I Believe


Thanks Rachel


“I think I’ll be last. But it doesn’t matter.”


Olympics? Sportsmanship? Right here.


SMWI*: Football Weekend – Italian Style.

RBS 6 Nations 2014 on Dmax Italy from silvia morganti on Vimeo.


Inspired? Yes.  Listening for the referee’s call of “crouch, bind, set” – – watching the players bind together – heads interlocking with the opposition — followed by brute force. Add rain and mud and what you have here is a Man’s Sport.


SMWI* = Saturday Morning Work-out Inspiration

SMWI*: Cranberries


This is a bit of a departure from the usual SMWI* (Saturday Morning Workout Inspiration) clips but no less inspiring.  The imagery on this short film is stunning.  This video was filmed in Manitowish Waters, Wisconsin in cranberry bogs.  This extreme sport is called winch boarding which involves “being pulled by a large machine while on a skateboard, surfboard, snowboard, or other type of board.”  Don’t quit on this one too early.

(Source: The Minneapolis Egotist: Two Locals & Red Bull Created a Stunning Cranberry Wakeskating Video.

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah

zip line, zip lining

The hotel made us sign a waiver before we stepped on the bus. We had to sign a second waiver at the check-in after we arrived at the Tour Site.

Please read carefully, complete and then sign below.

  1. Has a doctor advised you not to participate in certain activities?
  2. Do you have any fears of the following: closed or open spaces; heights; and/or animals?
  3. Do you have any vision, hearing, or balance problems?
  4. Have you ever had an attack or stroke?
  5. Do you frequently suffer from motion sickness?
  6. Do you have a history of blackouts or fainting?
  7. Do you have motor skill impairments or difficulties?

I understand there are inherent risks in going on the tour, including but not limited to equipment failure, acts of other participants, adverse weather conditions, and forces of nature, and I hereby assume the risk.

“Dad, I can’t believe you’re doing this!”
Silence.
“Dad, you didn’t check off #2!”
Silence. I couldn’t look up at her. I looked down at the clipboard. It was shaking in my hands.
“X” marked the spot. My last rites.

[Read more...]

SMWI*: Just Do it!

funny, exercise, workout,fitness,weight loss, lazy, homer simpson, nike, just do it


  • SMWI*: Saturday Morning Workout Inspiration.  Spoof of Nike’s “swoosh” symbol and “Just Do It” exercise ad campaign.
  • Source: TheMetaPicture

Work-Out Inspiration: 100 years old. And still running.

espn, sports, inspirational

  • Fauja Singh ran his first marathon at age 89 and became an international sensation.
  • Records?  Fastest to run a marathon (male, over age 90), fastest to run 5,000 meters (male, over age 100), fastest to run 3,000 meters (male, over age 100), and on and on they went.
  • By his second birthday, Fauja’s parents had cause for concern: He couldn’t walk. His legs were short and spindly, capable of movement but too weak to support his body. He turned 3. No steps yet. Then 4. Still crawling. Children called him danda, Punjabi for “stick.” Family members worried he might be crippled for life, so they consulted village doctors…At age 5, he developed enough strength to hobble. Proper walking didn’t come until around age 10.
  • His goal?  Get into the Guinness Book of World Records for finishing a Marathon at 100 years old.  The race: The Toronto Waterfront Marathon on October 16, 2011. He’d finished in 8 hours, 25 minutes. He waved to the crowd as he walked across the line, then lifted his arms and accepted a medal. There were smiles and handshakes and photos with friends and strangers, then a rambling news conference for Fauja to reflect on his record. Amid the chaos and congratulations, however, Fauja never noticed the absence of one celebrant they’d expected. Guinness. (Guinness would not recognize Fauja Singh for the record. Read why at this link.)

Source: ESPN – The Runner.  Hit this link to read the full story.  Inspiring.


Epilogue: On February 23, 2013, Fauja Singh finished the Hong Kong 10km (6.25 mile) event in one hour, 32 minutes and 28 seconds. (Source: BBC News – Oldest Man Runs His Last Race)


DK Note to Self: Get. Off. The. Couch.

Saturday Morning Work-Out Inspiration: “I wanted to fit in so badly”

wrestler,inspirational,inspiring,wrestling, sport

A goose bump story from Deadspin.  Anthony Robles was born poor and one-legged in Mesa, Arizona. Anthony never met his biological father.  He longed for acceptance from his stepfather who wouldn’t forgive him for the color of his skin.  He criticized his step-son mercilessly and physically abused his Mother in his presence.  Anthony was bullied at school and he chose wrestling to toughen up. He lost every match at first. Then he found the key… Opponents were baffled. Four years later he was a national champion. And now he planned to quit a sport just as he had come to dominate.

Whether you love, hate or are indifferent about sports or wrestling, this is one of the most powerful human interest stories that I’ve read. Some excerpts:

“The day Robles entered the world, doctors whisked him from the delivery room, to spare his mother, 16 years old and single, the shock of seeing her one-legged child. He was what’s known as a congenital amputee, and the cause of his condition remains unknown. When the doctors finally returned him to his mother, she looked her boy over carefully and predicted that the smooth declivity where his right leg should have been marked the end of her freedom forever.”

“Three years later, another doctor thought Robles would walk better with a prosthesis and fitted him with a heavy artificial leg. The boy promptly took it off when he got home and hid it behind a piece of furniture. At five, he shinnied 50 feet up a pole outside his house.”

“But if Robles was willful and assured by nature, a childhood of being stared at and taunted eventually saddled him with terrible self-consciousness. ‘I wanted to fit in so badly,’ he later said of his elementary and junior high school years. ‘For a while I tried to hide … to be camouflaged.’ But the bullies were not put off, and Robles gave up trying to disguise his differences.”

[Read more...]

I should have stayed out there…

Rory McIlroy

“I learned that when the going gets tough, I’ve got to stick in there a bit more and I’ve got to grind it out.  There’s no excuse for quitting, and it doesn’t set a good example for the kids watching me, trying to emulate what I do.  It wasn’t good for a whole lot of reasons, for the tournament, the people coming out to watch me.  I feel like I let a lot of people down with what I did last week and you know, for that I am very sorry.”

~ Rory McIlroy, 23, is the world’s No. 1 golfer.

He was seven over par after eight holes and looking at another potential bogey or worse after his second shot on the par-5 18th landed in the water.  He withdrew without finishing his ninth hole.  An hour later, he released a statement saying a sore wisdom tooth had made it impossible for him to continue.


Good for you young man. Good for you to own up…


Source: New York Times

Related Posts:

Moonwalk

The video share is courtesy of Anake Goodall…a long standing blog roll member from down under – – and a man with an eye that captures my full attention with his posts each morning.  This clip features Dean Potter (aka “The Man Who Can Fly“).  Potter walks a highline at Cathedral Peak in Yosemite National Park as the sun sets and the full moon rises.  Beautiful.  Mesmerizing.


Source: Thank you Anake Goodall.  Be sure to check out his blog.

Un-Related Posts but one of my favorites from the archives:

People are awesome

Here’s an inspiration for your Saturday Morning Work-out (or something)…many wows here.


Thank you John E. Smith @ The Strategic Learner for sharing.

Related Posts:

Work-out Inspiration: Brothers on the Run…

Didn’t do this as a kid.  Wish I could have done it as a kid.  Wouldn’t dream of doing it today.  Something peaceful and zen about flowboarding and especially breathtaking in the mountains of Chile…longer clip, pan through it…


Related Posts:

Hard to discern where his talent ends and his work ethic begins…

Andy Roddick is retiring this season after being “the face of men’s tennis in the U.S. for more than a decade.”  What wasn’t obvious to me until reading this article from the NY Times, was the depth of his character, his integrity and his drive.  With so many bad actors in professional sports, this story was inspiring.  Here’s a few excerpts:

“He’s a study in contradictions: a born entertainer who doesn’t like to leave home; a team player in an individual sport; a deep feeler who is quick to give you a piece of his mind or the shirt off his back; a lunch-pail prodigy.”

“He was precocious, yes, but his defining characteristic has been his persistence. Roddick never had the luxury of coasting, of taking his gifts for granted. How else but through grit and guts does a player with a balky backhand and a butcher’s touch at the net finish in the top 10 in the world for eight consecutive years?”

“Roddick’s serve is such a blur, people have a hard time discerning where his talent ends and his work ethic begins. He’s a classic overachiever who was cast as the suave leading man of American men’s tennis, a role that, true to his nature, he worked earnestly and endlessly to wholly inhabit.” [Read more...]

Guest Post: Squirm. Splash. Sink.

After reading Friday’s post (The King loses (again)…), Eric (18, son) was inspired to share a family vacation story.  The fact that he read my post was a head-scratcher…so best to nurture this sudden interest in both reading and writing.  I should disclose upfront, that I fail to see any humor in this story – and I say “story” as I don’t recall this version of the events.  Here it is…unedited and unplugged.  (And yes, the photo is an actual photo of me during the scuba lesson.)

scubaSQUIRM. SPLASH. SINK.

By Eric Kanigan

Anyone who knows my Dad personally can attest to the enjoyment he gets out of poking fun at others, to phrase it nicely (in reality it’s usually a firm jab rather than a poke). For those that do not know him, just imagine a person who loves to relive the details of your painfully embarrassing moments months, sometimes years after they occur. Throw in a mustache to your mental image and presto! You have David Kanigan!

It only seems fitting to return the favor, so it’s time for a trip down memory lane.

[Read more...]

Think I’ll go for a ride…

I’m jumping the gun on my Saturday morning work-out inspiration clip – but this morning feels like a bike ride.  This music video was instant inspiration for me and brought back childhood memories.  Thank you Rob Firchau for sharing.  Enjoy…

Think I’ll go for a ride…take the bike out of the shed…make a fresh start…when the head spins…there is no joy…put me on the saddle…and I’m a little boy…a little boy on a mission…we’re like Fred and Ginger…when the’re doing their dance…to the sound of rubber…out on the old bog road…I’m as free as a bird…It helps me remember…How good it used to be…feeling like a king…the bike, the road, and me…You hope the skies don’t open…when home is many miles…you think your’e just cruising…life is flowing along…a fall or a puncture…anything can go wrong…you’re vulnerable…at the mercy of the wind…with every hill you climb…you begin and begin and begin…with the freedom of the road…summer evenings on the road…the cool breeze in my hair…poetry in motion…on two wheels in Kildare…”



Source: Thank you The Hammock Papers.

Related Posts:

Mr. Bean & Chariots of Fire

Mr. Bean

If you are a Mr. Bean fan and you tuned in for the opening ceremony at the London Olympics, you will be nodding your head in agreement with the chart.  Mr. Bean stole the show playing Chariots of Fire.  If you missed the show, you can catch it on this NBC Olympic video clip.

 


Chart Source: ilovecharts

Related Posts: The ultimate repeated-note technic @ LaDona’s Music Studio

All we need is…

 


Image Credit

Hump Day Inspiration: A man must constantly exceed his level…

This inspiring story is about Bruce Lee, a legendary martial art master.  From: The Art of Expressing the Human Body.  (Bruce Lee, John Little).

Here’s a few excerpts:

“Lee realized early on that in order for us to fulfill our physical potential, we had to approach our exercise endeavors progressively and fight against the desire to pack it all in and retire to the sofa and the television where we could escape from our ‘duty’ of self-actualization by partaking in its opposite – that is, shutting off our minds and allowing our muscles to atrophy. Lee wanted to learn as much about his mind and body as possible. He wanted to know what he was truly capable of, rather than settling for what he already knew he could accomplish. To this end, he viewed each training session as a learning experience, an opportunity for improvement to take himself to a new level. As a result, he had a keen eye for spotting people who were selling themselves short by either slacking off in their training or by underestimating what their true capabilities were.

