Fire Painter


French Canadian artist Steve Spazuk is from Lery, Quebec. Here’s his bio from Spazuk.com:

For the past 14 years, Spazuk has developed and perfected a unique technique that allows him to use the flame of a candle or the flame of a torch as a pencil to create his paintings with trails of soot. Using various tools, he intuitively sculpt the plumes of soot left behind in response to the shapes that appear on the canvas.

Spontaneity and chance are the heart and soul of his creative process. He does not censor. He does not direct. Spazuk opens himself to the experience. This in-the-moment creative practice coupled with the fluidity of the soot, creates a torrent of images, shadows and light. Fuelled by the quest of a perfect shape that has yet to materialize, he concentrate in a meditative act and surrender to capture the immediacy of the moment on canvas.

The human body fascinates him. Bodies in a perpetual metamorphosis are the language with which he express his thoughts on the human condition: emotions, opinions, stories that are born of his uncensored psyche. Spazuk often works piece by piece, collecting a multitude of unique elements that he assembles into mosaics.  Entities that, once grouped together, afford a different meaning and provide a new perspective that is both novel and complementary. He sees fragments of things, events, people, as a powerful metaphor of modern life and, even more so, of the way we perceive things through our senses and our minds. His work expresses how every one of us is a constituent fragment of the human community.

Check out an interview with Steve Spazuk and more of his work here.

Be sure to check out his website and his gallery of portraits here: Steve Spazuk Portraits.  Wow!

Here’s a self-portrait:

[Read more…]

Bethany Gosvener

bethany-gosvener-art

Bethany Gosvener is a Portland, OR based visual artist.

So here I am.  Doing exactly that,  and freaking out every bit of the way.  Ha.  I’m grateful for those few years of trial and error.  They allowed me time to develop and teach myself a variety of skills.  It may sound odd,  but even I am still shocked to see the work I’m doing.  I can’t believe I had no idea this natural ability was within me.  I am in an endless debt of gratitude to Steven for pushing me,  supporting me.  For loving me through some of the hardest times of my life.  It blows me away. I am so blessed.


Image Source: Jaimejustelaphoto

Nelly Drell’s Nelly Drell

This is a photograph of Nelly Drell, a 35 year old Estonian artist. Now this next painting, is Nelly Drell’s self-portrait, an oil on canvas. Where on the scale of awesomeness does this land? [Read more…]

In here lies why I’m not Picasso (or Mattisse, or…)

matisse - gif


Making Picasso’s point visible: In 2010, MoMA curators used X-ray technology to reveal the many iterations behind Henri Matisse’s painting ‘Bathers by a River,’ on which the painter worked for eight years between 1909 and 1917.


Matisse does a drawing, then he recopies it. He recopies it five times, ten times, each time with cleaner lines. He is persuaded that the last one, the most spare, is the best, the purest, the definitive one; and yet, usually it’s the first. When it comes to drawing, nothing is better than the first sketch.

~ Picasso

Despite being both a professional admirer and a personal friend of Matisse’s, he cites the painter’s notoriously methodical creative process as a betrayal of this notion that an artist should honor his or her initial creative intuition.

Read more at Brainpickings: Picasso on Work Ethic, How Creativity Works, and Why Intuitive Ideas Are More Important Than Methodical Technique


Home from work. A long day.

Dagmar-Cyrulla-drawing-woman


Dagmar Cyrulla (Australian, Melbourne) – Ebb And Flow, 2013. Drawings: Charcoal on Paper

“Recognised for producing works of stirring psychological intensity, Cyrulla has brought a new dimension to contemporary Australian art. She neither glamorises nor romanticises her subject matter but does show an intense respect for the lives portrayed by acknowledging we all have private worlds filled with mystery.”

– Catherine Caines, September 2011, Wish Magazine The Australian

Find other fine works in her portfolio here.


Source: Thank you Your Eyes Blaze Out


Omar Ortiz

painting,realism, france

“Omar Ortiz, 37, was born and lives in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Since he was a boy he has been interested in drawing and illustration. He studied for a degree in Graphic Design, where he learned different techniques such as hand drawing, pastels, charcoal, water colors, acrylics and airbrushing. He currently works with oil painting because he considers it the noblest technique.

