Source: Mennyfox55

Only the light moves


We went down into the silent garden.
Dawn is the time when nothing breathes,
the hour of silence.
Everything is transfixed,
only the light moves.

— Leonora Carrington, The House of Fear.

Notes: Image – Colorful Gradients. Quote: The Vale of Soul-Making


Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Two years from now I can hear people saying: Your play is extraordinary. And my answer: It took me ten years to perfect my craftsmanship. I am wrestling with giants here. Every morning I wake up in a sweat, ready for the struggle. The impact is great, but I am never defeated. It is the rehearsals I miss, to attend them and see the progress the actors make. My being there is an absolute necessity. My eye and ear criticize every move and every intonation. I listen to the “commas” of the play as if they were drops falling from a fountain. Dis moi comment vont tout tes affaires. I am alone.

~ James Salter, Light Years


Being Irish is very much a part of who I am. I take it everywhere with me.



Button Fly In a Cage



“South Korean, New York-based artist Ran Hwang uses buttons from the fashion industry to create large-scale, often immersive installations. Ran Hwang borrows materials from the fashion industry and create large iconic figures such as a Buddha with a cherry blossom growing from its head. In other works, a traditional vase simultaneously connotes both fullness and emptiness and a wingless bird trapped in a prison cell can no longer fly.”  Find Ran Hwang’s other art works at her website here.

Source: Your Eyes Blaze Out


1/2 ounce and a beacon in the darkness

The NY Times has an average circulation exceeding 2,000,000 readers daily. And the story that ranked as “Most Popular” yesterday, amidst a deluge of daily news bleakness, was this one:

NY Times: Painted Bunting, a Rare Visitor to Brooklyn, Gives Birders Cause to Stare


“The object of fascination was a male painted bunting, an avian connoisseur of grassland never before seen in Brooklyn — and rarely found much north of Arkansas — that has drawn crowds of bird-watchers to Prospect Park since its discovery on Sunday.

“…for 30 breathtaking seconds, he put on a show, no binoculars necessary, flitting up into a bare serviceberry shrub, then darting right across the path to land in a patch of orange winterberries until a mockingbird swooped in and chased him off.  Scott Schulman, the manager of LeFrak Center, who happened to wander up the hill just in time, looked around in wonder.

“That was remarkable, to say the least,” he said. “Wow.”


Image Credits: #1 – Kirsten Luce.  #2: Daisylanepaul

Perspective (noun): An Anvil Dropped On Your Head.


It was 11:30 am this morning.
A bruising day and still on the wrong side of noon.
A meeting. A call. Another call. Another Call. A meeting. Another meeting.
And triple tasking, banging out emails during calls and reorganizing tomorrow’s calendar.
Then, a break in the storm.
Get off your a**.  Now!  Take a walk. Sitting is killing you. And if not that, the urine backup may get you first.

I grab my smartphone and scan the subject headings of my personal emails.
Half way down my in-box, my eye catches text in the subject line: “live and learn suggestion.
All in lower case.
The antennae clicks up a notch.  High probability of spam soliciting SEO help or telling me my blog sucks and I need professional help.

My thumb slides up to the DELETE key. [Read more…]

Francoise Nielly


My Modern Met, Vibrant Palette Knife Portraits Radiate Raw EmotionsWith bold strokes and vibrant colors, each of Francoise Nielly’s paintings exude raw emotion. Dabbling in a variety of mediums before settling into painting, Nielly has developed a trademark palette knife technique and with each aggressive stroke of oil paint on canvas, the artist sculpts these explosive images. The knife work allows her a full range of movement and the resulting portraits are expressive and unique, distinct faces emerging from the same paints.”

Francoise Nielly: “It’s known that the childhood is one of the most important periods of an artist’s life. When you close your eyes and think about those years, what colors and what kind of memories do you see? …I also nice times, like summer in Cavalaire where we lived on the Mediteranéan side, building huts and cabins and hunting butterflies. I have vivid images of colors, of brightness. Yellow, sunshine, blue, heat, cicadas, pin smell, light… all of that classical imagery of South France is very alive as an experience inside of me. Maybe it is what led me to the use of fluorescent colors in my paintings.

See more art by Francoise Nielly at Francoise-nielly.com and at My Modern Met.

Source: My Modern Met

I don’t do sterile, formal pictures

Hans Feurer is considered one of the leading figures in fashion photography. His genre-defining career spans fifty years.  Since the early 1960’s, this man with a passion for Africa and travel pursues the idea of fashion photography as the tracking of a wild animal. Clothes and skin are light as the feathers of a bird with impressive panache. It was in Africa that Feurer discovered his exceptional sensibility for light and his love for the natural wonders of the continent. Strong influences of his travels are evident in the inherent sense of adventure Feurer’s images convey, as well as the raw, expressive quality of his photographs.

Feurer’s female figure is strong and ferocious, sensual and uninhibited, moving effortlessly, her expressions reflecting intensity and vigour. Crucial to Feurer’s work is to capture a very particular moment where an emotion reveals itself in the movement of the model and the scene truly comes to life. ‘I don’t do sterile, formal pictures’, Feurer describes his process of capturing that elusive moment. ‘I like to make pictures that provoke an emotion and affect you in your feelings. For that, both the woman and the clothes need to come alive.'”

Find Feurer’s website here: hansfeurer.com

BodyPaint painted by Kodak Switzerland, 1987; photograph by Hans Feurer; Model Gitta Sack.

Source: This Isn’t Happiness

Drive. And come alive.

Grant-haffner-1 Grant-haffner-2

East Hampton, Long Island-based artist Grant Haffner paints vivid landscapes inspired by the beautiful country roads and bodies of water of his hometown. Using acrylic, marker, and pencil on wood panel, the painter deconstructs the road scene into a striking series of graphic lines and eye-catching colors. Each image captures the exciting feeling of driving for miles down empty highways—watching power lines pass by in a blur, feeling the dips and turns of the road beneath the wheels, and enjoying the boundless expanse of sky overhead.

“When I drive I feel completely alive,” Haffner says on his Saatchi Art profile. “For a small moment, in between this place and that, I am free from reality. My truck and I become a motion of blurred color, barreling through space and time. I like to keep my window open to listen to the sounds that traveling makes, to enjoy the smell of the landscape. Every trip is a new one, not one sunset is the same. On the road I am a part of the painting. I am movement, color, sound, adventure and emotions. This is my landscape.”

~ Jenny Zhang, Gorgeous Pastel Paintings Capture the Endless Freedom of the Open Road



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