Anemoia: So clear and still you can see your own reflection.


anemoia – n. nostalgia for a time you’ve never known

Imagine stepping through the frame into a sepia-tinted haze, where you could sit on the side of the road and watch the locals passing by. Who lived and died before any of us arrived here, who sleep in some of the same houses we do, who look up at the same moon, who breathe the same air, feel the same blood in their veins—and live in a completely different world.

Don’t miss full transcript below…

There’s an old saying:
“The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.”
Looking at old photos, it’s hard not to feel a kind of wanderlust
—a pang of nostalgia, for times you’ve never experienced.
To sit on the side of the road and watch the locals passing by.
Who lived and died before any of us arrived here,
who sleep in some of the same houses we do,
who look up at the same moon,
who breathe the same air,
feel the same blood in their veins—
and live in a completely different world.
It’s a world still covered in dust from the frontier.
A world of adults, whose lives are hammered out by hand.
A world of front porches,
of fires to light in the evening,
of conversations over a fence.
You’d watch as they carry on with their lives,
that seem so important.
Even if their story has already been told,
even if none of it risks turning out any other way but the way it happened.
But they carry on anyway.
The past is a foreign country, and we’re only tourists.
We can’t expect to understand the locals,
or why they do what they do.
We can only ask them to hold still,
so we can capture a photo to take home with us.
So we can sit for a few minutes in a world of black and white,
with clean borders that protect us from the rush of time,
like a tidepool just out of the reach of the waves,
that lets you linger in the moment—
so clear and still
you can see your own reflection.

~ John Koenig


Notes:

Comments

  1. This is perfect. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Brilliant, thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. brings a depth of quietness, understanding. insightful. his voice soothing. wonderful footage.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for sharing this. This is great, it leaves you thinking of how much the world has changed from comparing it today. Amazing and beautiful this is… Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent choice for nostalgia unknown but cherished. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Reblogged this on The English Professor at Large and commented:
    This post is given to us by Live & Learn. At this time of year, when nostalgia is near, it fits.

    Like

  7. How I loved this…and though we be but tourists in lives that aren’t our own, I think we would find that certain fundamentals transcend time – love, sustenance, work, community. Ok, perhaps we’ve really diluted ‘community’, but as for the other stuff? Yeah, definitely.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. yes – and such a wonderful word.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Opens up an interesting line of thought when family ties and memories of loved ones gone are at a high point due to seasonal holidays. Have a lovely holiday – Lorian

    Liked by 1 person

  10. “…with clean borders that protect us from the rush of time.” This clip really grabbed me, DK, and particularly this phrase. This time of year always brings a rush of nostalgia, and more so to me this year for some reason. Guess turning 50 has affected me more profoundly than I realize. At any rate, loved this…

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you so much for this. I am in the middle of doing a family history while life moves on in the here and now. This is a perfect find just now!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Reblogged this on THE STRATEGIC LEARNER.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Poignant post, thank you!!!!! Could it be, the things we bring into our lives from the past, such as various antiquities, arts, porcelains, books, that we are fascinated with, are the reminiscence and love of our past lives (as believed by such practices as Buddhists and reincarnation, the child who reaches for the object on a tray of many things, and picks up the very one thing that he possessed in his past life as a monk)!!!!!

    Like

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