T.G.I.F.: It’s been a long week


Source: huffington post


Sunday Morning: We have an imperative. A duty.


Helen Macdonald teaches at the University of Cambridge and her most recent bestselling book, ‘‘H Is for Hawk,’’ has won numerous awards. In this week’s NY Magazine, she writes about Judith Wakelam who rescues baby common swifts, “birds so exquisitely aerial that they eat, sleep and mate on the wing and spend the first two or three years of their lives migrating between Europe and Africa in continuous flight.”  Macdonald calls on wildlife rehab experts to explain why people rescue wildlife:  “…there’s something inside humans when they’re faced with a helpless creature. We have an imperative. A duty…I believe most people, especially children, simply cannot see an animal suffer…The Lindsay rehab center receives everything from bobcats to snakes, ducklings to songbirds, brought in by concerned members of the public who have driven many miles to deliver them…rescuing animals draws out ‘‘raw emotions that unleash our deepest insecurities about our humanity, mortality and place in the natural world.’’ Macdonald then closes with an evocative description of Wakelam releasing rehabbed baby common swifts back into the wild:

It stares into the wind. Then it starts shivering. Nothing has visibly changed, but something is happening. On Wakelam’s open palm a creature whose home has been paper towels and plastic boxes is turning into a different creature whose home is thousands of miles of air. It is as extraordinary a thing to witness as a dragonfly larva’s crawling out of the water and tearing itself out into a thing with wings. Then the swift decides. It hunches itself forward on its wings and drops from her flattened palm. ‘‘Up! Up! Up!’’ calls Wakelam. I’m terrified it will hit the ground. But it does not. For five or six seconds it flies with halting, unaccustomed wing beats a foot above the grass, then hitches and pulls into gear and starts to ascend, flickering upward until it becomes a remote pair of winnowing wings among all the other swifts up there. For weeks it has sat in a plastic box preening and snuggling with its foster siblings. Now it is gone, and Wakelam’s hand is its final memory of earth, the last thing it will touch for two years.

Don’t miss Helen Mcdonald’s full essay here: Rescuing Wildlife is Futile and Necessary

Image Source: Margaret Westrop – “Little Swift

A Mother’s work is never done (85 sec)

A mother raccoon is teaching her cub how to climb a tree.




caleb, wednesday

It’s going to be a long week…


  • Source: My Modern Met (12 Funny Photos of Animals on top of things)
  • Background on Caleb/Wednesday/Hump Day Posts and Geico’s original commercial: Let’s Hit it Again


Don’t like Classical? Lower form than Animal.

A zoo in Belgium has released amazing footage which seems to show their elephants swaying in time to live classical music.



Caleb Jr.!


Monday Morning Wake Up Call: Brush Teeth. And go.

Kiboko, a 31 year old Hippopotamus, opens her mouth for tooth cleaning with a new 5-foot (1.5 meter) toothbrush at the Himeji Zoo on June 4, 2015 in Himeji, Japan. Kiboko’s teeth are annually cleaned by zoo keepers and elementary school children as part of tooth cleaning education for children. June 4th is the national cavity prevention awareness day in Japan.



Thank you Horty.

Dance of Birth

David Strege @ Grindtv.com with First steps of baby elephant is touching scene:

Amy Attenborough of the Londolozi Game Reserve wrote that great ceremony accompanies the first steps a baby elephant makes, as the herd closes in to give support to the baby and the mother, after her 22-month pregnancy.

“We watched the elephants perform the dance of birth where they pirouetted in tight circles around themselves and waltzed around each other to the music of their rumbling,” Attenborough wrote.

The three elephants surrounding the baby helped it get up and steadied it on its feet. Attenborough said she was stressed, worrying the elephants might trample the baby elephant, though it appears the elephants were merely helping it stay upright until it found the strength to walk on its own.

“They also touched their trunks to it tenderly, taking turns to greet the new member of the family, all the while rumbling in the deeply comforting way that speaks to elephants and humans alike.”

It was, as Attenborough stated, an “incredibly touching scene.”


T.G.I.F.: It’s Been A Long Week

An excited baby elephant has fun clumsily climbing in and out of a big tub at the Elephantstay, an elephant sanctuary in Ayutthaya, Thailand.