House on Fire


Photo: Wildlife rescuer Simon Adamczyk carries a koala out of a burning forest to safety on Kangaroo Island, southwest of Adelaide, Australia, on January 7, 2020. Photograph by David Mariuz.

The Atlantic: Animals Rescued From Australia’s Bushfires. January 9, 2020:

“The horrific wildfires that have been burning across Australia for months now have taken a severe toll on the animals that called the scorched lands home. Estimates of the number of animals killed by the fires range from hundreds of millions to more than 1 billion. Volunteers and crews from Australia’s National Parks and Wildlife Service have been doing what they can to help some of the kangaroos, koalas, lizards, and birds that can be rescued and treated. Ranchers and pet owners have been working to keep the animals in their care secure when possible, but many farm animals have been killed as well. As much as one-third of Australia’s Kangaroo Island has burned so far, with wildlife experts fearing that more than half of the island’s 50,000 koalas have been killed.”

No. Nightmare…


Photo: Marcus Yam, Ventura, California Wildfires (December 5, 2017). His statement: “This is a recurring scene in my dreams.”

Wow, I am sorry

Death comes with raising cattle: coyotes, blizzards and the inevitable trip to the slaughterhouse and dinner plate. But after 30 years of ranching, Mark and Mary Kaltenbach were not ready for what met them after a wildfire charred their land and more than one million acres of rain-starved range this month.

Dozens of their Angus cows lay dead on the blackened ground, hooves jutting in the air. Others staggered around like broken toys, unable to see or breathe, their black fur and dark eyes burned, plastic identification tags melted to their ears. Young calves lay dying.

Ranching families across this countryside are now facing an existential threat to a way of life that has sustained them since homesteading days: years of cleanup and crippling losses after wind-driven wildfires across Kansas, Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle killed seven people and devoured homes, miles of fences and as much as 80 percent of some families’ cattle herds.

But for many, the first job after the fire passed was loading a rifle.

“You think you’re done,” he said, “and the next day you got to go shoot more.”

For decades and generations, ranching has defined people’s days. Mr. Kaltenbach would wake up at 4:30 a.m. without an alarm clock…“It’s our life,” Mrs. Kaltenbach, 57, said. “We lost our routine.”

“We did what had to be done,” Mr. Kaltenbach, 69, said. “They’re gentle. They know us. We know them. You just thought, ‘Wow, I am sorry.’”

~ Jack Healy, Burying Their Cattle, Ranchers Call Wildfires ‘Our Hurricane Katerina’


Notes:

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

rocket-explosion-tgif-T.G.I.F


Notes:

  • This is a photo of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket explosion by an eyewitness in Cape Canaveral, Florida at 9:07 a.m. on Thursday, September 1. Thankfully, no people were near the rocket while the propellant was being loaded, so there were no injuries from the blast. More background information at Business Insider.
  • Youtube of explosion here.
  • Image source: this isn’t happiness

 

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week!

fire-retardent-magenta


Source: Noah Berger via telegraph (via this isn’t happiness). A plane drops fire retardant while battling the Soberane Fire in Carmel Highlands, California.

Guess.What.Day.It.Is?

camels,Kuwait,Ahmadi Oil Fields,war

Let’s hope not (War).

Camels at the Ahmadi Oil Fields in Kuwait in 1991 during the Persian Gulf War.  Don’t miss Steve McCurry‘s photo series titled War.


Notes: Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again

T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week

TGIF-T.G.I.F.-funny-fire


Source: Bunsen

Fire Painter


French Canadian artist Steve Spazuk is from Lery, Quebec. Here’s his bio from Spazuk.com:

For the past 14 years, Spazuk has developed and perfected a unique technique that allows him to use the flame of a candle or the flame of a torch as a pencil to create his paintings with trails of soot. Using various tools, he intuitively sculpt the plumes of soot left behind in response to the shapes that appear on the canvas.

Spontaneity and chance are the heart and soul of his creative process. He does not censor. He does not direct. Spazuk opens himself to the experience. This in-the-moment creative practice coupled with the fluidity of the soot, creates a torrent of images, shadows and light. Fuelled by the quest of a perfect shape that has yet to materialize, he concentrate in a meditative act and surrender to capture the immediacy of the moment on canvas.

The human body fascinates him. Bodies in a perpetual metamorphosis are the language with which he express his thoughts on the human condition: emotions, opinions, stories that are born of his uncensored psyche. Spazuk often works piece by piece, collecting a multitude of unique elements that he assembles into mosaics.  Entities that, once grouped together, afford a different meaning and provide a new perspective that is both novel and complementary. He sees fragments of things, events, people, as a powerful metaphor of modern life and, even more so, of the way we perceive things through our senses and our minds. His work expresses how every one of us is a constituent fragment of the human community.

Check out an interview with Steve Spazuk and more of his work here.

Be sure to check out his website and his gallery of portraits here: Steve Spazuk Portraits.  Wow!

Here’s a self-portrait:

[Read more…]

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