Gate A-4

naomi_shihab_nye

Gate A-4 By Naomi Shihab Nye:

Wandering around the Albuquerque Airport Terminal, after learning my flight had been delayed four hours, I heard an announcement: “If anyone in the vicinity of Gate A-4 understands any Arabic, please come to the gate immediately.” Well— one pauses these days. Gate A-4 was my own gate. I went there.

An older woman in full traditional Palestinian embroidered dress, just like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing. “Help,” said the flight agent. “Talk to her . What is her problem? We told her the flight was going to be late and she did this.”

I stooped to put my arm around the woman and spoke haltingly. “Shu-dow-a, shu-bid-uck, habibti? Stani schway, min fadlick, shu-bit-se-wee?” The minute she heard any words she knew, however poorly used, she stopped crying. She thought the flight had been cancelled entirely. She needed to be in El Paso for major medical treatment the next day. I said, “No, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just late, who is picking you up? Let’s call him.”

We called her son, I spoke with him in English. I told him I would stay with his mother till we got on the plane. She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just for the fun of it. Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while in Arabic and found out of course they had ten shared friends. Then I thought just for the heck of it why not call some Palestinian poets I know and let them chat with her? This all took up two hours.

She was laughing a lot by then. Telling about her life, patting my knee, answering questions. She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool cookies— little powdered sugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and nuts— from her bag and was offering them to all the women at the gate. To my amazement, not a single traveler declined one. It was like a sacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the mom from California, the lovely woman from Laredo— we were all covered with the same powdered sugar. And smiling. There is no better cookie.

Then the airline broke out free apple juice and two little girls from our flight ran around serving it and they were covered with powdered sugar too. And I noticed my new best friend— by now we were holding hands— had a potted plant poking out of her bag, some medicinal thing, with green furry leaves. Such an old country traveling tradition. Always carry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.

And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and thought, This is the world I want to live in. The shared world. Not a single person in that gate— once the crying of confusion stopped— seemed apprehensive about any other person. They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women too.

This can still happen anywhere. Not everything is lost.


Notes:

 

Comments

  1. “always stay rooted somewhere” – and through such kindness, we do.

    Liked by 10 people

  2. Great story.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. i love this and cried throughout. kindness, compassion, understanding are all so contagious.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Thank you for this Sunday morning story…🙂 – J.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I love this poet and now I love *her*. That *is* the world I want to live in.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Fantastic story. Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Michael Zahaby says:

    Heart warming story

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Really great story. Showing love, being loved.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I LOVE Naomi Shihab Nye…you probably already know that. Thanks for this post. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. That was the best prayer I could imagine reading this Sunday morning. Lovely story. Humanity still exists. How sad we have to search for it.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. This story makes me so happy. I just love reading a happy story about strangers coming together for a brief snapshot of time, and everyone walking away from the moment enriched by the experience. Such a lovely contrappunto to all of the sad, angry news that we’re barraged with these days, particularly with respect to anything having to do with someone from the Middle East. There are many lovely souls from that part of the world, too. Unfortunately their voices and stories are all too often lost in the barrage . Loved. This. DK.

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Gorgeous share of beautiful souls and the light they share with us all♥
    Thank you for sharing and stay awesome, my friend🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. So lovely! Yes, there is definitely hope for us. I want one of those cookies too! And the quote about carrying a plant is so sweet🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I want to live in that world, I want to create that world.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. This. Yes. Not fear, not suspicion, but this.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Reblogged this on Makere's Blog and commented:
    This. Instead of fear, this.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. reblogged, David, thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Wonderful

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Reblogged this on mezzojan and commented:
    What a beautiful experience–just had to share this with my wonderful readers!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Wonderful! Reblogged at http://mezzojan.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

  21. You made this happen through kindness and love. May it be repaid to you a thousandfold.

    Thank you for your spirit.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Gorgeous. Love that story.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Having the desire of immersing ourselves in the culture of others will always generate the goodwill to bridge those cultural gaps. Learning other languages is the most direct, as well as just sharing what one does know, with no expectation of return. Hopefully we all will seize such opportunities when they come our way. As long as we can communicate, there is still hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Love this so much that I’m gong to share it on social media. I have a copy of Paul Loeb’s book, but have only read pieces of it, and not this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. this is the world i want to restore for humanity.
    may Allah give me the ability and capability.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Exquisiteness! Thank you for sharing this story.

    Like

  27. A most wonderful story … thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Reblogged this on WebMaster 1948.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Shukran, Habibti.😉
    LOL I was in Jeddah from age 9 to 14, can’t speak sentences but remember common phrases well. Ta’aili Hena! Shoufi! Yullah! Shwayuh (with all your fingertips together)
    Cheers.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Beautiful story.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Reblogged this on Marilyn Slagel and commented:
    A beautiful story…

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Kindness and generosity goes a long way. Thank you for sharing this story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, Bridget, it does. Your comment reminds me of:

      It’s a bit embarrassing to have been concerned with the human problem all one’s life and to find at the end that one has no more to offer by way of advice than ‘Try to be a little kinder.’

      — Aldous Huxley, quoted in The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama by Pico Iyer

      Liked by 1 person

  33. Reblogged this on Way off the grid and commented:
    Genuinely Beautiful …

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I am reminded, ” If everyone lit just one little candle, what a bright world this would be, ” and “Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me.”,

    Liked by 1 person

  35. offcenterproductions says:

    also would help if some of spoke more languages; great story!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Robin Casey says:

    Thank you for sharing this experience. A joy.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. I love this story.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Nice story, but obviously fiction. I don’t believe for a moment “This can happen anywhere.” 1) How did the woman get homemade cookies past security?
    2) I cannot imagine any airline giving free apple juice because a flight was delayed.

    Like

  39. Jane Marie says:

    I will be researching a recipe for those cookies and making them for Christmas! I wonder what the plant was–I’m sure it could replace something really expensive sold by our friends at big pharma…

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Yes – that is the world many of us want and believe we can have and then terrorists kill men praying in Jerusalem, and the dream comes to a crashing halt.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. marjorierommel says:

    None of this could have happened if that Palestinian lady hadn’t been willing to let her emotions show! Would we? Probably not. We pull a stiff upper lip and maybe sniffle into a tissue, but there’s darned little open sharing of emotion here — we think of tears, distress, as signals of weakness and vulnerability. I think most of us would respond to this lady, or to anyone clearly in such dire straits, regardless of our ability to communicate verbally, but we so seldom trust one another enough to signal distress. Trust and response — a two-ended rope!

