Where do sentences come from?

Sift the debris of a young writer’s education, and you find dreadful things — strictures, prohibitions, dos, don’ts, an unnatural and nearly neurotic obsession with style, argument and transition. Yet in that debris you find no traces of a fundamental question: where do sentences come from? This is a philosophical question, as valuable in the asking as in the answering. But it’s a practical question, too. Think about it long enough, and you begin to realize that many, if not most, of the things we believe about writing are false…”

[Read more…]

Language Lesson 1 and 2…*

lessonThere was (is?) a number of enthusiastic fans of Saturday’s post titled Sloppy is as sloppy does…(Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!).  If you haven’t seen the post, it’s (its?) worth a peak.  The punch line?  Bad grammar and punctuation are (is?) bad.

So, wouldn’t you know it, LaDona (Piano Teacher extraordinaire) proceeds to proof read my old post titled: Who would have thought…

I made the mistake of checking my emails before bed time to find an email flashing from LaDona.  She took the courtesy of sending me a private email rather than censuring (aka humiliating) me in public in the comment section of my post.  (So Canadian of her!)

“Dave, you seem to be heading a campaign to clean up some bad writing habits (and rightly so!), so you might want to take care of the rogue apostrophes in the Zeke post. They are still not supposed to be used to denote plurals unless they show plural possession.  Kanigan’s is incorrect in this usage, as are most appearances of Viszla’s.”

[Read more…]

Sloppy is as sloppy does…(Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HBR Blog Network – I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.

…Some might call my approach to grammar extreme…I am a grammar "stickler…I have a "zero tolerance approach" to grammar mistakes that make people look stupid.…Everyone who applies for a position at either of my companies…takes a mandatory grammar test…if job hopefuls can’t distinguish between "to" and "too," their applications go into the bin.

…Good grammar is credibility, especially on the internet. In blog posts, on Facebook statuses, in e-mails, and on company websites, your words are all you have. They are a projection of you in your physical absence. And, for better or worse, people judge you if you can’t tell the difference between their, there, and they’re.

[Read more…]

%d bloggers like this: