Are you getting lapped?

laps

Tim Sanders: If You Don’t Expand This Annually, You Are Getting Lapped:

Here’s the point: If you aren’t expanding your resume every year, you are likely being getting lapped in the sport of business by those that do.  You can improve a resume without changing jobs.  You can add areas of expertise or new areas of project work.  You can add volunteer work, hobbies or interests. You can add professional associations you’ve joined and contributed to.  All of these additions give your career a sense of momentum, which gives you the confidence to embrace change. My point is more salient for those reading this post born in my generations (Boomer and Echo Boomer).  We become very comfortable with our titles, our financial stability and our status…

Read more on how here.


Image Credit: Thank you Carol

Get in there and learn baby, NOW.


The tortured soul lives alone.
90-year Ed Bray served in WW II and served in Normandy.
He’s covered this up for 80 years.

Join me in being inspired by Mr. Bray. I was moved…


Repeat after me: “Plimpplampplettere”

mai pen rai-thai-worry-word

skip stones

[Read more...]

What I regret most in my life are failures of…

George Saunders

READ THIS.  You will not be disappointed.  It started my day off on the right foot.


From George Saunders’ 2013 “Advice to Graduates” commencement speech @ Syracuse University:

“…Now, one useful thing you can do with an old person, in addition to borrowing money from them, or asking them to do one of their old-time “dances,” so you can watch, while laughing, is ask: “Looking back, what do you regret?”  And they’ll tell you.  Sometimes, as you know, they’ll tell you even if you haven’t asked.  Sometimes, even when you’ve specifically requested they not tell you, they’ll tell you.

So: What do I regret?  Being poor from time to time?  Not really.  Working terrible jobs, like “knuckle-puller in a slaughterhouse?”  (And don’t even ASK what that entails.)  No.  I don’t regret that.  Skinny-dipping in a river in Sumatra, a little buzzed, and looking up and seeing like 300 monkeys sitting on a pipeline, pooping down into the river, the river in which I was swimming, with my mouth open, naked?  And getting deathly ill afterwards, and staying sick for the next seven months?  Not so much.  Do I regret the occasional humiliation?  Like once, playing hockey in front of a big crowd, including this girl I really liked, I somehow managed, while falling and emitting this weird whooping noise, to score on my own goalie, while also sending my stick flying into the crowd, nearly hitting that girl?  No.  I don’t even regret that.

But here’s something I do regret…What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness. Those moments when another human being was there, in front of me, suffering, and I responded…sensibly.  Reservedly.  Mildly.  Or, to look at it from the other end of the telescope:  Who, in your life, do you remember most fondly, with the most undeniable feelings of warmth? Those who were kindest to you, I bet… [Read more...]

Monday Mantra: Cleaning Piece III

Cleaning-piece Yoko Ono


This one made me think.  (And I averted my eyes away from the double negative as I re-read this 3x.)

If you are curious about Yoko Ono’s Cleaning Piece I, II and IV (I was), you’ll find them @ Ibloghappiness.


Source: thisisnthappiness

Voting Booths Are Re-Open!

My voting booths are opening again to rename my blog. (Just kidding!)  Yet, if you missed this huge event (hyperbole squared) and can’t wait to learn more, you can find details here and here.

Anake Goodall shared this new Gapingvoid post with me and said that someone is sending me a message…and I need to listen up.

Disclosure: I have blocked my family members from commenting on this post.

live_learn_love - gapingvoid - hugh mcleod


Related Posts:

Life is going by too fast…

Charlie Brown, Linus, Peanuts, Baseball, learn


Source: Thank you Not Perfect Me

Related Posts:

Read to lead.

From HBR Blog Network: For Those Who Want to Lead, Read.  (DK: I believe all of this to be true.)

reading“…For the first time in American history, “less than half of the U.S. adult American population is reading literature.”

“…This is terrible for leadership, where trends are even more pronounced. Business people seem to be reading less — particularly material unrelated to business. But deep, broad reading habits are often a defining characteristic of our greatest leaders and can catalyze insight, innovation, empathy, and personal effectiveness.”

“…And history is littered not only with great leaders who were avid readers and writers (remember, Winston Churchill won his Nobel prize in Literature, not Peace), but with business leaders who believed that deep, broad reading cultivated in them the knowledge, habits, and talents to improve their organizations.”

“…Evidence suggests reading can improve intelligence and lead to innovation and insight…reading makes you smarter through “a larger vocabulary and more world knowledge in addition to the abstract reasoning skills.” Reading…is one of the quickest ways to acquire and assimilate new information.” [Read more...]

Sloppy is as sloppy does…(Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HBR Blog Network – I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.

…Some might call my approach to grammar extreme…I am a grammar "stickler…I have a "zero tolerance approach" to grammar mistakes that make people look stupid.…Everyone who applies for a position at either of my companies…takes a mandatory grammar test…if job hopefuls can’t distinguish between "to" and "too," their applications go into the bin.

…Good grammar is credibility, especially on the internet. In blog posts, on Facebook statuses, in e-mails, and on company websites, your words are all you have. They are a projection of you in your physical absence. And, for better or worse, people judge you if you can’t tell the difference between their, there, and they’re.

