Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Breakfast!

dive-1-kingfisher-bird-fishing-gif dive-2-kingfisher-bird-diving-fishing-gif-fish dive-3-kingfisher-dive-diving-fishing-fish-bird dive-4-kingfisher-diving-fishing-gif-bird

Source: (Kingfisher diving underwater to catch fish in slow motion)

What are these words worth?

September, October,

What are these words worth?
Who else would believe
these trees &
this sun &
this Aeolian gust?
Amen again.

~ Nate Pritts, “Feelings, Associated,” Right Now More Than Ever: Poems

Credits: Poem – the distance between two doors. Photo: We Heart It.  Bio/website: Natt Pritts

T.G.I.F.: Let’s be – that kind of clear.


Let’s walk around outside
and forget it is raining.
Let’s get soaked in all that noise.
Let’s be water all day,
and breathe like low tide when we sleep,
breathe like dew, and grateful faucets.
Let’s be the ice melting at the top of mountains—
that kind of clear.

~ Sophia Holtz, “Prayer to be Said on the Evening of a Terrible Day

Credits: Poem Source: The Sensual Starfish. Photograph: Namaste

Go Big. Go Right. (Be Moved)

Southern right whales, which can measure about 55 feet and weigh up to 60 tons, were once hunted to the brink of extinction. The present population off Australia numbers about 2,500. The global population is about 12,000.

“Dave Price who was just making his way over to the whales on his stand-up board said they were really inquisitive and came over to meet him.  There was one time when the whales lifted their heads up [and] looked up over Pricey’s board. They were so inquisitive and wanted to know what he was.”


The softest kiss

David Jones

Source: David Jones

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Breakfast!

Autumn. It shows its disposition to calm, to what feels like a stasis, a pause


NOW and AGAIN the earth begins to desire rest. And in the weeks of autumn especially it shows its disposition to calm, to what feels like a stasis, a pause. The ocean retains its warmth, while high white cloud-boats ride out of the west. Now the birds of the woods are often quiet, but on the shore, the migrating sanderlings and plovers are many and vocal, rafts of terns with the year’s young among them come with the incoming tides, and plunge into the waves, and rise with silver leaves in their beaks. One can almost see the pulsing of their hearts, vigorous and tiny in the trim of white feathers.  Where I live, on the harbor edge of the Cape’s last town, perfect strangers walking along the beach turn and say to each other, without embarrassment or hesitation: isn’t it beautiful.

~ Mary Oliver, Where I Live from Long Life: Essays and Other Writings


Monday Morning Wake-Up Call


Source: Mennyfox55

It’s getting quiet out there. Too quiet.

Stuart Palley

“Have you heard? Or more accurately, not heard? Vicious fires and vanishing ice floes aside, there’s yet another ominous sign that all is not well with the natural world: it’s getting quiet out there. Too quiet. […]

This is the chilling news: Bit by bit, bird by bird, species by species, gurgling brook by gushing river, the song of wild nature is, in many places, falling deathly silent…In short: What once was a rich, varied symphony of sound has become a far more subdued chamber orchestra, with large spaces of eerie silence where there was once a vast natural racket, signifying everything. […]

But overall, the tonal shift is undeniable, and deeply unsettling: There is now less birdsong than at any time in human history. Fewer lions’ roars,  beehive hums, elephant rumbles, frog croakings, simply because we’ve killed off so many of them, and show no signs of slowing. One by one and species by category, the orchestra’s players are exiting the stage. The concert will never be over, but at this rate, it might be a very bleak final movement indeed.”

~ Mark Morford

Don’t miss his entire post here: The Silence of the Birds: When nature gets quiet, be very afraid

Photo: Don’t miss Stuart Palley‘s photographs of wildfires in California in a series titled Terra Flamma.

Sunday Morning


“Researchers made a surprising and encouraging discovery in British Columbia this week: a new baby orca among the endangered Southern Resident killer whale population in the Pacific Northwest. “The calf, designated as L122, was spotted alongside mother L91 by NOAA scientists and colleagues near Sooke, British Columbia,” NOAA Fisheries West Coast announced on Facebook. “L122 is the fifth new baby to come into the population since December 2014.”

See and read more: Baby orca adds to endangered killer whale population

Source: Grindtv