A Walk In The Snow

the-new-yorker-snow-winter-cover

This week’s cover of The New Yorker is Mark Ulriksen’s “A Walk in the Snow”:

In his recently published book, “Dogs Rule Nonchalantly,” Ulriksen explains his predilection for painting man’s best friend: “Dogs give you their undivided attention,” he writes. “They watch your every gesture, read your every emotion, listen attentively to every word you say—until they hear the rustle of a bag of chips being opened.” Or, in the winter after a snowstorm, until you open the door to go outside.

Be sure to check out several of Ulriksen’s images of dogs here: Mark Ulriksen’s “A Walk in the Snow”.


Notes:

 

About right….

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…well.
I am filled with snow.
There’s nothing to do now
but wait.

Jill Osier, from “Snow Becoming Light by Morning.”


The Weather Channel: SNOW. 22° F. Feels like 12° F.  Snow is accumulating rapidly. (12 inches and counting)


Credits:

Truth

snow-winter-netflix-movie

 

Don’t miss the other 6 charts at: 7 Snow Day Charts To Help You Weather The Storm


Thank you Moira

Today’s Forecast: Snow Day!

peanuts


Source: Peanuts

Saturday Morning: You think you’ll never forget.

January 24, 2015, Connecticut

Our first major snowfall arrived overnight.

soon will the winter be on us, snow-hushed and heavy. (Sara Teasdale)

…suppose we did our work like the snow, quietly, quietly, leaving nothing out. (Wendell Berry)

…The country seems bigger, for you can see through the bare trees. There are times when the woods is absolutely still and quiet. The house holds warmth. A wet snow comes in the night and covers the ground and clings to the trees, making the whole world white. For a while in the morning the world is perfect and beautiful. You think you will never forget… (Wendell Berry)


 

So fill your glass. Here’s tae us.

footprints-in-snow

Remember, the time of year
when the future appears
like a blank sheet of paper
a clean calendar, a new chance.
On thick white snow

you vow fresh footprints
then watch them go
with the wind’s hearty gust.
So fill your glass. Here’s tae us.
Promises
made to be broken, made to last.

Jackie Kay, “Promise”


Notes:

  1. About Jackie Kay: Jackie Kay (b. 1961) is an award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and plays, whose subtle investigation into the complexities of identity have been informed by her own life. Born in Edinburgh to a Scottish mother and Nigerian father, she was adopted as a baby by a white couple. Kay’s awareness of her different heritages inspired her first book of poetry, The Adoption Papers, which dramatises her experience through the creation of three contrasting narrators: an adoptive mother, a birth mother and a daughter.
  2. Photographer: Matt Wyles. Poem Source: litverve
  3. Find this poem in Jackie Kay’s Book: Life Mask or in Poems on the Underground by Judith Chernaik

Hushed and heavy

winter-mountains-morning-sunrise

…soon will the winter be on us,
Snow-hushed
and heavy.

~ Sara Teasdale, from September Midnight

 


Credits: Photograph – The North Wind. Poem: Lit Verve. Sara Teasdale Bio: Poetry Foundation

Runner. Grounded.

back-pain

6am Thursday:
12” snowfall overnight. DK working from home.

SK: Are you going to shovel the driveway?
DK: No.
SK: No?
DK: No.
SK: (Eye roll) You’re going to let me do it? Again?
DK: I’ll do it this afternoon after I finish my calls.
SK: No you won’t.
DK: Are you going to keep riding me on this all day?

6am Friday.
3” of additional snowfall overnight.

SK: Are you going to shovel the driveway?
DK: No.
SK: No?
DK: No. Not before work. I’m not showering again.
DK: Just leave it until I return tonight. It will warm up and melt.
SK: Really? You’re kidding right? (She heads outside to shovel.)
DK: I told you to leave it. (She has this Thing about a clean driveway)
SK: How do you plan to get out?
DK: Get out of the way. I’m going to ram through the piles with the car.

2pm Sunday.
DK ventures outside to clear the back steps. SK opens the door.

SK: Why don’t you use the steel edger/chopper to break the ice?
DK: Oh come on. Really? I’ve shoveled show before. Get inside.
SK: OK have it your way.

(Mumbling. Girl telling Canadian how to shovel snow. What’s next?)
I get after it.
I bend the show shovel trying to break the ice.
I lean on it to try bend it back.
I look through the back door to see if she’s watching.
Coast is clear.
I stomp through the snow to get to the garage to get the steel chopper.
I start slamming the ice.
On the third swing, I hit concrete.
Cold, vibrating steel.
Shooting, stabbing pain in my lower back.
Air whooshes out of my lungs.
I fall to my knees. (Dear God help me.)

SK: What’s wrong?
DK: My back.
SK: You’re joking, right?
DK: Does it look like a joke? (I crawl upstairs to bed.)
SK: (Laughing) Do you see any irony here?
DK: No. I don’t actually. None.
DK: I do see you getting enormous pleasure seeing me keeled over in pain.
SK: Oh, come on. Big Man clears 2-steps. I shovel massive piles of snow. (Still laughing)
DK: Stay away from me. Way back.

Snow forecast 3″-5” tonight.


Image Credit

T.G.I.F.: My head, my eyes now, I have a little pain.


Last Wednesday, this Man is walking down a Brooklyn street as two snow plows pass by.  The action is recorded on an auto dealer’s security camera.  “Pedro, who was looking at his feet as he walked along the snow-covered sidewalk, says he had no idea the wave of slush was headed his way.”  The force of the snow also broke the window of the dealer. 

“Then, ‘Oh, I’m on the floor,’” he recalled at the dealership Tuesday. “My head, my eyes now, I have a little pain.”

Following the brutal knockdown seen half a million times on the Internet, Pedro says, “I wake up and just go home.”

Pedro said he hadn’t heard from the city — and may file suit after the smack down. The unleashing of an avalanche of snow on an unsuspecting pedestrian is “not safe,” Pedro said. “It’s a problem.”


Source: NY Daily News


Enough already

funny-snow-winter-shovel


Image Credit