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Absolutely beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Carol Brown says:

    What a wonderful story from a wonderful person.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Kathy Napolitano says:

    Perfect response. I’m so glad you are such a kind person. the world needs more kindness.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Reblogged this on Song and dance mom. and commented:
    This made my day.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. A moment of heaven, made and shared.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. Naomi is a poet, but her prose is poetry itself–easy to read–easy to visualize–evocative. She should write more of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. So lovely to read this – this blog post was shared by a friend of mine in Nova Scotia to me in the Isle of Man! I look forward to reading more posts on your page.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. A story that makes your heart smile.

    Liked by 1 person

  50. Such things are so important in the world! Thank you for doing it,and sharing the story. Not everything is lost!

    Liked by 1 person

  51. thank you. both you and naomi, david. deeply appreciate these words tonight.

    Liked by 1 person

  52. An incredibly moving story. Thanks so much for sharing it.

    Liked by 1 person

  53. Reblogged this on Nebraska Medium Amy Akers and commented:
    enlightening, human kindness, natural love of being good to others!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  54. Linda DeVona says:

    What a wonderful story! Reminds me of an unexpected delay (well over 4 hours) in Philadelphia due to thunderstorms and mechanical problems… Soon enough a group of passengers began talking and more and more joined in; by the time we boarded, we seemed like a party of friends. We all knew everyone’s stories…one woman was headed to a surprise birthday party, one young man was due at a wedding, my young son and I were returning home from visiting my daughter in Denver, another gal was visiting her cousin not far from us in upstate NY….

    Liked by 2 people

  55. Jennifer Johnston Crow says:

    Reblogged this on 365 Grateful and commented:
    Nice, nice, message here.

    Liked by 1 person

  56. Just the kind of world I want to be in. We are not single people, we are a community. Loveliest thing I have read in some time.

    Liked by 2 people

  57. thank you so much for this lovely, heartwarming and soul-lifting story. How wonderful that this Palestinian woman saw that here, too, we can extend the kind of hospitality so treasured in the Middle Eastern cultures.

    Liked by 1 person

  58. Reblogged this on Kevin Brooks and commented:
    Wonderful story; wish I had gone to hear Nye speak.

    Liked by 1 person

  59. What a beautiful, inspiring encounter that affected not just the two individuals involved but everyone else in that gate area. What IS the magic word to break down confusion and distance between total strangers?

    Liked by 1 person

  60. is it a true story?

    Like

  61. Thank you for making my day!

    Like

  62. What a wonderful story! Thanks for sharing it.

    Like

  63. A wonderful story! If only…

    Liked by 1 person

  64. I wish I read more stories like this. Thank you for sharing it. Simply beautiful.

    Like

  65. what a wonderful uplifting story.
    We do care about each other, and wish we have no politicians on this earth to spoil our happiness. Though we are different in many ways, we are so similar in million ways.
    Thanks,
    Wahiba

    Like

  66. Great story, very pleasant, vivid, and inspiring.

    Like

  67. Great story, vivid, pleasant, and inspiring.🙂
    Vee

    Like

  68. Thanks – but it takes all of us that have read your story to slam it into our hearts, souls, and brains – this can be our world but WE ALL HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE IT HAPPEN. It is not easy. It won’t be easy. BUT it feels so good. Random acts of kindness (or whatever the phrase you like to use). It begins with YOU!

    Like

    • Yes, Craig, it does start with each of us…reminds me of Margaret Mead’s quote:

      “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
      ― Margaret Mead

      Like

  69. When love shows up beautiful things like this happen!

    Like

  70. I hope all these phone calls were on the airline’s dime lol! Seriously though, thank you for reminding us of the gifts of connecting with each other.

    Like

  71. wow…..in the big since of this word. To know you mattered so much, at that moment, to someone who was then a stranger and now a part of us all us, has no word. WOW

    Like

  72. This was what I needed to read tonight. This is what I always believed we were when I traveled to Turkey and experienced such acceptance as a 6ft. blonde haired female holding hands and laughing with tiny wonderful women and men, eating their homemade treats by the side of the road. That was in 1983, August. I will never forget .

    Like

  73. Always the lovely and beautiful Naomi Shihab Nye. Thank you for sharing. She taught me poetry when I was in elementary school. A vision of color and light 35 years past. She’s vibrates still.

    Like

  74. Beautiful. Poignant. Communion can happen anywhere. And hope blossoms too.

    Like

  75. Thank you. This is gorgeous.

    Like

  76. This is Albuquerque. Thank you Naomi for your generosity and thank you Albuquerque for your amazing people. I love my adopted city.

    Like

  77. kwaayesnama says:

    This story made me cry – how much better this world would be if we shared cookies instead of bullets.
    Thank you for sharing

    Like

  78. Fontaine Maverick says:

    This made my night. Just wonderful. This gracious woman spoke at my uncles funeral in 2003. At his request, she read “The Mustangs” by J. Frank Dobie.

    Like

  79. Deborah Hattimer says:

    I love this story…….

    Like

  80. Thank you. I needed to read this today. I will be sharing on my networks. Indeed what a world we COULD have. It’s a shame we don’t experience more of this daily.

    Like

  81. Reblogged this on uglyarchives.

    Like

  82. How wonderful…yes there are those special moments when all is well. Thank you

    Like

  83. Donna Cano says:

    if kindness is your king

    Like

  84. Phoenix033 says:

    What a beautiful experience. Good of your honoring of life here. Life can be beautiful, all ya gotta do it believe. Thanks for the cry and thanks for sharing🙂❤

    Like

  85. Beverly Hollenbeck says:

    This made me cry. In a good way. Thank you, David and Naomi. The world needed this today.

    Like

  86. Thubten Tsering says:

    I want a world where there is no discrimination and no prejudice.
    All must learn to live like one family.

    Like

  87. Trish MLDB says:

    Beautiful.

    Like

  88. you are a beautiful writer. NEVER stop. Never.

    Like

  89. This soothed my troubled heart tonight. Thank you.

    Like

  90. Laureene Reeves Ndagire says:

    Reblogged this on “Remember that wherever your heart is, there you will find your treasure.” and commented:
    What a positive story…This is the world i want to live in and bring up my children, one where people are patient with one another and willing to overcome barriers of language, color and age..

