People Will Never Forget How You Made Them Feel

“I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life. I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.” I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back. I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”~ Maya Angelou


I’ve heard the last sentence of this quote (many times) but never the entire passage.  It has stuck with me for several weeks.  And I had no idea who the woman, Maya Angelou, was.  (I may be the only one on the planet. Francine/Joyce, don’t scold me.)  So, I started with Wiki and then went to an Oprah Interview.  What a life.  What an inspiration. A few excerpts from Wiki and Oprah’s talk:

Maya Angelou was born in St. Louis in 1928.  She moved to rural Stamps, Arkansas, to be with her grandmother after her parents split. When she went back to St. Louis in the mid-1930s, her mother’s boyfriend stole her virginity. In the aftermath of that trauma, 8-year-old Maya became mute and rarely opened her mouth to speak for several years. At 17 she had her only child, Guy. A few years later, when her grandmother died, the grief sent her reeling.  Angelou’s list of occupations includes night-club dancer and performer, best selling author, journalist, actor, writer, director, and producer of plays, movies, and public television programs. Since 1991, she has taught at Wake Forest University.  Read the script of Oprah’s Talk at this link.  Worthy…

And thank you Mimi @ Waiting For the Karma Truck for pointing me to Maya Angelou reciting her poem: “And Still I Rise.”  (Mimi, this will be etched in memory.)


Source: Quote from Larmoyante

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Comments

  1. love that line “I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.”! and wow, what a life …

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  2. Reblogged this on anakegoodall.

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  3. That’s a lot of life for one
    Can’t decide weather to
    Cross her off for stripping
    Or wonder about all strippers

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  4. Mmmm Maya. A woman to emulate. I love the line about not going through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands. You have to be able to throw something back. I recently removed one mitt. 🙂 Ready to throw.
    I noticed Anake (a fellow reader) chose that line to comment on as well. Nice.

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  5. She’s an incredible woman ….,…… really is …..

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  6. Really? Awe-inspiring woman, with a voice that is as deep and resonant as her words. If you ever have the chance to hear her recite her poem “I rise”, it will be etched in your memory forever…

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  7. artblablablablog says:

    Very interesting, don’t feel bad, I did not know all that about her either. She is an inspiration! Thank you 🙂

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  8. I love the inspirational writings of Dr. Maya Angelou. Another of her writings is “Phenomenal Woman.” She is a wonderful example of a life as an over comer.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  9. Amazing personality, what a beautiful voice! She is truly full of life and so wise. What a special post, thanks!

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  10. Always loved Maya Angelou…she is a gift to this world. Thanks David. 🙂

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  11. Makere Stewart-Harawira says:

    Reblogged this on Makere's Blog.

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  12. I have always found Maya Angelou inspiring. Thank’s for reminding me.

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  13. My wife convinced me years ago to go to a lecture given by Maya Angelou. Wow, she was and remains amazing. In person Maya Angelou is a force of nature. Her voice and poetry has an energy all to itself. This full quote is one to stay with you and share with others in times of need. While I am a bit surprised you did not know who she was, I am glad you found her. Maya Angelou is a natural for your inspirational blog.
    – All the best, Michael

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    • Thanks Michael. What an amazing experience that must have been to see that lecture. Good for you. (As to being surprised that I didn’t know her, stick around, you’ll find more evidence of additional major gaps. :)) Thanks for your kind words.

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  14. Maya’s writings are so inspirational. Wonderful words of wisdom. 😉

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  15. I’ve always been in awe of Maya Angelou–her graciousness and generosity of spirit in the face of all she has experienced amazes me. And the way she has used that emotion to fuel her beautiful prose is a life lesson for me. Several have cited favorite passages from the piece above–it’s all inspiring, but the lines that resonate most deeply with me are “I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.”. So, so true. Touch, connection, the power of the simple exchange of energy…profound. And thx, M, for citing “I Rise.” — Awesome!

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  16. Maria Mendizabal says:

    What a lady! She is an inspiration to us all. She has endured so much in her life. Her inner strength is powerful, most inspiring. The video is wonderful – so much truth. I also agree we must reach out and touch someone. The connection is incredible – so much energy is felt in a strong hug. Thank you Dave for sharing this marvelous story.

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  17. Love Maya … she is an amazing woman. Thanks for sharing.

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  18. Same here even I have read few of its lines many times but not the complete passage. Today when I read it completely along with an intro as to who she was, what she has achieved and what she has been through I came to know the reason why she said, “but people will never forget how you made them feel…” So deep and profound.

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  19. People , words and actions ..all got feelings .

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  20. David – I was introduced to Maya Angelou through an English class in college over 30 yrs ago (“When the Caged Bird Sings” ). Her freedom-loving spirit has reigned despite her traumatic childhood experience. The statement that her “mother’s boyfriend STOLE her virginity” (italics are mine) is an unfortunate euphemism. He RAPED her when she was 8 year’s old. That’s a criminal assault and soul-crushing experience for any child. But Maya survived and thrived nevertheless.
    I loved her poem (And Still I Rise) which she read at Clinton’s inauguration… I think it sums up not only her own life triumphing over misfortune and evil but also the lives of many others who decide to take their lives to another level despite anything that has been thrown at them. I believe it’s Alice Walker who said it so well in one of her books (she too understands the human spirit): the best revenge is to love and live your life well. I so agree.
    Thank you for introducing Maya to others who may not have known her and to those of us who did but need reminders of what she stands for….

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  21. Maya Angelou’s story and her strength to share it has impacted me in so many ways. I especially love her no nonsense approach to people and their intentions. “When someone shows you who they are, believe them.”

    Through my job, I have the responsibility of navigating women from homelessness to stability. We have this quote in the den: “When you know better, do better.”

    Her words are wisdom.

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  22. Very glad that you have found Maya Angelou, David!! Two corrections: Her book is entitled, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” and the poem that she wrote and recited at Bill Clinton’s inauguration is called, “On the Pulse of Morning.” She was, indeed, a “Phenomenal Woman” (the title of another poem that she wrote).

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    • Sorry Joyce. I need some further clarification. I googled “On the Pulse of the Morning” and didn’t find that the passage I cited was part of it. Where did you see my references to a poem that should be titled “On the Pulse of Morning” and references to a book book that should be titled “I know Why the Caged Bird Signs”?

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      • Sorry, David!! You did not cite it; one of the commenters did. I was addressing that comment. It said her book title was “When the Caged Bird Sings,” instead of “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” And that Dr. Angelou recited “Still I Rise” at Clinton’s inauguration when she actually recited “On the Pulse of Morning.” Wanted to be sure that you were led in the right direction, since you were just learning about Maya Angelou!

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