The Heart

red-coat-hands

It’s 4 a.m.  Zeke’s asleep on my right, his front legs are stiff armed, fully extended and laying on my chest. No, on my Heart. But for his breathing, I could be laying in bed in the “world’s quietest room“, so completely quiet that I can hear my own organs pumping.  The hypnotic page-turning ride continued:

“She paces the room. If this is a donation, it’s a pretty unusual one, she thinks. There is no donor in this operation— no one intended to make a donation— and likewise there is no donee, because she is not in a position to refuse the organ: she has to accept it if she wants to survive. So what is it exactly? The recycling of an organ that can still be used, can still fulfill its function as a pump? She begins to undress, sitting on the bed: she removes her boots, her socks. The meaning of this transfer, for which she was selected by an incredible alignment of coincidences— the almost perfect compatibility of her blood and her genetic code with those of someone who died today— all of this becomes hazy. She does not like this feeling of unearned privilege; this lottery, it’s like winning a little stuffed animal snagged by the metal claw from a jumble of toys piled behind glass in one of those arcade games. Worst of all is that she will never be able to say thank you; that is the crux of the matter. It’s simply impossible. Thank you— that radiant phrase— will fall into the void. She will never be able to express any kind of gratitude to the donor or the donor’s family, never mind offer a gift in return in order to free herself from this infinite debt, and the idea that she will be permanently trapped crosses her mind. The floor is ice-cold under her feet. She is afraid. Her whole being flinches…

She hopes that she will be able to kiss her sons before she puts on this tissue-paper gown that flutters without covering her up, making her feel as if she is naked in a breeze. Her eyes remain dry, but she is struggling to get her head around the enormity of what she is about to go through. Placing her hand there, between her breasts, she feels her pulse, still slightly too fast in spite of the medication, still somewhat unpredictable too, and says its name out loud: heart.”

~ Maylis de Kerangal, The Heart: A Novel

I’m done but it won’t be done with me – ever – an unforgettable story.


Notes:

Comments

  1. powerful words – i’m going to read this.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I translated once for a heart transplant recipient.
    He said to me “… but I didn’t buy the ticket, am I dreaming? It’s like winning the lottery but I don’t recall buying a ticket”

    Thank you for all you’ve shared from this book.
    I don’t think my “Heart” can handle reading the whole thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ok. I’m convinced. It’s going on my list.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wow. That is all.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Yes wow.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi, David, I’ve missed you and this post is only one of the reasons why. May I ask, how do you possibly read all the books you subsequently recommend? I’m finding it difficult to keep up with you and as for my husband, all he can say is “ANOTHER BOOK?)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. The article was inspiring, but I must be honest. Where do you find such fantastic art? The red dress transcends the written word this evening.

    Liked by 1 person

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