    Liked by 1 person

  91. I’ll be saving this post and hope you and your readers will consider contributing to our upcoming Hurt Society Blog Carnival Call: ePatient Travel Edition at http://afternoonnapsociety.blogspot.com/2014/11/hurt-society-blog-carnival-call.html.

    Like

  92. Thank you for this inspirational blog as I prepare to travel once more. Reaching out spontaneously to someone in need holds priceless reward.

    Like

  93. What a beautiful story … great way to start my day. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  94. Heaven on Earth!

    Like

  95. As a global traveler, I experience this kind of lovely connection everywhere, not as often as one might expect but just wonderful. What a well-written piece. You should submit it to the ABQ Journal, or the NY Times. Seriously, well written!!

    Like

  96. “…passed like sacrament…” What a beautiful image. I want to live in the world of Gate A4.

    I’m a baker and I pass out cupcakes…and for that moment, a conversation is spontaneous.

    Like

  97. Thanks for spreading hope. Grateful for your words today.

    Like

  98. Reblogged this on oceangirlontheouterbanks and commented:
    A beautiful story ..

    Like

  99. Reblogged this on Bringing Clair-ity To Life Down Under and commented:
    Wonderful…just wonderful.

    Like

  100. beautiful.

    Like

  101. Beautiful. All is not lost. Thank you for sharing this.

    Like

  102. I can’t recall the last time I was this happy to be tearful. Thank you.

    Like

  103. Simple and beautiful. This happens far more often than the bleak world we are bombarded with images of. Thanks for sharing. I’m leaving the house with a smile today.

    Like

  104. Great story!! Thank you! Regarding the plant and cookies…

    Like

    • It is Laura. It is.

      Like

      • Anthony J Cooke says:

        It has amazed me how many people have been touched by this story. We all have this warm side to us, we just don’t stand still enough to use it. We come into this world with nothing and leave the same way. Why do we hold on to something that will never be ours even if we live to be one hundred. Thank for this uplifting story. Anthony Cooke B.C. Canada.

        Like

        • Hi Anthony. Your amazement is shared. Like that human wave that rolls around a football stadium or hockey rink, I was awed by the humanity that surfaced with this shared. I sat and watched the comments flood in. All so inspiring. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. I agree with your view. Dave

          Like

  105. I believe that these magical moments serve to mend and heal humanity at a deep level, erasing the differences and the distance that we have created between us, allowing us to see and know that we are truly One. We may think these moments are fleeting and that they pass and are forgotten, but I believe the memory stays within us and shifts each of us and those we come into contact with afterwards. So the moment keeps on giving. Thank you for sharing this beautifully moving and inspiring story of Love and Truth in action. Namaste.

    Like

  106. This is the kind of story I would like to think our world could be wrapped in, especially the USA and the area in which I live. The joy that diversity and understanding diversity can bring is often times hard to detail. Your words, Naomi Shahib Nye (whose words I have read for years), gave us a clear picture of how it could be. This is a story I will treasure and share many times.

    Like

  107. Great post! Well written and I could relate to every word….even checking my shirt for a bit of powdered sugar.

    Like

  108. Thanks for this! Shared with friends. “This can still happen anywhere. Not everything is lost.” So powerful.

    Like

  109. Reblogged this on Jane Arie Baldwin and commented:
    My mother introduced me to the work of Naomi Shihab Nye. She is now one of my favorite poets. The picture she paints in this story is how I want to live in the world — to embody it, to connect with everyone around me so that we can be rooted together.

    Like

  110. This is the world we could live in if people, including me, were more open and less affraid. Thanks’ for the reminder.

    Like

  111. Janie Reinart says:

    Love Naomi! Had the chance to meet her in connection with the Silver Apples of the Moon Art and Poetry contest in Shaker Heights, Ohio with the library and Cleveland Art Museum, back in 2006.

    Like

  112. Reblogged this on Shaman Elizabeth Herrera Blog.

    Like

  113. Beautiful Story:) Thank you for sharing. KINDNESS ALL AROUND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

  114. I often have experiences like this in the airport. Before I leave for the airport I always say, “I am open to all magic and miracles.” Here’s one of my airport miracles.

    http://taraleighlovesyou.com/shifthappens.html

    Like

  115. Reblogged this on it'saboutthestory and commented:
    This is a lovely human story: posted by David Kanigan, by Naoim Shihab Nye who also wrote the poem Kindness, which you can read at http://www.elise.com/q/poetry/naomi.htm. After reading this, I think I’ll always take a plant with me wherever I go:-)

    Like

  116. Devorah Rosenberg says:

    Thank you. When 9/11 happened, I lived in a town with 2 Jewish Day schools and one Muslim school. I called the Muslim one and apologized for the acts of non Muslims in my town who were talking trash and boycotting Arab businesses. And I asked if they would like to have the kids from our respective schools, Jewish kids and Muslim kids have a day together. We all said yes. We are all people. Peace be with you

    Like

  117. Ah, what a wonderful story. That is the kind of world I want to live in, too. I do wish people would realize how they can beautify the world with simple actions.

    Like

  118. thank you… t

    Like

  119. Karin Peirce says:

    Wonderful…

    Like

  120. Such a moving story – thank you for sharing

    Like

  121. Bill Chambers says:

    What a story! I took a month-long Amtrak trip in September, partly to see if there were still some decent, honorable people in this world. There were two on one train who were not, but by and large, Isome totally magnificent people crossed my path. Those wonderful people showed me that there is still some hope for decency and honor in this world.

    Like

  122. thinkerfromiowa says:

    What a story! I took a month-long Amtrak trip in September, partly to see if there were still some good, decent people in this world. There were two on one train who weren’t, but by and large, many magnificent people crossed my path. It is because of these wonderful people I got to meet that I still hold hope that there is still decency and honor in this country and this world.

    Like

  123. This is marvelous, thank you very much. Every once in a while I run across something that resonates so strongly, i print it out and hang it up in more than one place around the house so I end up reading it daily. This is the longest piece I’ve ever done that with but it’s definitely as worthy if not more so than anything else I’ve hung on the mirror and doors previously.

    Like

  124. Thank you for sharing this. We so need to see great stories like this. Nothing epic, just every day kindness and generosity of spirit.

    Like

  125. I love the fact that Ms. Nye presents this as an experience that she took part in not one that she initiated or directed. This is a modern ‘Stone Soup’ if you know that story. I get almost as much from the telling and sharing of this story as I would have by being there. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

    Like

  126. These types of stories need to make the front page. A nation that moves independently in the same direction is less effective that one that moves together as one.