Stirling Silliphant (a student of Lee’s) related an interesting story that perfectly embodies Lee’s attitude toward progressive resistance in cardiovascular training, as well as his refusal to let a person – in this case Silliphant – underestimate his own physical potential:”

[Read more...]

Human flight…chilling, goosebumps, crazy!

Experience Freedom from Betty Wants In on Vimeo.

<hr />

Thank you Listen2thea

People Are Awesome (Bit Crazy too)…Wow!

Another great post borrowed from Anderson Layman’s Blog.  Thank you Steve Layman.

Endurance at a Deity Level. Digging Deep (Way Deep).

This Sunday’s NY Times Magazine has a must-read article on Diana Nyad, a marathon swimmer: “Marathon Swimmer Diana Nyad Takes On the Demons of the Sea.”  Her endurance is unimaginable.  She was a swimming prodigy as a youngster.  She suffered sexual abuse throughout high school and sought refuge in the water.  She swims in shark invested waters. Subjects herself to jelly fish stings and endures “chafing, nausea, hypothermia, swollen lips, an irritated mouth, diarrhea, sleep deprivation.”  And she’s still at it at 62 years old looking to swim 103 miles from Havana, Cuba to Key West.  Many ask her why she does it and she thinks:  “I’m a rare breed. There aren’t many people in the world who can do this.”  Oh, you are so right on that point.  Excellent article worth reading in its entirety – here’s some of my favorite excerpts:

[Read more...]

The Meaning of Hockey – For Canadians, in priority line with Bread, Salt & Water…

LUOOOOO!!!

In Canada, Hockey is Religion.  And o’ how the memory is tugged back to the days.  5:30am practices.  Trudging to the arena.  Wiggling your toes in ice skates desperately trying to stay warm – – in a bitterly cold aluminum sided ice arena where gusts of Arctic air whistle in.  And, whether it was sitting in front of the black and white watching Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night.  Or the country standing still during the gut wrenching 1972 Canada Cup Series against the Russians.  Or in the locker room during high school or collegiate play where as Penguins coach Kevin Constantine quoted: “We only speak two languages here: English and profanity.”  Hockey is part of Canadians’ DNA.  Hockey is part of who I am.  Part of me.  This article is written by Stephen Marche who had written Lucy Hardin’s Missing Period and three other books, including How Shakespeare Changed Everything.  It’s LONG but worthy for those Canadians among us who will appreciate his unique perspective…and offers non-Canadians some insights into the game and into us.  Several of my favorite excerpts.

“In Canada, even death waits on hockey.”

“Two features distinguish hockey from all other sports: its peculiar relationship to violence, and its pace, which is just beyond the organic capacities of human biology.”

“Despite its current dominance of our national space, hockey has always been a stolen game, a suppressed game, on the edge of society’s norms, dirty, lower class. There will always be an uncivilized edge to hockey, a wildness at its heart that disturbs proper society.”

“Hockey is the most popular expression of the Canadian dream. In the American dream, a man enters the wilderness to fashion a home for his family out of the abundant raw materials of the continent. The Canadian dream is much more lonely and rough. A man goes into the backcountry and becomes wild. The Canadian dream, a métis dream, is a distinct species of pastoral, unknown elsewhere in the world. To understand hockey, you need to understand the unique relationship to wilderness contained in its northernness.”

“Canadian socialists — from early realists like Tommy Douglas to contemporary nihilists like Naomi Klein — take strength from their insistence on struggle rather than in any dream of a beautiful future. It is the struggle that matters, always the struggle that is worthy of respect. And this emphasis can be crippling: You must struggle. Comfort with oneself and one’s surroundings are signs of corruption.”

“Skilled violence against speed, the little brother of war against the mechanics of modernity. The history of hockey is the working out of the fundamental contradictions inherent in amétis game. The greatest series of all time — Canada against Russia in 1972 — was so charged with meaning because of the stark separation of hockey’s two fundamental dimensions. The Russians had mastered speed and skating.  The Canadians had mastered violence. “

“This is one of the few sports in the world where you can punch an opponent in the face and continue playing.

Source: Walrus: The Meaning of Hockey – Steven Marche