What exactly?

From the beginning, he wrestles with the mute language of the canvas and the difficulty of translating his experience with it to the page: “Sometimes it is impossible to say why and how a work of art achieves its effect. I can stand in front of a painting and become filled with emotions and thoughts, evidently transmitted by the painting, and yet it is impossible to trace those emotions and thoughts back to it and say, for example, that the sorrow came from the colors, or that the longing came from the brushstrokes, or that the sudden insight that life will end lay in the motif.” The passage may be rephrased as a question: What exactly happens when a person looks at a work of art?

~ Siri Hustvedt, Karl Ove Knausgaard Reflects on the Man Who Gave Us ‘The Scream’.  (The New York Times · May 1, 2019)


Notes: I know, yes, yes, the painting is not Edvard Munch’s “The Scream.” It is Claude Monet’s Meules (Haystacks, 1890) which sold this month at a Sotheby’s auction for $110.7 million, in excess of its $55 million estimate. See more at ArtNews)

Comments

  1. emotions are unlocked and open

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful –but $110m?! I hope Monet would be horrified!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    How the artist experiences the feelings? … ‘The passage may be rephrased as a question: What exactly happens when a person looks at a work of art?’ … Siri Hustvedt, Karl Ove Knausgaard Reflects on the Man Who Gave Us ‘The Scream’. (The New York Times · May 1, 2019).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. It is all a personal thing, isn’t it?
    I have a picture I want to use for a poem and my words are not coming… I shall continue to stare at it. Maybe they will.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I have read the (last free article…) about Edvart Munch’s art and yet I still fail to see any corelation between a Monet painting (not the one I personally like particularly, I’ve seen it in an exhibition) and an article on Munch….
    There would be so much to say about any Monet painting without consulting another Munch narrative. Just saying.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Like looking at a scene to photograph, why sometimes looking at it can bring those same emotions, and you know you must capture it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I don’t know what exactly. Klimt is one of the few that speak to me. Can feel him right there.
    Other forms of art are a different story. Photography speaks deeper to me than paintings. But I have a soft spot for paintings with humans in them.
    I have great respect for those who spend the money to help preserve.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I know what I like and don’t like which is something

    Like

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