    Like

  127. Beautiful. Shared.

    Like

  128. Wonderful, I was there briefly with sugar on my lips…

    Like

  129. This article made my heart JUMP with hope and excitement. Thank you. These are the types of stories that should be on the news! Love it! Thank you, again.

    Like

  130. How very lovely. I believe that the Lord places you where you need to be and when you respond to someone elses needs you are fulfilling your own. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

  131. Floyd Henderson says:

    Thanks for sharing that, I feel the same way about being the world I want to live in.

    Like

  132. Lovely. And rare.

    Like

  133. Awesome. Thank you for this.

    Like

  134. Imagine all the people living life in peace…. O-O

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  135. Story telling at its best. Powdered sugar and everything in between.

    Like

  136. That was lovely…thank you so much x

    Like

  137. This is beautiful. Thank you!

    Like

  138. What a beautiful story! Thank goodness there are moments like this! Thank you for your kindness in helping that woman. She will be talking about the “wonderful time at the airport” for the rest of her life. This made me and so many other readers smile. Just beautiful!

    Like

  139. Tom Edwards says:

    Hi, Naomi,
    This is the world as it always has been! People are loving and kind, despite what one reads or watches. Kindness is not co-opted or used for propaganda, and does not have a political agenda, as fear-mongers would have us believe. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  140. Beautiful. It’s the world in which I too wish to live.

    Like

  141. Beautiful story! I must read more of your writing!!!

    Like

  142. Daniel Nye says:

    We can (not be afraid to) ‘make it happen’!

    Like

  143. Elizabeth Ann Speed says:

    David thanks for posting this here. It all worked wonderfully because Naomi and this lady as well as the others connected at the personal level and they knew they valued each other as people who they cared enough about to help out. Naomi didn’t just help this lady get through this situation but brought something special to her own self and well-being as well as to the other folks around. We need to do this everyday in our dealings with others. Sometimes just a smile when another is down can brighten up their day and make a positive change for them.

    Like

  144. Wonderful Thank you. I shared it on facebook with this comment: “I you’d like something BEAUTIFUL to cry about, this will do it!”

    Like

  145. Cracked my heart right open. Needed it. Miss my Nonna. Food = Love.

    Like

  146. I love moments like these. What a wonderful moment for you, and for the folks who experienced it with you. Thank you for the reminder of my own special moments in time, those rare but special connections with strangers where anything seems possible and all people, for one moment, are beautiful.

    Like

  147. Beautiful!

    Like

  148. This is beautiful. I am verklempt. Thank you!

    Like

  149. Reblogged this on Shamsidancing.

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  150. A little kindness…and look what happened! I hope this inspires everyone who reads it to go out there and make a *little* difference…You never know where it might go!

    Aloha!

    Like

  151. This is a real human story! Thank you for sharing it!

    Like

  152. Mamool! They really are the best cookie…

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  153. Beautiful story. Thank you for taking the time to change the moment for one stranger and making the world a brighter place.

    Liked by 1 person

  154. Restores my faith in humanity – I was beginning to wonder……! Beautiful story! Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

  155. Thank you. Tears in my eyes. Such compassion and sharing. Whenever my elderly mother travels at Christmas to visit, I would always hope that there would be one traveler who would show her such compassion if she were in need without one of us with her. I know this is a story about much more than that, but that is how I envisioned it.

    Like

  156. I’ve always relied on the kindness of stranger!!

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  157. No, not everything is lost. This post, these words, a precious map back to feeling and hoping.

    Like

  158. One of the most beautiful stories I’ve read in a long time – this says it all about the truth that we are all connected. Thank you.

    Like

  159. mike hickey says:

    This is the light that Naomi Nye shines wherever she goes! I’ve met her at some poetry conferences and taught her poems for years. We even exchanged letters once. She is one of those artists who is as a genuine and compassionate as a person as she is talented. One of my all-time favorite carbon-based life forms! 🙂

    Like

    • Mike, I wish I could have the opportunity to listen to hear in a poetry reading. Would be a wonderful experience. Thanks for sharing. You’ve inspired me to drop her a line given the explosion of shares that her work has received in this post. I will do so this weekend. Thanks for the inspiration.

      Like

  160. And it DOES happen everywhere, everyday! Stop watching the typical news and your faith in humanity will remain restored!

    Liked by 1 person

  161. Ruth Rogge says:

    As the song says, “All you need is love!” Shared and thanks!

    Like

  162. Thank you! Such a beautiful and heart warming story. More stories like this should be shared. Let us all be covered in powdered sugar!

    Like

  163. When my boys were 4 and 1 we got delayed at Atlanta airport on the way back from Florida. I had planned the flight around the younger one’s naptime, so…as I was trying to corral the 4 year old, comfort the sobbing 1 year old and call my husband about the delay, a lovely older woman quietly came up and took the 1 year in her arms. Within 20 minutes all of the families had banned together to take turns comforting, playing with, and feeding the little ones. By the time the flight was called we knew everything we needed to know about each other, and parted good friends, even thought we knew we’d never see each other again.

    Liked by 2 people

  164. Wonderful. I needed to read this today.

    Like

  165. This is the world I want to live in. The shared world. Not a single person in that gate— once the crying of confusion stopped— seemed apprehensive about any other person.

    Inasmuch as the citizens of the Gaza Strip elected Hamas to represent them, and a couple of days ago some Palestinians murdered five Jews in a synagogue in Jerusalem, it’s stunning to read a Palestinian offering this view.

    Like

  166. Made me good-cry. Look at all the people responding to this tale of kindness…let’s all make this our world, one little old human at a time.

    Liked by 1 person

  167. Longing for civility regained says:

    Thank you for such a calm, beautiful, powerful reminder that it IS that simple and we each hold the power. I, too, wish to live in this world. If we each do a little, each day, I believe we can.

    Like

  168. Margery Erp says:

    Naomi, you are such a treasure…to us in San Antonio, and to the world. Trinity, 1975

    Like

  169. Gilles Shooner says:

    Its a kind of relation similar to that one between Le petit Prince with the Desert Fox . You can never forget a such event in your life .You are now unique for each other . That is greatly lovable .Bravo !

    Like

  170. I’ve treasured a little booklet of poems, “Wrapping the Grapeleaves,” for years because of Naomi Shihab Nye’s poem, “Grandfather’s Heaven.” Don’t stop writing -ever!!! You have so much to share.

