Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

  • Humps and hair. That’s the scene in Bulgan Soum, a tiny Mongolian town in the middle of the Gobi Desert about 160 miles north of the Chinese border. Bactrian camels arrive in all directions on foot, bearing bundled-up riders wedged between their two humps. It’s early March. While the sky is cloudless, the wind can pick up quickly. Officially called the Thousand Camel Festival, the crowd that arrives for the kickoff appears to consist of 100 camels. The two-day festival begins with a camel beauty pageant.”  Don’t miss full story and video at NPR: Where Camels Become Beauty Queens: Inside Mongolia’s Biggest Camel Festival. (Thank you Moira for sharing!)
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

  • Photo: NatGeo – Bactrian camels have two humps on their backs where they store fat. Arabian camels, called dromedaries have only one hump, but both these types of camels use their stored fat as energy and water when they are far away from food and a freshwater source. Bactrians’ nostrils close to block sand, and their bushy eyebrows and two rows of long eyelashes protect their eyes from blowing sand and ice. Baby camels are born with their eyes open and can run when only a few hours old. Camels move both legs on one side of the body forward at the same time, like giraffes and race horses. This is called pacing. The only truly wild camels that still exist are Bactrian camels. These herds survive in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia and China, but number less than 400. They are critically endangered in the wild.
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?


Notes:

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