Lightly Child, Lightly.

Sometimes I get tired of the everythingness of everything, so I retreat to my bed and read. I read and let time fly like a bird that’s hit by a truck, and I’m in a place where peace is timeless. I overthink about doing everything that I need to do all at once, that I drown in the anxiety of heaviness. Reading is coming up to the surface to breathe, and I am learning to perceive before I judge. I am learning to refine my mind before taking action, and I am learning to think with my heart. Because literature, fantasy, and getting my mind caught in the clouds … these are the things that inspire me to live better in reality. And so I close my book, draw the curtains and let the light in everything I’m supposed to do and let the chapter of today be enough.”

— Juansen Dizon, “A Diary Entry about Reading” from The Boy Who Cries Wolf


Notes:

  • Quote: Thank you Beth @ Alive on All Channels
  • Photo Credit
  • Post inspired by: “There is no better use of my time than to write, second only to reading. As I write, sequential time alters. The usual clock face of seconds marching into minutes, and those minutes adding up to hours, fails to operate in that way for me. Time takes on elasticity and springiness. It seems to stretch so much that I lose track of those passing seconds. It seems to jump from its linear march so high and so far that one moment it is such and such a time, and the next an entire hour has elapsed.” —  Fred D’Aguiar, Year of Plagues: A Memoir of 2020 (Harper, August 3, 2021)
  • Post Title & Inspiration: Aldous Huxley: “It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.”

Comments

  1. So true. I’m off to do some reading.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Vincentdike says:

    Very nice

    Like

  3. Love ALL of this, the quotes, the pic, the idea; in fact , you’re describing my dream-life. One I now try to make real as much as possible. Less unnecessary tasks, more ‘fleeing’ in my reading world. That’s a mighty fine place to be, let me tell you.
    (Not so good for Hero Husband who’s not always pleased with his wife being ‘absent’ from this life.)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Some of my happiest childhood days were spent with my nose buried in a book. A Midwestern farm girl traveling the world from the safety of her room, interest piqued by the myriad experiences waiting for me beyond the edges of the cornfields that stretched for as far as my eye could see.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Reading is always transportive – yet, I am guilty of letting my mind wander to the dark side of worrying at times even when embraced by a great story line…

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Reading has saved me and continues to do so!

    Liked by 3 people

  7. yes, and the chapter of today is so fleetingly short-

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    And I love to read!! … “And so I close my book, draw the curtains and let the light in everything I’m supposed to do and let the chapter of today be enough.” — Juansen Dizon, “A Diary Entry about Reading” from The Boy Who Cries Wolf.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. We love to read as well and let everything else disappear in the background. We are just organizing a big bookfair for our village. We are happy to see how many booklovers are around here.
    Besides your text and quotes, we like the picture of the reader.
    Keep well
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • With you Klausbernd. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Klaus(bernd?) – I only wish I could whisk my beautifully kept, once-read, but sadly-no-longer-able-to-be-kept books to you and your village book fair…. HH brought some 400 to be burned in France when we relocated to our native Switzerland and I’ve some 350+ DVDs and another ca 200 books ready to be brought to England for nearly 3 years now, as we weren’t able to visit the UK any more….

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Kiki,
        I can well understand your grief of leaving your books behind. We suffered as well when we couldn’t bring our library from Montreal to Europe. We left several hundered books behind because it was too expensive to bring them all over. By the way, we lived in Switzerland, in St Gallen, as well before we decided living in England.
        Yes, my full first name is Klausbernd but most people call me Klaus.
        Keep well
        Klausbernd and the rest of
        The Fab Four of Cley
        🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  10. That little fire of anticipation in having a book waiting for later-you is delightful — and indeed, one may “live better in reality” after that flight.

    Liked by 2 people

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