    Like

  171. Loved it, thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  172. Reblogged this on An Average Girl's Blog and commented:
    Powerful stuff.

    Like

  173. Naomi, what a wonderful story! Thank you so very much for sharing it.

    Like

  174. Awesome story ! It gave me hope in humanity ! 😊😊😊😊

    Like

  175. Hisham Abad says:

    رأيتك أمس في الميناء

    مسافرة بلا أهل .. بلا زاد

    ركضت إليك كالأيتام،

    أسأل حكمة الأجداد :

    لماذا تسحب البيّارة الخضراء

    إلى سجن، إلى منفى، إلى ميناء

    و تبقى رغم رحلتها

    و رغم روائح الأملاح و الأشواق ،

    تبقى دائما خضراء؟

    وأنت كنخلة في الذهن ما انكسرت لعاصفة وحطاب،

    وما جزت ضفائرها

    وحوش البيد والغاب

    فلسطينية العينين والوشم

    ….

    Like

    • Hi Hisham. I can’t read/understand the language (sorry). I tried Google Translate but I’m not sure it captured the message. If you could translate to English, I would appreciate it. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hisham Abad says:

        Sorry for posting without a translation. The words are taken from Mahmoud Darwish’s poem “A lover from Palstine.” Here is the translation for the above copied from the site at the link below:

        I saw you last at the port
        A lonely traveler without luggage
        I ran to you like an orphan, a child
        Seeking answers in ancestral wisdom:
        How could the green orchard be imprisoned
        Exiled, banished to a port
        And still remain green

        ….

        And you like the braided palm tree
        Unbending to the storm
        Heedless of the hewer’s blows
        Beyond the claw and the fangs of the jungle beasts

        ….

        Palestinian are your eyes
        Palestinian is your name
        Palestinian your thoughts-dreams
        Palestinian your mantilla, your body
        Your feet

        http://www.jehat.com/Jehaat/en/Poets/MahmoudDarwish1.htm

        ..

        Like

  176. Thank you for this.

    Like

  177. I heard her recite some of her poetry at the Jonesboro Storytelling Festival in about 1997 in Tennessee when I was there in college. I loved her work so much that I bought The Tree Is Older Than You Are at the festival. I want to live like this: looking for loveliness.

    Like

  178. #Nostalgia… I first met Naomi in 1985 when she & her husband Michael & then-baby/now-adult son Madison & I were all living at the same center Na Bolom in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico. We spent a few wonderful months hanging out (while I was also working with refugee and human rights groups there over a 5 year period). My favorite poem that she wrote during that time was this one:
    ————————————
    KINDNESS:

    Before you know what kindness really is
    you must lose things,
    feel the future dissolve in a moment
    like salt in a weakened broth.
    What you held in your hand,
    all this must go so you know
    how desolate the landscape can be
    between the regions of kindness.
    How you ride and ride
    thinking the bus will never stop,
    the passengers eating maize and chicken
    will stare out the window forever.

    Before you learn the tender gravity of kindness,
    you must travel where the Indian in a white poncho
    lies dead by the side of the road.
    You must see how this could be you,
    how he too was someone
    who journeyed through the night with plans
    and the simple breath that kept him alive.

    Before you know kindness as the deepest thing inside,
    you must know sorrow as the other deepest thing.
    You must wake up with sorrow.
    You must speak it till your voice
    catches the thread of all sorrows
    and you see the size of the cloth.

    Then it is only kindness that makes sense anymore,
    only kindness that ties your shoes
    and sends you out into the day to mail letters and
    purchase bread,
    only kindness that raises its head
    from the crowd of the world to say
    It is I you have been looking for,
    and then goes with you everywhere
    like a shadow or a friend.

    -Naomi Shihab Nye

    (from her book of poetry “Words Under the Words”)
    —————————————————————-

    Like

  179. Lovely story! Thank you!

    Like

  180. Reblogged this on The Metta Garden and commented:
    THIS…

    Liked by 1 person

  181. Joel Peralto says:

    Sounds a lot like Aloha!!!

    Like

  182. Beautiful. Thank You for everything. Peace be with you all.

    Like

  183. I love mamoo cookies. Just had few , twice, at my Palestinian neighbors. Lovely story. “Not all is lost” for sure🙂

    Like

  184. thank you … you put a smile on our faces .. and poked our human side ..

    Like

  185. Reblogged this on 101 Ways to Make Friends and commented:
    a beautiful story, shared by Faith Bodnar of Inclusion B.C.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for sharing Aaron

      Like

    • Kevin flood says:

      I met Naomi when she did a poetry workshop at Ray high school in 1977. I wrote a little poem that day, something like this: “home is where the heart is, they say, but a house is not a home. I knew a man with a thousand homes, and I knew a man with none. The latter was a rich old miser, and the former was a bum.”
      Two years ago my now thirteen year old daughter started studying Arabic. Now her twin brother studies Arabic also. I really never knew why they were learning Arabic, but I guess now I do!
      Thanks Naomi.

      Like

  186. Thank you for sharing this wonderful story. You made my day.

    Like

  187. Thank you, Naomi. What a GREAT ARTICLE and your real life as a WONDERFUL HUMAN.

    Like

  188. Reblogged this on Global&Co.

    Liked by 1 person

  189. I love kindness and compassion, the touching of one heart to another. Thank you for this beautiful, inspiring true story! Let us continue to carry forth the light of “Random Acts of Kindness”!

    Like

  190. I am in love with this story. It is frakking awesome and so are you for telling it, and making my day in the process. I’m reminded of those youtube videos from Russia called “the video that made the whole world cry” or something like that, each of them six or seven minutes of clips of people helping other people in random public crises as minor as crossing the street to life-threatening floods and car accidents. Why we don’t all live our lives this way every day is even more baffling to me than Fox News.

    Like

  191. Reblogged this on Old Road Apples and commented:
    if you read one post today, read this one. I am in love with this story. It is awesome and so is the writer for telling it, and making my day in the process. I’m reminded of those youtube videos from Russia called “the video that made the whole world cry” or something like that, each of them six or seven minutes of clips of people helping other people in random public crises as minor as crossing the street to life-threatening floods and car accidents. Why we don’t all live our lives this way every day is even more baffling to me than Fox News.

    Like

  192. Reminds us that we are all human – and that we create memories when they are least expected.

    Like

  193. After watching an hour of doom and gloom from CNN, this just made my day and my eyes leak some🙂. Tanks for sharing this wonderful story

    Like

  194. Robin Bowman says:

    Awesome, awesome story. So much heart, so much love.