[Read more...]

See the good…

namasteThe beauty of management is that you get to ride the highs and ride the lows of humanity each day – - and sometimes within the hour. I had recently experienced one of those deep disappointing lows. And, I needed to remind myself this morning about why I love what I do. 

I was speaking to a group of interns a short time ago and they asked me what makes a great leader.  Not an unusual question coming from aspiring young professionals looking for the secret sauce – the 10 quick steps to the top.

I shared the usual profile characteristics: Engage. Truth (speak it).  Serve.  Inspire. Learn.  Recognize.  Humble (be).  Admit mistakes. Lead. WORK.

Yet, I told them it is so much bigger than this.

[Read more...]

No matter how risible, esoteric and seditious it might seem…

From Rob Firchau @ The Hammock Papers – lately, a very frequent stop for me… 

“I realized, in this moment of revelation, that what these two men were revealing was the secret of their extraordinary success, each in his own right. And it lay precisely in that insatiable curiosity, that irrepressible desire to know, no matter what the subject, no matter what the cost, even at a time when the keepers of the Doomsday Clock are willing to bet even money that the human race won’t be around to imagine anything in the year 2100, a scant 93 years from now. “Live each day as if it is your last,” said Mahatma Gandhi. “Learn as if you’ll live forever.” This is what I’m passionate about. It is precisely this. It is this inextinguishable, undaunted appetite for learning and experience, no matter how risible, no matter how esoteric, no matter how seditious it might seem.”

- Ben Dunlap on TED: A Story of a Passionate Life


Image Credit

Lay down? Or lie down?

Jon Gingerich @ Litreactor.com: 
20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes:

“…I’ve edited a monthly magazine for more than six years, and it’s a job that’s come with more frustration than reward. If there’s one thing I am grateful for — and it sure isn’t the pay — it’s that my work has allowed endless time to hone my craft to Louis Skolnick levels of grammar geekery.

Below are 20 common grammar mistakes I see routinely, not only in editorial queries and submissions, but in print: in HR manuals, blogs, magazines, newspapers, trade journals, and even best selling novels. If it makes you feel any better, I’ve made each of these mistakes a hundred times, and I know some of the best authors in history have lived to see these very toadstools appear in print. Let’s hope you can learn from some of their more famous mistakes…”

[Read more...]

Twitter. Why Bother?

Skip Prichard, is the President and CEO of the Ingram Content Group.  He’s a new blogger who posted “Why You Shouldn’t Avoid Twitter Any Longer.”  I would encourage you to read the entire post.  He outlines a number of reasons why non-users aren’t using Twitter and then follows by making a compelling case for why non-users should get on board including:

  1. It can be used as a customized News Service
  2. You start to understand and get to know the person you are following.
  3. You can meet people. (And broaden your network)
  4. You may become an expert on a topic.  Follow certain topics you sign up to follow.  It can be like a classroom.
  5. You can solicit help.
  6. You can use it for instant messaging.
  7. Whatever or whomever interests you, you can engage on Twitter.  (You can “Follow” and always “Unfollow” anyone at anytime.)

From personal experience, I can state that all of Prichard’s reasons are on point.  I have also learned that without some controls and discipline, Twitter can quickly morph into an unmanageable deluge of information (think Facebook on Steroids).  That being said, I do find it to be a useful source of real-time information, and like Prichard, I encourage you to give it a test drive.

Willpower: IT IS IN YOUR HEAD!

In this morning’s NY Times, Greg Walton (Asst Prof of Psychology @ Stanford) and Carol Dweck (professor of psychology at Stanford and the author of “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success”) shared research in an article titled Willpower – It’s in Your Head.  Good article that I would recommend reading in its entirety.  Key excerpts:

  •  “In research we conducted…, we confirmed that willpower can indeed be quite limited — but only if you believe it is. When people believe that willpower is fixed and limited, their willpower is easily depleted. But when people believe that willpower is self-renewing — that when you work hard, you’re energized to work more; that when you’ve resisted one temptation, you can better resist the next one — then people successfully exert more willpower. It turns out that willpoweris in your head.
  • “How does this happen? People who think that willpower is limited are on the lookout for signs of fatigue. When they detect fatigue, they slack off. People who get the message that willpower is not so limited may feel tired, but for them this is no sign to give up — it’s a sign to dig deeper and find more resources.”
  • “To be sure, willpower is not completely unlimited. Food and rest are of course necessary for functioning, and many struggles that people face are quite difficult. The question is how often we need extra sugar boosts. Messages suggesting that willpower is severely limited and that we need constant sugar boosts are bound to further inflate the American waistline and hinder our ability to achieve our goals.”
  • “At stake in this debate is not just a question about the nature of willpower. It’s also a question of what kind of people we want to be. Do we want to be a people who dismiss our weaknesses as unchangeable? When a student struggles in math, should we tell that student, “Don’t worry, you’re just not a math person”? Do we want him to give up in the name of biology? Or do we want him to work harder in the spirit of what he wants to become?”
Image Source: livelifeready.com