David Kanigan:

I would have caved. I HAVE caved over and over and over again in similar situations. This was a terrific story. And a learning moment for me. Thank you Michael for another excellent post.

Originally posted on Real Learning, for a Change:

I’m feeling slightly proud of myself today.  I consciously used the word “IF” to transform what could have been 10 hours of purgatory into something much more acceptable.

It happened on my flight from London to San Francisco.  I booked my economy seat  months ago and did my usual thing of  reserving a decent aisle seat with full legroom (28D on a 747, in case you’re interested.  There is no galley or toilet behind the bulkhead, and the next section is Business Class, so it is also comparatively peaceful and free of traffic.)

When I got to my seat there was a stressed looking young chap pulling things out of a rucksack, the contents of which were all over my seat.  It turned out he and his newly wed wife and 2 year old daughter were also travelling. When he realised it was my seat he immediately launched into what…

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Comments

  1. This is a great story – and what brilliant idea for problem resolution when someone puts an issue on your shoulders that isn’t yours to carry.

  2. Excellent post, thx for sharing David. I, too, suffer from the “accommodate” gene and have caved many times. Michael’s solution is an excellent alternative and really does put the onus on the right part to make the change happen… Gonna keep this one in my back pocket for the future! :-)

    • Yes, Lori, I’m with you. Now, only to execute. Now, change the picture a wee bit. Let’s say the man with the seat request has crying child – a good man – looks like he’s exhausted. And Mom is sitting with 2 children. Task to push the obligation gets tougher. I’m confident I wouldn’t get the lay-ups in the these situations – yet, I believe Michael is squarely on point.

  3. David,

    Thanks for sharing Michael’s post. I really enjoyed reading it. I love how he handled the situation.

  4. Great post David, and thank you for leading me to Michael’s blog to follow. Have a great Tuesday!

  5. Thanks for reblogging Michael’s post. What a great way to handle a problem like this. I’ve met people like the ones he dealt with on the plane. They seem to think their own comforts should come before anyone else’s no matter what. They want all the privileges and none of the responsibilities.

  6. I am with you on caving. Been in that situation many times. I shouldn’t but always wonder what the people around me are going to think if I don’t help…especially when they are all staring at me with anticipation like its a game show. Great blog as I have learned a polite way of handling the situation and will try it next time I am put I that situation. Thanks Dave!

  7. I love this! It taught me a great lesson that I can use to help others. David, thank you for sharing Michael’s excellent post!

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