    Like

  195. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing. There is hope in the world.

    Like

  196. I know the ABQ airport really well, and oddly enough, this unlikely scenario anywhere else seems to be not at all surprising there. I know that probably the finest, most generous man I’ve ever known was a Palestinian man who lived in Gallup, NM. I’ve known his entire family well and used to received Eid treat platters from them in the mail. The blend of cultures is a New Mexico tradition several thousand years old. Adding diverse Europeans to the mix was not much of a stretch for that place at all.

    Like

  197. Mark Slider says:

    Thank you! : )

    Like

  198. Reblogged this on Catharine Cooper and commented:
    Yes .. the kind of world I want to live in as well …

    Like

  199. this is such a nice story. hope lots of people will read it and it dispels some of the paranoia and mistrust. thanks for sharing

    Like

  200. Monterey Anthony says:

    This is one of those beautiful gifts from living a life of being open to caring. You spread joy on that day, and they all gave it back to you.

    Like

  201. Penny Walker Bos says:

    Your story made my heart smile! Have a blue sky day!

    Liked by 1 person

  202. Karen Thompson says:

    Thanks Jane, I wonder if I will stop crying some time today.

    Like

  203. A really heartwarming story, David.

    Liked by 2 people

  204. I’m embarrassed to admit I’d have had to call my father to act as a translator. On the plus side, he used to do that professionally and would get a kick out of it.

    He’d also figure out, in the first five minutes, how we’re related.

    (And as it happens, I have mamool just outside my office and a cup of coffee in front of me. Time for them to get together, I think.)

    Liked by 1 person

  205. I was working in a hospital pharmacy years ago when someone came around looking for anyone who knew any French. I’d studied for 4 years, so I joined a pharmacy tech and a few other people in trying to help a Haitian man with a stomach ache. We were given a list of questions to ask and stumbled our way through most; enough to learn what he’d eaten the day before, which led to an easy diagnosis. As we were leaving, I suddenly realized why he looked so confused when we asked, over and over, what we thought was “Have you taken any medicine?” Instead, we’d repeated, “Have you taken a doctor?” I’m glad others’ experiences have been easier than ours was! I’m also glad I haven’t been called upon to communicate in French since then.

    Like

  206. wtpfefferle says:

    The photo of Nye was taken by WT Pfefferle in San Antonio in 2003.

    Like

  207. This is a beautiful story, the power of language, the art of making time.

    Liked by 1 person

  208. Tearing up, in a good way. Thank you.

    Like

  209. I met a an interesting man named Joe on a flight between Alaska & Portland. This is the post I shared with my friends on Facebook.

    June 20, 2014
    Facebook post
    June 20, 2014

    Portland. Pooped. Leaving Alaska is always so hard emotionally and physically. Had a very nice man named Joe as my aisle mate. I knew right away that he was going to be chatty and I sort if dreaded it since I only wanted to sleep. Something told me to listen to him, that he needed to talk, so after he asked me where I was going and then why I am in Alaska I followed up with… “And you?” I learned so much about this guy in the time it takes to board a plane. He is from Nashville with a polite accent and follows his sentences with hun, and your kindly welcome, born in 48, was in Vietnam, two plane crashes, helped build phone systems in here in Alaska, retired military 20 years ( ex marine) had an injury that now requires him to walk with a cane ( which he seemed self conscious about), was an alcoholic that taught himself to make beautiful leather crafts that he now sells to keep himself out of trouble, that he refuses to turn into a business because of taxes, he had a son die of cancer when he was 19. He talked about his son a lot, as if he died yesterday. Said, I was in war and saw horrific things, but nothing compares to that. I listened. When he opened his phone the first time to show me pictures of the fish he caught,I asked his son in my heart to please not let this go on the whole flight. When he opened his phone again to show me examples of his leather work ( although beautiful) I asked God to please not let there be a third time. When the flight crew said the plane was full but no one sat in the middle seat between us, I imagined Joe’s son getting comfortable in that seat, with a boy’s smile saying, “that’s my dad. Isn’t he amazing? I love to hear his stories.”

    Liked by 1 person

  210. If we are all open to the present moment and act with an open heart filled with love. We can reach out. Simple as that! We can share, feel the energy flowing, and feel life, joy, love! The world needs more of those open, courageous people, who look beyond the surface and feel what is really needed.

    Thanks for sharing this beautiful story!🙂

    Like

  211. caitlinfitzpatrickcurley says:

    This is a beautiful story, the type of story you wish you could read more often. Thank you for writing. I will be sharing on my page.

    Liked by 1 person

  212. Amy Patton Grammer says:

    Oh Naomi, your sweet spirit makes the world a better place! Thank you for visiting my school back in the 1970’s as our poet in residence. You touched many young lives and clearly continue to do so! I sang “Rutabaga Roo” for my kids years ago in an attempt to get them to eat a lovely soup that included rutabagas. They did not like my soup, but we had a great time singing about it!
    ❤️ Amy Patton

    Like

  213. helena mallett says:

    Fabulous. Wonderful. Brought tears to my eyes …

    Like

  214. Reblogged this on sudanisms.

    Like

  215. How lovely! May we all learn to “take the cookies”!

    Like

  216. What a wonderful post. It brought tears to my eyes. Thank YOU for bringing some kindness of humanity back to a day when there is so much evidence that we need it.

    Like

  217. If all Palestinians behaved like this old lady then I’m sure Israel would leave them in peace.

    Like

  218. This is a beautiful story, thank you for sharing it. I love her work!

    Like

  219. Beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  220. That’s an absolutely cracking story. I love that she knew friends of your dad too. Lovely stuff.

    Cheers

    MTM

    Like

  221. Best thing I’ve read online today. Thank you!

    Like

  222. Thank you for bringing this story to us in such a wonderfully told manner. It’s beautiful. The message is universal and significant.

    Like

  223. Reblogged this on HonieBriggs and commented:
    “This is the world I want to live in. The shared world.”
    Me too, Naomi. Me too.

    Like

  224. Beautiful story. I always believed that the two things that bring people closer together are: crisis… and cookies. The world doesn’t need another war. It needs cookies. Powdery sugar just makes it that much better.

