Tuesday Morning Wake Up Call: A Gentle Take-Off

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Source: Julien Douvier via Elinka, The Unsuccessful Housewife

Help, Thanks, Wow Rebecca!

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I’ve just finished the  first of Rebecca Sonlit’s new collection of 29 essays titled The Encyclopedia of Trouble and SpaciousnessMimi uses the word “transported.” I was this. And what came to mind after finishing the first essay was Anne Lamott’s Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers

  • HELP! Help God, help me write this well*. (I’ll need 3000 prayers and still not sure He would have the requisite raw material to shape this putty.)
  • THANKS! Thank you Rebecca for this sharing this wondrous talent.
  • WOW! As I sit here reading and re-reading passages. Wow!

Here’s a few excerpts from her expedition to the Arctic Circle titled Cyclopedia of an Arctic Expedition. [Read more…]

Mur. Mur. Murmur. Magnificent.

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“Tens of thousands of starlings start their murmuration, with Criffel mountain in the background, as dusk fell last night (November 5, 2014) on the England and Scotland border near Gretna Green.”


 

Cold

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As if to spare the birds at the feeder
any more competition than they already have
a snowflake drops right past the perches
crowded with finches, nuthatches, sparrows,
and without even thinking to open its wings
settles quietly onto the ground.

~ Ted Kooser. December 23, Cold. Winter Morning Walks: One Hundred Postcards to Jim Harrison


Credits: Snowflake photograph – Snowflakes and Snow Crystals by Alexey Kljatov. (45° F this morning. Cold is coming.)

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

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Source: Twins by Dayagembira via Radiating Blossom. Thank you Carol.

Monday Morning Wake-Up Call: Hellooooooo. You up yet?

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Source: Themetapicture.com


Too true, dear love, too true

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I lay in the firelight peacefully listening to pigeons on the roof.
To me pigeons say, “Too true, dear love, too true.”
I listened,
looked out on trees beyond both windows
and I was free and happy.

~ Florida Scott-Maxwell, The Measure of My Days



Monday Morning Wake-up Call

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Thank you Carol via yanen31

Frans Lanting

“No photographer turns animals into art more completely than Frans Lanting,” writes The New Yorker. Lanting’s images have been featured in exhibitions at major museums and leading art galleries around the world.

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“Impalas alarmed, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania: I keep three cameras on the seat next to me, each mounted with a different lens, allowing me to frame a moment any way it unfolds–far or wide. For this image I grabbed a Nikkor 300mm f2.8 lens to crop in smoothly on a herd of impalas when one alarm call transformed a placid scattering of grazers into a scene of suspense. An ever-present sense of danger characterizes the African plains. This image visualizes fear by inferring it. The collective gaze of the impalas points at something invisible, hidden in plain view–in a moment that could not have been chased, only waited for.”

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“Macaws over river, Tambopata National Reserve, Peru: Perched on a scaffold a hundred feet above a clay lick where macaws gather, I had an eagle’s-eye view of their coming and goings as they flew over the muddy river below. From that perspective I could see how each species of macaw flashes a distinctive combination of colors and patterns visible only from above.”


Source: DON’T MISS checking out his Lanting’s other photographs here.

FRANS LANTING has been hailed as one of the great photographers of our time. His influential work appears in books, magazines, and exhibitions around the world. Born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, he earned a master’s degree in economics then moved to the United States to study environmental planning.  Soon after, he began photographing the natural world–and never turned back.  For three decades he has documented wildlife from the Amazon to Antarctica to promote understanding about the Earth and its natural history through images that convey a passion for nature and a sense of wonder about our living planet. See his full bio here.


2º F. Us too.

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A bitter morning,
sparrows sitting together
without any necks.

~ James Hackett


James William Hackett (84, b. Seattle), is an American poet and philosopher most noted for his work with haiku in English.  (Noted he was born during the year the Great Depression started.)  The Zen poet and pioneer in creating haiku poetry in English began writing haiku in the 1950s following a near fatal accident. Spiritually reborn, he acquired a profound reverence for life, and now writes haiku with a focus upon Greater Nature and life’s Eternal Now. He is a reclusive poet dedicated to a spiritual way of haiku in English.  Hackett’s poetry is known, translated, and anthologized world wide. Hackett’s Haiku Poetry: v. 1 can be found at Amazon at this link.

Credits: Photograph by Maris Rozenfelds. Haiku from The Haiku Form by Joan Giroux via apoetreflects. Hackett Bio via haiku-hia.com