Plunge

melissa-cook-drawing-bath

Melissa Cooke‘s (b. Oconomowoc, WI, 1982) drawings are made by dusting thin layers of graphite onto paper with a dry brush.  The softness of the graphite provides a smooth surface that can be augmented by erasing in details and textures.  

No pencils are used in the work, allowing the surface to glow without the shine of heavy pencil marks.  Illusion dissolves into brush work and the honesty of the material.

“In 2012, I moved to New York City from Wisconsin,” Cooke says regarding her inspiration behind the series. “Unaccustomed to city living, I am frequently overwhelmed. The bathtub has become a respite from this chaos, and a substitution for the calming comfort of Midwest lakes. Commotion is muffled underwater. Submerged, I am in the quiet, weightless in a space of reflection.”

Don’t miss more of Cooke’s drawings here: Melissa Cooke


Source: My Modern Met

Zaria Forman

waves,ocean,water,wave,

Beautiful photographs, right? I thought so.  Then, I clicked through to find that this was titled: “The Maldives: soft pastel on paper.”  Don’t miss Forman’s icebergs at “Greenland 2012” and her set design for “Giselle: Stairwell” along with her complete portfolio of drawings here.  Let’s just say that I am awed by her work.

zaria forman,pastel,art


Source: Zaria Forman.  Forman is a 2001 graduate of Green Meadow Waldorf School in Chestnutridge, MO and a 2005 graduate of Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY, where she received her formal training.  In addition to exhibitions, recent projects included a series of drawings that served as the set design for the classic ballet Giselle, which premiered in October 2012 at the Grand Theatre of Geneva, Switzerland (see drawings and performance photos here). Ten of her drawings were also used in the set design for House of Cards, a Netflix TV series directed by David Fincher and starring Kevin Spacey. 


The tip of a black court shoe peeking through a half-open door

Rene-Gruau

What do you see above?
Don’t ask me how long I stared at this illustration by René Gruau trying to figure it out.
Consolation was offered when no one else in the household could figure it out either.
And then, I did a bit of scouting…

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