So beautiful it can’t be expressed in words. And makes your heart ache because of it.


We rollin’ with Mozart for the 2nd consecutive night.  Tonight…Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro—”Canozonetta Sull’aria.” This favorite scene from one of my favorite movies narrated by my favorite Voice (Morgan Freeman). Hang on until the end of the clip and be sure to watch the movie.  Found on Amazon here.

VOLUME UP.


Inspired by Schonwieder

Vedrai Carino


Tara Rose Davison, performs Mozart’s “Vedrai, Carino” (“You shall see my dear“) which is from Act II, Scene I of the Italian opera Don Giovanni which premiered in 1787, 226 years ago.  (Mozart was 31 years old at the time.  Man was Genius.)

Davison is a soprano and classical guitarist. She began her career as an opera singer. By the age of 21, she was the youngest finalist in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions.  During graduate school, Tara’s passion for the classical guitar sparked a shift in her musical career. She realized that her true passion lay in the under-recognized genre of art songs with classical guitar accompaniment.  Tara has since made it her mission to un-earth, perform and record the hundreds of “lost songs” in the repertoire.  She dedicated her master’s thesis to compiling a complete bibliography of works for voice and classical guitar and ended up accompanying herself for both of her graduate voice recitals. Tara currently performs music for classical guitar and voice around Southern California; teaches voice, classical guitar and piano; and studies classical guitar. Most recently, Tara was selected to perform at the 2014 Guitar Foundation of America National Convention. (See full bio here.)

Find her album on ITunes: Love Songs & Lullabies.


Video Source: Thank you Mme Scherzo


Hit it Anna. Hit it.


Anna Yuryevna Netrebko, 42, is a Russian operatic soprano. She now holds dual Russian and Austrian citizenship and currently resides in Vienna. She has been nicknamed “La Bellissima” (The Beautiful) by fans.

Sunday Morning with Julia Lezhneva

Julia Lezhneva, 23, is a Russian soprano and opera singer.  She was born on Sakhalin Island into a family of geophysicists. She has travelled the world at a  young age performing at concerts, competitions and festivals at some of the world’s greatest venues.   I’m not an opera fan but this young lady is inspiring.  She has found her calling. She has achieved Mastery and Excellence at a very young age.  The joy in her face, her words and her music lights up the room.  This CBS-like “Sunday Morning” clip leaves me invigorated about the generations coming behind us.  Bravo Julia.  You are something special.


And if you are interested in hearing more from Julia Lezhneva, here’s a 2-minute excerpt from Handel’s “Saeviat tellus inter rigores”.


Sources: Thank you Rob @ The Hammock Papers for posting this clip and pointing me to Lezhneva.  Be sure to check out his blog for similar inspiring posts. It’s a daily stop for me.

Sunday Morning: Romancing the Wind

Ray Bethell, ~85 years old, is a professional kite flyer from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  He never picked up a kite until he was 50.  He is self-taught.  He contracted a rare virus in his early 60s that left him completely deaf.  He has travelled and performed worldwide and has won many kite flying competitions.  In this video, he performs a kite ballet with three kites to Flower Duet from Lakme by Delibes. I can manage to get one kite up on a windy day.  This man, performs magic.  What an inspiration. Volume up.



Ray Bethell was the subject of a documentary short film titled “Good Stuff” which won first place at the 2005 TriBeca Film Festival in New York City.  This film, which I’ve included below, is well worth a watch and listen as well.

Good Sunday Morning…


Sources:

  • Thank you Bobby for sharing this video.
  • Check out his Ray Bethell’s website at this link and his bio here.

Tchaikovsky: We must always work…

“Do not believe those who try to persuade you that composition is only a cold exercise of the intellect. The only music capable of moving and touching us is that which flows from the depths of a composer’s soul when he is stirred by inspiration. There is no doubt that even the greatest musical geniuses have sometimes worked without inspiration. This guest does not always respond to the first invitation. We must always work, and a self-respecting artist must not fold his hands on the pretext that he is not in the mood. If we wait for the mood, without endeavouring to meet it half-way, we easily become indolent and apathetic. We must be patient, and believe that inspiration will come to those who can master their disinclination.

A few days ago I told you I was working every day without any real inspiration. Had I given way to my disinclination, undoubtedly I should have drifted into a long period of idleness. But my patience and faith did not fail me, and to-day I felt that inexplicable glow of inspiration of which I told you; thanks to which I know beforehand that whatever I write to-day will have power to make an impression, and to touch the hearts of those who hear it. I hope you will not think I am indulging in self-laudation, if I tell you that I very seldom suffer from this disinclination to work. I believe the reason for this is that I am naturally patient. I have learnt to master myself, and I am glad I have not followed in the steps of some of my Russian colleagues, who have no self-confidence and are so impatient that at the least difficulty they are ready to throw up the sponge. This is why, in spite of great gifts, they accomplish so little, and that in an amateur way.”

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky


Source: Brainpickings.  Tchaikovsky, the legendary composer, wrote this in a letter to his benefactress, Nadezhda von Meck, dated March 17th, 1878.  It can be found in the 1905 volumeThe Life & Letters of Pete Ilich Tchaikovsky.

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