I’m sorry, but…

sorry


Adapted From You Are Worth Saving

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Comments

  1. One of the most hurtful things in the world to me is someone not being able to say “I am really sorry” – and meaning it. No explanation, no rationalization, no excuses. Just truly knowing how to say “I am sorry”.

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  2. Don’t we hear those excuses all the time? Most of them translate into, “I’m not sorry and it was either your fault or it was beyond my control.”

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  3. I always hated that line from “Love Story” — “love means never having to say you’re sorry.”. I always thought that was hogwash (though maybe I just misunderstood). I’m with Mimi–it’s wicked important to be able to say those words when they need to be said.

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  4. Yes, this kind of “apology” makes my ass tired. And my butt is tired around most of the people I know.

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    • LMAO. “a** tired.” Never heard this line before. LOVED. That being said, I need some different perspectives (maybe some male ones). I’m getting carpet-bombed with female pov here. 🙂

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  5. Reblogged this on Simple.Interesting..

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  6. There must be lot of bushes on the Mars, that’s why they will beat around the bushes and can’t say a simple word…………

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  7. (whispering quietly) i’m with you dave…

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  8. “I’m sorry” seems to be the most difficult of words to say. I have no problem saying them if I truly have done something to hurt or wrong someone, especially someone that I love.

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    • I wish it could be so easy for me… 🙂

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      • Is it because you are still angry and hurt by something the other person did?

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        • 🙂 Like many things in life, it’s complicated and not black and white. 🙂

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          • I know the feeling. I had to find forgiveness toward someone who still has not said they are sorry back to me. In truth, I owed them an apology, but it would be nice if they could say the same thing back to me or even acknowledge my apology and accept it. But I can’t control anyone, but myself. So I will just be content that I said it and meant it. Then move on from there.

            Have a fabulous week, David. That’s my plan! 🙂

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  9. The best apology is followed with a sincere: “It won’t happen again.” Or the effort to make sure it does not. Crappy behavior is often “excused” with an apology when the offended party just doesn’t want a repeat of it. It takes energy to forgive nastiness.

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