yearning of the compass,
a book we thought forever lost,
the pulsing of a hexameter,
the little key that opens a house,
the smell of sandalwood or library,
the ancient name of a street,
the colourations of a map,
an unforeseen etymology,
the smoothness of a filed fingernail,
the date that we were searching for,
counting the twelve dark bell-strokes,
a sudden physical pain.

Eight million the deities of Shinto
who travel the earth, secretly.
Those modest divinities touch us,
touch us, and pass on by.

– Jorge Luis Borges


‘Shinto is the indigenous faith of the Japanese people. In general, Shinto is more than a religion and encompasses the ideas, attitudes, and ways of doing things that have become an integral part of the Japanese people for the better part of 2000 years. The ancient Japanese never divided spiritual and material existence, but considered that both were inseparable, seeing everything in a spiritual sense. Shinto, unlike other major religions, does not have a founder, nor does it possess sacred scriptures or texts. Shinto practices can be roughly summed up by the four affirmations:

  1. Tradition and family
  2. Love of nature – The kami are an integral part of nature.
  3. Physical cleanliness – Purification rites are an important part of Shinto
  4. Festivals and ceremonies – Dedicated to honoring and amusing the kami”

Credits: Poem Source: Mystic Medusa.  Image: Mme Scherzo. Shinto Definition: About.com, Jinja Honcho


 

Comments

  1. The key of course is recognizing when the universe is sending your surcease from one’s troubles. Happy Sunday Dave.

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  2. lovely, the balance in the universe. i may be an unwitting shinto myself, for i so love to celebrate everything and adore festivals and ceremonies, the more unusual or tinier or abstract the better.

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  3. Ahhh.. For sunday morning this is way too deep to digest but interesting though and am glad that a new term has been added in my dictionary.

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  4. It IS amazing how the smallest of encounters can bring succor–I know for myself, if I’m feeling off kilter, a familiar smell or a cherished song can bring me back to center.

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  5. A way of balance is always a good way. Happy Sunday David.

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  6. “in an instant we are saved.” Yes, and yes. I must reblog.

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  7. Reblogged this on A Mind Divided.

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  8. barbara allison says:

    thanks for the reminder, Sandy

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  1. Anonymous says:

    […] Shinto – Lead.Learn.Live. https://davidkanigan.com/'Shinto is the indigenous faith of the Japanese people. In general, Shinto is more than a religion and encompasses the ideas, attitudes, and ways of doing things that have become an integral part of the Japanese people for … […]

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  2. Anonymous says:

    […] Shinto – Lead.Learn.Live. https://davidkanigan.com/dandelion-art-color-orange. When misfortune confounds us in an instant we are saved by the humblest actions of memory or attention: the taste of fruit, the taste of water, that face returned to us in dream, the first jasmine … […]

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  3. […] LEAD.LEARN.LIFE. David Kanigan- Shinto (SEPTEMBER 15, 2013 BY DAVID KANIGAN) https://davidkanigan.com/2013/09/15/shinto/ […]

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