    Like

  225. Naomi: You are an angel … It’s not easy for older people to travel, especially alone. I must say she was a brave soul to make that Journey on her own… Keep on doing what you do… you made a difference in so many peoples world that day…

    Like

  226. I will share this with my students.

    Like

  227. Thank you for sharing such a beautiful story.

    Like

  228. Keri Dominguez says:

    thank you

    Like

  229. I’m happy to find you David, and I’m grateful you posted this wonderful story! I posted it on my personal and work FB pages. On my work page, I asked people to find the preparedness lessons, because several are in this beautiful story. It’s posted at http://www.Facebook.com/CARDcanhelp. This story made my day. Hats off to you for sharing it with us all.

    Like

  230. Jean Kapolnek says:

    A lovely story!!!!!

    Like

  231. And men think women are powerless! HA!

    Like

  232. What a wonderful story. Brought back a memory of something my mother once did. Returning from a trip she met a woman from Papua New Guinea who was stranded at the Toronto airport as her flight had been delayed until the next day. She had nowhere to go for the night. So my mother brought this lady back to her home for the night! Two strangers trusting each other.

    Like

  233. I’m all smiles right now!! At the right place and the right time. Just wonderful.
    For those who want to try Mamul, you can place an order online for the best Mamul ever at http://www.zalatimosweets.com

    In 1860, Mohammad Zalatimo opened a small pastry shop in the old city of Jerusalem, within the ancient walls surrounding the roman built church of the Holy Sepulchre. And since 1860 Zalatimo Sweets, family owned and operated produced consistently while keeping in focus the original, fresh hand-made taste that Zalatimo Sweets Company is known for and has offered for over 150 years.

    Like

  234. Reblogged this on Awake in Los Angeles.

    Like

  235. Smiling, David… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  236. Reblogged this on Elizabeth Nicholas.

    Like

  237. Anita Hovey says:

    This gives me hope for humanity!Thank you.

    Like

  238. Such a lovely story, thank you for sharing!

    Like

  239. I think you should submit this story to Travelers Tales, or some other type of anthology. It’s heartwarming, well written and has a great narrative arc. Loved the bit about the plant, and being rooted. Well done.

    Like

  240. Reblogged this on Myra H. Mcilvain.

    Like

  241. If we could just take the politics, politicians and greed out of the world, we would have this. Forget what country you are from and see people for who they are. Not what they are.

    Like

  242. Tonya McKinny says:

    Beautiful. We travel a lot, like 8-10 times a year as a family for work and always talk about the travel angels we will see or maybe be for someone else when we travel. Sounds like you were a wonderful travel angel that day. Thank you for inspiring story.

    Like

  243. Is this a true story of something that happened to Naomi Shihab Nye, or is it a fictional short story she wrote for a book in which it appears? Sure, it could be true, but her occupation is writing poetry and fiction. I’ve come across so many touching stories like this one, so eloquently written — only to be disappointed when I found out that they were fiction by an eloquent writer. I’d like to believe this is true. Can someone confirm?

    Like

  244. Beautiful story, Naomi. I agree – this is the world I want to live in, too. You let your light shine and made it so.🙂

    Like

  245. This story reminded me of how important it is to be able and willing
    to listen carefully and provide assistance when and however we can. Kindness is never wasted!

    Like

  246. thissystemisbroken2013 says:

    Reblogged this on This System is Broken and commented:
    This moved me deeply. Not only because I have Arab friends, and not only because I have recently suffered racism myself, but because it could have played out so differently. It brings to mind the heartbreaking Robert Dziekanski incident on October 2007 in Vancouver airport. A tragedy that would never have happened if people were not so quick to judge.

    Like

  247. I’m on the vestry (like a board) of an Episcopal church in southern New Jersey and at the end of each meeting our priest asks us to share a ‘God moment’ from the past month. A time when you have experienced God in your like. I’d say that this was a God moment (however you and the others there interpret a god). Peace.

    Like

  248. Thank you for sharing this story. It bought tears to my eyes- happy to know the beauty out there tears.

    Like

  249. Beautiful. Thank you for this really inspiring story. Yeah, we all just need actual, emotional connection. It would heal our world, and this toxic, sociopathic Western culture we’re all suffering under, which is based on screw the other person over, and very cold in its tone. It’s a great thing you did. Thank you.

    Like

  250. Thank you for that. I have tears in my eyes. There is still hope, isn’t there?

    Like

  251. Annie Clark says:

    I always go to the airport with the intention of making new friends. That means, usually, helping someone. But, that’s okay, because then I’ve done something good & it helped the time go by & then I have the story for the rest of my life.
    This paid off best when my son was only 4 (over two decades ago- WOW!) & we went on a trip to Atlanta. I packed many snacks for him, so as to perhaps be able to keep him occupied & not bother the other passengers. I made about 3 times as much as I thought I would need, but figured: Better Safe than Sorry!
    Well, at what was supposed to be a short stop-over, we became delayed by many hours. Snack bars closed, people got hungry & cranky. The folks that had already been pleasant to myself & my child were gifted apple slices, quarters of PB&J sandwiches, crackers & raisins. We shared stories over our picnic & made friends. We got excited with the young woman who was going to see her fiancee after a long separation, & looked at photos of people’s grand kids. We sang children’s songs to my son.
    When we finally arrived in Atlanta, the last train was being called…if I missed it, I would have to, somehow, carry my now sleeping & heavy kid & all our carry-on luggage for MILES! BUT, my crew sprang into action! They practically mugged an airport worker with one of those golf cart-thingies & convinced him that he WAS going to get me & the kid to the train on time! Then, they flung my stuff on the cart & helped me up, without ever waking the baby!
    Off we went, as our new & never to be forgotten friends ran behind us waving & even blowing a kiss!
    What a hilarious sight we all were! Oh, but I’m so glad I packed more food than I needed!

    Liked by 6 people

  252. Rahma Kushtana says:

    Thank you for the beautiful story… reminding us that yes…we are all one.

    Like

  253. what a lovely story and how the world could be if we only stopped to try and understand that which we dont understand…

    Like

  254. P.K.PARAMESWARAN says:

    Nothing can match the joy of helping.

    Like

  255. Jody Froelich says:

    Wonderful story!

    Like

  256. great story. And it was believable up until the point about the airline handing out free apple juice. Nevertheless, it is a good story about just being human.

    Liked by 1 person

  257. Reblogged this on THE HURLEY EDITION and commented:
    I saw this post on another site, the brilliant Live & Learn by David Kanigan, a fellow Canadian. I have to say, not only is this post very indicative of what his blog is like, his blog is very inspiring to me as I am trying to reboot, restyle, and reset, I guess.