His work is characterized as minimalistic – hyperrealism where the human body is predominate  whit texture-filled backgrounds and a magical use of fabric. “His paintings act like intimate pieces, trapped in themselves, outside of space and context.”

This painting is titled “vive la France.”  Don’t miss: Contemplation, Flaming June, The Birth of Venus

Check out his Wordpress blog @ Omar Ortiz. His official website is here.


Thank you Sensual Starfish.


Ana Teresa Fernández

art,painting,oil,clothes line

Ana-teresa-fernandez-swimming

“Ana Teresa Fernández was born in Tampico, Mexico and currently resides in San Francisco.  She earned her B.F.A. and M.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute, where she is currently an Art Professor.  She has won numerous awards and recognition for her paintings, sculptures and videos.  She is known for her exploration of women’s strength and sensuality in the process of performing labor, her provocative images of women bent over mopping floors, ironing shirts, or dragging long locks of wet hair along the floor, reveal the ambivalence of femininity: Sensual and edgy, willful but polite, powerful yet vulnerable, strong enough to do manual labor, yet beautiful in heels.”

Be sure to check out her portfolio at her web site: anateresafernandez.com


 

 

Linda Tracey Brandon

Linda-Tracey-Brandon


This is “Quail Day” – an oil painting by Linda Tracey Brandon.  Brandon is a graduate of the University of Michigan. Since then she has studied representational art through many years of workshops, classes and private instruction. Her focused study of the great masters of the past and intense daily practice has resulted in a uniquely evolving point of view.  Linda has studied with many of the best representational artists working today and currently teaches painting and drawing at Scottsdale Artists’ School in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Linda has excelled in painting the portrait and the figure. In 2006, she won a Certificate of Excellence at the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition, and in 2005 she won an Exceptional Merit Award from the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition.  Her portraits hang in many homes, businesses and institutions.  Find more of her work at her website here.  You can find her blog here.


Source: Sensual Starfish

Daryl Zang

Daryl Zang

About Daryl Zang:

My first real contact with art came early in life. I was born in 1971 in New York City and as a baby my mother often pushed my stroller through the galleries of the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum. I don’t remember a time when art was not a part of my life. I have always loved figurative painting and learned my technique earning a BFA at Syracuse University and through study in Florence, Italy.

My painting career truly came into focus after the birth of my first child. Ironically, at this time, I found it unthinkable that I would have the time or energy to take painting seriously. I found an escape in my studio and turned to self-portraiture in order to make sense of all the emotions that had arrived with this new phase of life. I created imagery that was honest and infused with a female perspective which I found difficult to find elsewhere in art. [Read more…]

The Problem

drawing-heart-Shaz-Aslam

The problem (if there was one) was simply a problem with the question. He wants to paint a bird, needs to, and the problem is why. Why paint a bird? Why do anything at all? Not how, because hows are easy, series or sequence, one foot after the other, but existentially why bother, what does it solve? Be the tree, solve for bird. What does that mean? It’s a problem of focus, it’s a problem of diligence, it’s supposed to be a grackle but it sort of got away from him. But why not let the colors do what they want, which is blend, which is kind of neighborly, if you think about it. Blackbird, he says. So be it. Indexed and normative. Who gets to measure the distance between experience and its representation? Who controls the lines of inquiry? He does, but he’s not very good at it. And just because you want to paint a bird, do actually paint a bird, it doesn’t mean you’ve accomplished anything. Maybe if it was pretty, it would mean something. Maybe if it was beautiful it would be true. But it’s not, not beautiful, not true, not even realistic, more like a man in a birdsuit, blue shoulders instead of feathers, because he isn’t looking at a bird, real bird, as he paints, he is looking at his heart, which is impossible, unless his heart is a metaphor for his heart, as everything is a metaphor for itself, so that looking at the page is like looking out the window at a bird in your chest with a song in its throat that you don’t want to hear but you paint anyway because the hand is a voice that can sing what the voice will not and the hand wants to do something useful. Sometimes, at night, in bed, before I fall asleep, I think about a poem I might write, someday, about my heart, says the heart. Answer: be the heart. Answer: be the hand. Answer: be the bird. Answer: be the sky.

~ Richard Silken

 


Credits: Poem – Fables of Reconstruction. Drawing by Shaz AslamRichard Silken Bio