Unread. And looming.

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My reading backlog, tweaking me, ever present, ever growing.
Unread books on night stand.
Unread eBooks slumbering on my Kindle.
Unread magazines. Hard copy + digital.
Unread newspapers. Hard copy + digital.
Unread articles and blog posts on my Pocket App and Evernote App.
Unread emails in a reading folder on gmail.
All swelling, bulging, throbbing – an alien blob slime slowly cutting oxygen.

Kooser chanting: I travel the endless reaches of my ignorance, all of the books I haven’t read, and never will, come rolling at me out of the dark like a hail of asteroids.

Apparently, I don’t suffer my affliction alone:

“Many people are drowning in magazines, articles, newsletters, books and blogs they want or need to read. Is it possible to get to Magazine Zero?…”

“Three in four people say they feel overwhelmed some or all of the time by too much information from magazines, newspapers and other media…”

“Everybody has this deep dark feeling that they aren’t keeping up…”

“I hope at some point I’ll catch up…”

Read more on how others are coping here: How to Declutter Your Magazine Pile: Prioritize and ‘ABR —always be reading” with digital apps and iPods


Image Source: sentimientos-en-el-aire

T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week (Take 2)

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Source: Your EyesBlazeOut (modified)

 

A Walk In The Snow

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This week’s cover of The New Yorker is Mark Ulriksen’s “A Walk in the Snow”:

In his recently published book, “Dogs Rule Nonchalantly,” Ulriksen explains his predilection for painting man’s best friend: “Dogs give you their undivided attention,” he writes. “They watch your every gesture, read your every emotion, listen attentively to every word you say—until they hear the rustle of a bag of chips being opened.” Or, in the winter after a snowstorm, until you open the door to go outside.

Be sure to check out several of Ulriksen’s images of dogs here: Mark Ulriksen’s “A Walk in the Snow”.


Notes:

 

5:00 p.m. Bell: Fly (Home)

swallow-gif-fly


Source: Find “Swallow” and other treasures at Eclecticity

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Let’s Go People

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Up.
Down.
Breath in.
Breathe Out.


Image Source: thesensualstarfish via hayaomiyazakicartoon.


Tortoro is on the right. (I think.) Totoro is a giant, friendly forest spirit. He spends most of his time sleeping in a hole in a tree. He doesn’t speak, instead communicating by loud bellows that, it seems, only the other Totoros and the Cat Bus can understand. He is very friendly to Mei and Satsuki. He can make trees grow much faster than normal.

My Neighbor Totoro  is a 1988 Japanese animated fantasy film which tells the story of the two young daughters (Satsuki and Mei) of a professor and their interactions with friendly wood spirits in postwar rural Japan. The film won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize and the Mainichi Film Award for Best Film in 1988.

Bethany Gosvener

bethany-gosvener-art

Bethany Gosvener is a Portland, OR based visual artist.

So here I am.  Doing exactly that,  and freaking out every bit of the way.  Ha.  I’m grateful for those few years of trial and error.  They allowed me time to develop and teach myself a variety of skills.  It may sound odd,  but even I am still shocked to see the work I’m doing.  I can’t believe I had no idea this natural ability was within me.  I am in an endless debt of gratitude to Steven for pushing me,  supporting me.  For loving me through some of the hardest times of my life.  It blows me away. I am so blessed.


Image Source: Jaimejustelaphoto

Morning Bell: Let’s Roll

social media,technology,


Source: oamul.com

Goodbye August. Hello September.

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Source: Father Jim Chern’s Blog

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Let’s Go

Pocahontas, gif, disney, jump, fly, john smith, animation, film


Source: chalkandwater

Live

life-frustrado-Hossein-Zare


From My Modern Met:

Hossein Zare, is an Iranian photographer. He is an absolute master at creating spectacular photos that depict otherworldly and surreal scenes. Through a combination of photography and digital manipulation in Photoshop, Zare creates powerful images that look as if they come from dreamscapes, with recurring motifs such as ladders that stretch endlessly into the clouds, expansive and barren fields, sprawling cities, and a lone figure wandering through these strange landscapes in search of something.

More of his work can be found here: Hossein Zare