    Thank you David for a wonderful blog and thank you to Naomi Shihab Nye who is the author of this excellent post.

    I hope you all enjoy this as much as I do.

    ~ todd

    Liked by 1 person

  258. You do live in this world. It is called the USA,. A place where a woman in a hijab can travel by herself anywhere she needs to, get medical treatment that she needs and strangers come to your aid in a time of desperation.

    Like

  259. i am a Palestinian American. Thanks for sharing her story. This shows that people are good natured and generous, What wonderful story….

    Liked by 1 person

  260. Reblogged this on Natural Born Alien and commented:
    This. Such a picture of coming alongside other travellers with grace and humanity.

    Liked by 1 person

  261. Denise Toepel says:

    Traveling in airports seems to be the big equalizer. We are safe sometimes talking to strangers because we know,, we will never see the person again. I think sometimes,, what if I do? Will they acknowledge the previous moment? I think what you did was wonderful along with the “joining” you got to experience. I am an expat, living in Ecuador, here everyone talks to you,, hello, good morning, good afternoon, good night,, have a great meal,, como esta,,, it is a natural rhythm in my day now.. when I go back to America,, I get silence.
    Then I wish I was back in Ecuador where people like to see you.

    Liked by 1 person

  262. Kathy Waller says:

    Reblogged this on To write is to write is to write and commented:
    “. . . This is the world I want to live in.” ~ Naomi Shihab Nye

    Like

  263. Thank you Ellen

    Like

  264. Lovely story. Thanks!

    Like

  265. Reblogged this on sun in austin and commented:
    I, too want to live in that place.

    Liked by 1 person

  266. Great story! Its a world I think we’d all like to live in!

    Like

  267. Love, love, love this.

    Liked by 1 person

  268. Reblogged this on GoogleApps VS Office365.

    Like

  269. Absolutely LOVE this! Bless you!

    Liked by 1 person

  270. Thanks for sharing Patti, just today, I said to Flash, Gosh I wish we could just all be friends. Love this story. Love you and your family, too.

    Like

  271. Thanks so much, David. Glad this piece of Naomi’s led me to your blog (via someone affiliated with my high school a coast and 40 years away.) I came oh so close to being in a class with Naomi at Tassajara but her mother became ill just before the class, so she couldn’t make it. You serve as a reminder to look again at her schedule!

    Like

  272. Beautiful sentiments. Hoping beyond hope that in the end love and kindness shall triumph over every evil.

    Like

  273. Reblogged this on Mara Jevera Fulmer's Blog.

    Like

  274. You did good!. Now, may I please have the recipe for those cookies?

    Like

  275. As a Palestinian stand up comedian, I never hear stories that humanize us. I am going to use this in a comedy routine. We need more story tellers like Naomi. Is she on Twitter? I just love her. This is why I teach my son Arabic. I took him to the West Bank just like Naomi’s dad took her. Read my story about my visit here: http://suziesaysso.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/west-bank-visit/

    Follow me for more humanity and less fear @SuzieAfridi

    Like

  276. shewrites4 says:

    I absolutely loved this post. Thank you!

    Like

  277. What a wonderful story, it did my heart and spirits good to read this, there is always hope❤

    Like

  278. When people live with their hearts, they abundantly share love. A very nice story that reminds us how powerful we are when we simply live like HUMANS instead of locked in dogmatic cultural clusters.

    Like

  279. Reblogged this on Sacred Lessons of a Sage and commented:
    Powerful sacred lesson.

    Like

  280. Full of grace! Thank you for sharing this. Thank you for being there for her. Regardless of the language we speak, we all understand kindness.

    Like

  281. This is the world I want to live in!

    Like

  282. AWAD PAUL SIFRI says:

    What a great story!?!
    “Ma’amouls” is an Arabic sweet, some stuffed with walnuts, others with dates dates. This colloquial Arabic word, “Ma’amoul”, literally means, “It is made”, or simply, “made”.
    Yes, growing up in Palestine and Lebanon, it used to be typically made for Easter by Christian and Muslim Arab women friends and family who would gather together at one of their homes and they would bring all the fresh and wonderful ingredients and make these sweets for all the participating families. Today, it is sold year-round by bakeries that make suits and even packaged product.
    In this beautiful story, the powdered sugar that got sprinkled on those who took the “sacrament”, it was no less than a magical potion sprayed from Heaven through one of its beloved Angels.

    Awad

    Like

  283. It’s the world I want to live in, too! Such a touching story…I have tears running down my face!

    Like

  284. Beautiful story. It made me want to be there, covered in powdered sugar along with the rest of you.

    Like

  285. This was truly inspiring. I wish this would happen every time I went to the airport.

    Liked by 1 person

  286. Beautiful. I believe most people, especially women, want peace. What a lovely story.

    Like

  287. Yes! Good is here. My 6 year old daughter, on a whim, gave every single person in Trader Joe’s a hug. The whole store felt like a Christmas tree. Everyone was smiling, glowing. No fear, no awkwardness, just tender acceptance of the most beautiful of hugs. My daughter was thrilled when a customer surprised her with a gift as we were leaving the store (he budged in line just to buy the gift before we left!). It was beautiful. It was community. It is who we really are.🙂

    Like

  288. One of three items I’m sending around to my friends and family. I’ve never done that before. This story, thank you to the author and you, for posting it, for what you’ve all seen it it which I saw too, but also the picture of the hardships of being a woman in a foreign land, a settler, and, a link to the movie Frozen River, showing what those we stole the land from suffer but again, a communion between women, and the obituary of Misty Upham.

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  289. i came across this just now as I am still basking in the glow of Thanksgiving (not participating in Black Friday) and what a story of Thanksgiving it is. You have painted a hopeful and beautiful image of possibility🙂

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  290. Simply, sincerely, sweetly thank you.

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  291. david-
    Do you know the writer personally? Any idea how to get something to her? I’m from Tucson- this kind of kindness deserves a Ben’s Bell. I’d love to send her one.
    Bensbells.org

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  292. I am so encouraged by this story – in these days of mistrust light will still always, always, always overcome darkness!

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  293. A plant, to stay rooted, and cookies, as sacrament. Beautiful.

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  294. My all-time favorite prose-poem.
    I’m old enough to remember when airlines handed out free snacks when a flight was significantly delayed. How sad that so many people now find the free juice unbelievable.

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